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Filters: Tags: {"type":"Subject","name":"climate change"} (X) > Types: ArcGIS REST Map Service (X)

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This map shows areas of high current, near-term, and long-term potential landscape development, based on factors such as urban areas, agriculture, roads, and energy development.
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
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Streamflows in late spring and summer have declined over the last century in the western U.S. and mean annual streamflow is projected to decrease by six to 25% over the next 100 years. In arid and semi-arid regions of the western US, it is likely that some perennial streams will shift to intermittent flow regimes in response to climate-driven changes in timing and magnitude of precipitation, runoff, and evaporation. The project will address the following two research question: how will small stream (1st-3rd order) low flow hydrology be impacted by predicted longer, drier summers in the Upper Colorado River Basin under climate change and in turn, what will be the resulting impacts on riparian plant communities?...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: ArcGIS REST Map Service, ArcGIS Service Definition, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: AZ-01, Applications and Tools, Arizona, CO-03, Colorado, All tags...
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This map shows naturalized flow change for April-July for 3 periods: 1951-1965 (historic), 2016-2030, and 2046-2060 simulated by the Bureau of Reclamation across 112 GCM scenarios.
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This map shows long-term potential for climate change, which was calculated using a logic model to integrate the factors of: vegetation change summer & winter temperature change annual precipitation change runoff change.
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This map shows climate parameters and MAPSS biogeography model data for the western US from PRISM (1968-1999), and future climate projections from the regional climate model RegCM3 using ECHAM5, GENMOM, and GFDL projections as boundary conditions for 2015-2030, and 2045-2060.
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
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The Nature Conservancy’s Southeast Resilience Project aimed to identify key places areas for conservation based on land characteristics that increase diversity and resilience. This is the estimated resilience score, based on the combined scores of landscape diversity and local connectedness, and ranked relative to the geophysical setting and ecoregion. The estimated resilience score is given as a SD category based on its standard normalized score for the setting and ecoregion. The Resilience Project DOES NOT take into account sea level rise. A climate-resilient conservation portfolio includes sites representative of all geophysical settings selected for their landscape diversity and local connectedness. We developed...
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
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Land managers have incorporated threats to biodiversity for nearly two decades, but very few efforts have included threats from future conditions and fewer still have assessed vulnerability to climate change. This project will address two themes: 1) providing foundational information about habitat fragmentation and connectivity and 2) identifying the degree of vulnerability of key habitats to climate change.For development of understanding broadextent, a landscape-level pattern of climate change is an important complement to approaches to estimate rangeshifts for certain key focal species. Ecological system types (i.e. coarsefilters) are widely used in conservation planning because they contain valuable resources...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: ArcGIS REST Map Service, ArcGIS Service Definition, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: AZ-01, AZ-04, Applications and Tools, CO-02, CO-03, All tags...


    map background search result map search result map Modeling Low Stream Flows and Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Potential Stream Drying under Climate Change in the Upper Colorado River Basin Vulnerability and Connectivity of Natural Landscapes and Riparian Habitat in the SRLCC TNC Southeast Resilience Colorado Plateau REA Change Agents - Climate Change Colorado Plateau REA Change Agents - Climate Change - Long-Term Potential For Change Colorado Plateau REA Change Agents - Development - Current, Near-Term, and Long-Term Potential High Landscape Development Colorado Plateau REA MQ J4: Where are aquatic/riparian areas with potential to change from climate change? Colorado Plateau REA Change Agents - Climate Change - Long-Term Potential For Change Colorado Plateau REA MQ J4: Where are aquatic/riparian areas with potential to change from climate change? Modeling Low Stream Flows and Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Potential Stream Drying under Climate Change in the Upper Colorado River Basin Colorado Plateau REA Change Agents - Climate Change Colorado Plateau REA Change Agents - Development - Current, Near-Term, and Long-Term Potential High Landscape Development Vulnerability and Connectivity of Natural Landscapes and Riparian Habitat in the SRLCC TNC Southeast Resilience