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Black Gold is a collection of nine articles looking at specific individuals, oil fields, issues, and oil companies in the history of Wyoming's oil industry. Individually, each chapter focuses on an important item or incident in that history; together they illustrate patterns in the development of Wyoming's oil industry. The reader will come to see the important roll played by big business and the federal government in Wyoming's oil history. This roll at times contributed to, and at other times retarded, the development of Wyoming's oil industry.
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A summary of the early history of this uniquely spectacular national park, including quotes from the journals of first explorers to see and describe it. Published in Canyon country, on pages 160 p. - 160 p., in 1988.
Downscaling climate projections to model ecological change on topographically diverse landscapes of the arid southwestern U.S., credited to Eischeid, J.K., published in 2010. Published in The Colorado Plateau IV: Shaping Conservation Through Science and Management, on pages 22 - 43, in 2010.
Environmental Chemistry of Selenium: Written as a complement to the definitive work, Selenium in the Environment (Marcel Dekker, Inc.), this timely resource presents basic and the most recent applied research developments in selenium remediation - emphasizing field investigations as well as covering topics from analytical methods and modeling to regulatory aspects from federal and state perspectives. Published in Environmental Chemistry of Selenium, on pages 297 - 313, in 1998.
A selected survey of Rocky Mountain/Great Plains riparian research with emphasis on livestock grazing impacts and management is presented. A multiuniversity plan for studying interactions between livestock grazing and riparian resources in the region is presented. The power of an integrated, regionwide approach is compared with that of one involving the conduct of numerous independent, site-specific studies. An analogy is made to California, considering the State as a region. The need for support of long-term riparian research by traditional academic funding sources is also stressed. Published in California Riparian Systems: Ecology, Conservation, and Productive Management, on pages 413 - 423, in 1984.
This collection of papers on the geology of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River is an outgrowth of informal conversations among Colorado Plateau geologists over a period of several years. Published by University of Arizona Press, in 2004.
Includes a brief history of human development of the arid Colorado River drainage, plus an outline of projected needs for an ever-expanding human population. The first legal protection for most native nongame fishes and their natural habitats in the 1960s was followed by a surge of research. This led in the 1970s to the formal Colorado River Fish Project. Conflict between water development and endangered fishes continued, however, stimulating the initiation of a special project to find an administrative solu- tion to the problem. This process ended in formation of a fifteen-year Recovery Implementation Program to coordi- nate federal, state, and private actions to conserve rare fishes in a manner thought compatible...
The purpose of this essay is to describe how systematics and taxonomy can better address conservation issues in both theoretical and utilitarian ways. I begin with a discussion of organismic diversity and how systematics and Linnaean taxonomy have failed to meet the needed description and quantification of diversity for conservation purposes. I then argue that recognizing diversity is more critical than recognizing species, and I suggest how diversity can be incorporated into systematics using measures of phylogenetic diversity and phylogenetic taxonomy. In the final section, I suggest three utilitarian ways conservation systematics can incorporate diversity into management and politics: (1) set priorities for conservation;...
Taken from the first paragraph of the introduction: The Rocky Mountains, the great backbone of North America, extend 5,000 kilometers from New Mexico to Canada. The elevations range from about 1,500 meters along the plains to 4,399 meters, and the widths range from 120 to 650 kilometers (Lavender 1975). The Rocky Mountains are composed of many mountain ranges with unique ecological features. For example, 20 ranges make up the Rocky Mountains in and adjacent to Wyoming (Knight 1994). The natural beauty, abundant wildlife, and fresh water have attracted human inhabitants for the last 10,000–12,000 years (Fig. 1). Published in Status and Trends of the Nation's Biological Resources, on pages 473 - 504, in 1998.
This chapter uses climate-sensitive decision environments along the Colorado River to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the water management issues and the role of climate in these contexts. The four examples are in: (1) the border region: international issues; (2) Arizona and California: interstate issues in the Lower Basin; (3) Native American water rights; and (4) conjunctive use and management: groundwater and surface water in Arizona. Published in Drought and water crises: science, technology, and management issues, in 2005.
