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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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Flynn Creek crater is a 3.8 km diameter, 360-million-year-old impact structure located in north central Tennessee, and is an invaluable terrestrial analog for the study of impact cratering dynamics. The Flynn Creek Crater Sample Collection consists of over two thousand boxes of drill core from 18 drill holes in the crater’s central uplift, floor, and rim. Impact-induced hydrothermal systems are of considerable scientific interest because they may have played a significant role in the origin and evolution of life on early Earth and produced temporary near-surface habitable environments on Mars. Between 1967 and 1979, USGS scientist Dr. David Roddy conducted a drilling program at Flynn Creek crater. The drilling...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management compiled Massachusetts vector shorelines into an updated dataset for the Office’s Shoreline Change Project. The Shoreline Change Project started in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the Massachusetts coast by compiling a database of historical shoreline positions. Trends of shoreline position over long- and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future changes to costal resources and infrastructure. This updated dataset strengthens the understanding of shoreline position change in Massachusetts. It includes U.S. Geological Survey vector shorelines...
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During Hurricane Irma, Florida and Georgia experienced substantial impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses from hurricanes result in increased vulnerability of coastal regions, including densely populated areas. Erosion may put critical infrastructure at risk of future flooding and may cause economic loss. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program is working to assess shoreline erosion along the southeast U.S. coastline and analyze its implications for future vulnerability.
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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Note: this data release has been deprecated due to errors found in the ARGNXX.wdm file. Please see the detail in new data release at https://doi.org/10.5066/P146RBHK IMPORTANT NOTE: A more recent version of this data release is available from this link. This data release is the update of the U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase data release by Bera and Over (2016), with the processed data through September 30, 2015. The primary data for each year is downloaded from the ANL website (http://gonzalo.er.anl.gov/ANLMET/numeric/) and is processed following the guidelines documented in Over and others (2010) and Bera (2014). Hourly potential evapotranspiration computed using the computer program LXPET (Lamoreux Potential...
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This dataset contains images obtained from unmanned aerial systems (UAS) flown in the Cape Cod National Seashore. The objective of the field work was to evaluate the quality and cost of mapping from UAS images. Low-altitude (approximately 120 meters above ground level) digital images were obtained from cameras in a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flown from the lawn adjacent to the Coast Guard Beach parking lot on 1 March, 2016. The UAV was a Skywalker X8 flying wing operated by Raptor Maps, Inc., contractors to the U.S. Geological Survey. U.S. Geological Survey technicians deployed and mapped 28 targets that appear in some of the images for use as ground control points. All activities were conducted according...
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The Hudson Shelf Valley is the submerged seaward extension of the ancestral Hudson River drainage system and is the largest physiographic feature on the Middle Atlantic continental shelf. The valley begins offshore of New York and New Jersey at about 30-meter (m) water depth, runs southerly and then southeasterly across the Continental Shelf, and terminates on the outer shelf at about 85-m water depth landward of the head of the Hudson Canyon. Portions of the 150-kilometer-long valley were surveyed in 1996, 1998, and 2000 using a Simrad EM1000 multibeam echosounder mounted on the Canadian Coast Guard ship Frederick G. Creed. The purpose of the multibeam echosounder surveys was to map the bathymetry and backscatter...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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The natural resiliency of the New Jersey barrier island system, and the efficacy of management efforts to reduce vulnerability, depends on the ability of the system to recover and maintain equilibrium in response to storms and persistent coastal change. This resiliency is largely dependent on the availability of sand in the beach system. In an effort to better understand the system's sand budget and processes in which this system evolves, high-resolution geophysical mapping of the sea floor in Little Egg Inlet and along the southern end of Long Beach Island near Beach Haven, New Jersey was conducted from May 31 to June 10, 2018, followed by a sea floor sampling survey conducted from October 22 to 23, 2018, as part...