Categories: Publication; Types: Book Citation, Citation; Tags: CRC Press
Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers an area of 130,000 square miles. The relatively high semi-arid province boasts nine national parks, sixteen national monuments, many state parks, and dozens of wilderness areas. With the highest concentration of parklands in North America and unique geological and ecological features, the area is of particular interest to researchers. Derived from the Eighth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau, this third volume in a series of research on the Colorado Plateau expands upon the previous two books. This volume focuses on the integration of science into resource management issues, summarizes...
The Prokaryotes, credited to Stackebrandt, Erko, published in 2006. Published by Springer New York, in 2006.
Categories: Publication; Types: Book Citation, Citation; Tags: Springer New York
Recent studies of past climate and streamflow conditions have broadened understanding of long-term water availability in the Colorado River, revealing many periods when streamflow was lower than at any time in the past 100 years of recorded flows. That information, along with two important trends--a rapid increase in urban populations in the West and significant climate warming in the region--will require that water managers prepare for possible reductions in water supplies that cannot be fully averted through traditional means. Colorado River Basin Water Management assesses existing scientific information, including temperature and streamflow records, tree-ring based reconstructions, and climate model projections,...
Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Canyonlands National Park were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Park. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. No significant differences were found in foliage sulfur concentrations among the 10 sampling sites; however, trees within sites were significantly different. Needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were very low, approximately 4% of the average needle concentrations....
Categories: Publication; Types: Book Citation, Citation; Tags: Oak Ridge, TN
The relatively few studies done on phosphorus (P) cycling in arid and semiarid lands (drylands) show many factors that distinguish P cycling in drylands from that in more mesic regions. In drylands, most biologically relevant P inputs and losses are from the deposition and loss of dust. Horizontal and vertical redistribution of P is an important process. P is concentrated at the soil surface and thus vulnerable to loss via erosion. High pH and CaCO3 limit P bioavailability, and low rainfall limits microbe and plant ability to free abiotically bound P via exudates, thus making it available for uptake. Many invasive plants are able to access recalcitrant P more effectively than are native plants. As P availability...
* Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes * Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other * Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy * Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which...
A comprehensive overview of interaction of the major hydrological and meteorological processes in mountain areas ie Cryosphere and Climatic Change, Snow Melt and Soil Water, Run-off and Floods, Water fluxes and Water Balance, Hydro-meteorological Coupling and Modelling. Each section will review recent research in the field and illustrate key interactions with case studies from mountainous regions in Europe, The Americas and Central Asia. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, in 2005.
Used first paragraph of the chapter: Moisture is one of the premiere limiting factors for plants and animals, and where moisture is not limiting-in streams, marshes, lakes, and the land areas adjacent to these features (the riparian zone}:-one finds very distinctive communities of water� dependent and drought-intolerant species. Major streams in the foothills and basins of the San Juan region are commonly lined with riparian woodlands dominated by cottonwoods (Populus spp.). These wood� lands and associated phreatophytic vegeta�tion (composed of plants that require a perennial water source near the soil surface) have changed dramatically during the latter half of the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries on the...
Welcome to the home of Encyclopedia of Hydrological Sciences online! Here you will find a wealth of information about this exciting and important publication, which first published in print in October 2005, and is now being updated online. Pressures are increasing on the availability and exploitation of fresh water resources due to population increase, pollution and degradation of resources, and variations in distribution as a result of regional and global change in the climate. A compilation of knowledge in this area, therefore, has become a prerequisite for education and training of research, as well as practising hydrologists. The Encyclopedia of Hydrological Sciences is the definitive research-level treatment...
Over the past thirty years, late Quaternary environments in the arid interior of western North America have been revealed by a unique source of fossils: well-preserved fragments of plants and animals accumulated locally by packrats and quite often encased, amberlike, in large masses of crystallized urine. These packrat middens are ubiquitous in caves and rock crevices throughout the arid West, where they can lie preserved for tens of thousands of years. More than a thousand of these deposits have been dated and analyzed, and middens have supplanted pollen records as a touchstone for studying vegetation dynamics and climatic change in radiocarbon time (the last 40,000 years). Now, similar deposits made by other mammals...


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