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The natural resiliency of the New Jersey barrier island system, and the efficacy of management efforts to reduce vulnerability, depends on the ability of the system to recover and maintain equilibrium in response to storms and persistent coastal change. This resiliency is largely dependent on the availability of sand in the beach system. In an effort to better understand the system's sand budget and processes in which this system evolves, high-resolution geophysical mapping of the sea floor in Little Egg Inlet and along the southern end of Long Beach Island near Beach Haven, New Jersey was conducted from May 31 to June 10, 2018, followed by a sea floor sampling survey conducted from October 22 to 23, 2018, as part...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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Note: this data release has been deprecated due to errors found in the ARGNXX.wdm file. Please see the detail in new data release at https://doi.org/10.5066/P146RBHK This data release (DR) is the update of the U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase data release by Bera (2022), with the processed data through September 30, 2022. The primary data for water year 2022 (a water year is the 12-month period, October 1 through September 30, in which it ends) is downloaded from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) (Argonne National Laboratory, 2022) and is processed following the guidelines documented in Over and others (2010). This DR also describes the Watershed Data Management (WDM) database file ARGN22.WDM. The WDM...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Bald Point State Park, CMGP, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, DSAS, Digital Shoreline Analysis System, All tags...
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This data release is the update of the U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase data release by Bera and Over (2018), with the data processed through September 30, 2018. The primary data for water year 2018 (a water year is the 12-month period, October 1 through September 30, designated by the calendar year in which it ends) were downloaded from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) (Argonne National Laboratory, 2018) and processed following the guidelines documented in Over and others (2010). Daily potential evapotranspiration (PET) is computed from average daily air temperature, average daily dewpoint temperature, daily total wind speed, and daily total solar radiation, and disaggregated to hourly PET by using the...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...


map background search result map search result map Low-altitude aerial imagery obtained with unmanned aerial systems (UAS) flights over Coast Guard Beach, Nauset Spit, Nauset Inlet, and Nauset Marsh, Cape Cod National Seashore, Eastham, Massachusetts on 1 March 2016 (JPEG images) Meteorological Database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, January 1, 1948 - September 30, 2015 (Deprecated) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for Louisiana Shorelines of the Florida north (FLnorth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis GeoTIFF image of shaded-relief bathymetry, colored by backscatter intensity, of the sea floor of the Hudson Shelf Valley (12-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) Meteorological Database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, January 1, 1948 - September 30, 2018 (Deprecated) Intersects for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for the Buzzards Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Chirp seismic reflection data from the Edgetech 512i collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS field activity 2018-001-FA (shotpoints point shapefile, survey trackline shapefile, PNG profile images, and SEG-Y trace data). Multibeam Echosounder, Reson T-20P tracklines collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS Field Activity 2018-001-FA (Esri polyline shapefile, GCS WGS 84) Historical shoreline positions for the coast of MA, from 1844 - 2014 Uncertainty of forecasted shoreline positions for Florida and Georgia Intersects for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Meteorological Database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, January 1, 1948 - September 30, 2022 (Deprecated) A GIS compilation of vector shorelines for the Virginia coastal region from the 1840s to 2010s Long-term shoreline change rates for the Virginia coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Virginia generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Terrestrial Analog Sample Collections: Flynn Creek Crater Sample Collection Low-altitude aerial imagery obtained with unmanned aerial systems (UAS) flights over Coast Guard Beach, Nauset Spit, Nauset Inlet, and Nauset Marsh, Cape Cod National Seashore, Eastham, Massachusetts on 1 March 2016 (JPEG images) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) Meteorological Database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, January 1, 1948 - September 30, 2022 (Deprecated) Chirp seismic reflection data from the Edgetech 512i collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS field activity 2018-001-FA (shotpoints point shapefile, survey trackline shapefile, PNG profile images, and SEG-Y trace data). Multibeam Echosounder, Reson T-20P tracklines collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS Field Activity 2018-001-FA (Esri polyline shapefile, GCS WGS 84) Intersects for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for the Buzzards Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for coastal region of Virginia generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Virginia coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 A GIS compilation of vector shorelines for the Virginia coastal region from the 1840s to 2010s GeoTIFF image of shaded-relief bathymetry, colored by backscatter intensity, of the sea floor of the Hudson Shelf Valley (12-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84) Historical shoreline positions for the coast of MA, from 1844 - 2014 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for Louisiana Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Shorelines of the Florida north (FLnorth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Intersects for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Terrestrial Analog Sample Collections: Flynn Creek Crater Sample Collection Uncertainty of forecasted shoreline positions for Florida and Georgia