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This dataset represents the Terrestrial Conservation Opportunity Areas identified by the 2015 update to Missouri's State Wildlife Action Plan.
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The Ironcolor Shiner (Notropis chalybaeus) is found in deep pool areas of creeks and small rivers and is often associated with aquatic vegetation. This species needs clear sandy areas for spawning. Populations of Ironcolor Shiner are in decline due to increased turbidity, siltation, and pollution.
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The Waccamaw Silverside (Menidia extensa) has a very limited distribution confined to Lake Waccamaw in North Carolina, a lake with neutral pH levels from underlying limestone formations in an area of acidic natural waters. This species is found in large schools and often over dark-colored substrates. Its limited habitat is threatened by nutrient loading caused by the runoff of organic matter and agricultural chemicals.
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Relative condition of fish habitat in streams of the Pacific Coast States. Histogram shows percentage of total stream length in each condition class.
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Partnership - Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnership Anchialine pools represent an inland waterbody type that is widespread but threatened throughout the Hawaiian Islands and is a key habitat type of concern to the Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnership. Anchialine pools, also known as fishponds in Hawaii, are near the coast and are land-locked bodies of water that have connections both to the sea, typically by high tides, as well as to local freshwater. These systems have been used for thousands of years for fish production by Native Hawaiians. The majority of remaining fishpond pools are located on the Kona coast and southern coastlines of the Big Island, the southeast coast of Maui, and on several small and widely separated...
This item provides the ScienceBase query that identifies components of the fish habitat assessments within the Central Midwest States. It also contains a link to a configuration file that pulls these pieces of information into a logical order. This information can be accessed through the ScienceBase API to display a summary of fish habitat assessment information for the Central Mississippi River States.
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State-wide data on fish populations were limited in Alaska for use in this assessment, as was a detailed spatial (mapping) framework that fully characterizes watersheds throughout the state at the time this assessment was conducted. Because of these factors, we modified our assessment methods to account for these limitations. Twenty-one landscape disturbance variables were assembled from medium-sized watersheds throughout the state (i.e., 12-digit hydrologic unit code watersheds). Variables were then assigned to one of six categories based on their disturbances to stream habitats. Categories include: urban land use, agricultural land use, point source pollution and water quality, barriers to fish movement, human...
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The habitats of the Southeast Atlantic states range from the mountains and uplands in the Blue Ridge and Piedmont areas in the western portion of this region to the Southeastern and Coastal Plains. Fish habitats in the higher elevation regions are typically fast-moving, clear, coldwater streams originating from seeps and springs, while warmwater rivers of the plains carry more organic material and sediment. This diversity of habitats along a very long period of stable geologic activity produces one of the most diverse assemblages of aquatic species in the nation. The Altamaha, Chattahoochee, Flint, Savannah, Catawba, Pee Dee, Broad, and Neuse are major rivers of the region. There are a large number of dams on waterways...
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Partnerships - Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership, Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture, Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership, and Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership Removed four barriers that opened access to six mile of streams and restored 21 miles of streams to improve habitat for Eastern Brook Trout and other fish species. A shoreline restoration demonstration area was constructed near the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Visitors Center in North Carolina. Native vegetation was used to stabilize 175’ of shoreline to be used as a showcase for other lakeshore property owners. Planted 0.2 acres of tidal marsh and installed 0.1 acres of oyster reefs in Stump Sound, North Carolina. Also planted 0.15 acres...
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Available data for the American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) indicate that, overall, there have been declines in recruitment, population, and escapement during three generations (36 years). A recent report indicated that barriers to migration (dams and weirs), passage through turbines at hydropower dams, habitat degradation or loss, and overharvest were likely the greatest threats by humans across the species’ range. Although eels are able to ascend many smaller barriers, recent studies have documented a tenfold reduction in eel density above each potentially passable barrier. For example, the number of juvenile eels migrating to Lake Ontario passing over hydropower dams fell from 935,000 in 1985 to approximately 8,000...
This ScienceBase item provides the queries and code that identifies components and organization of the detailed methodology for the National Fish Habitat Partnership's regional estuary assessment for the Northern Gulf of Mexico.
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We propose to support the revision and implementation of the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative’s Conservation Blueprint by integrating its Ecosystem Indicators into a structured decision support system that makes explicit how the Indicators are interrelated and how these will respond to management and policy interventions aimed at improving the conservation status of the South Atlantic region. Our specific objectives are to (1) develop ecological production functions that predict theecological impacts of selected conservation actions relative to current conditions, and to propagate these impacts through other affected systems or functions; (2) codify protocols for updating and curating geospatial...
We will develop SMART-SLEUTH, an advanced spatially explicit modeling framework designed to augment the current SLEUTH model with sophisticated smart-growth capabilities. Based on the latest version of SLEUTH, we will create an open-source GIS-enabled software package that will implement SMART-SLEUTH with advanced modules and tools for evaluating, predicting, and visualizing smart growth scenarios and outcomes. In this software package, a more user friendly Graphic User Interface (GUI), a multi-level automatic calibration approach built on machine learning algorithms, and new spatial landscape metrics for quantifying land change patterns will provide enhanced support for complex model configuration, calibration,...
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Version 2.0 Data Viewer for the South Atlantic Create a Version 2.0 Simple Viewer for the South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint that includes updates, additional data (category priorities, actions, justifications, ownership, and partner data), and dynamic charting of indicators and presentation of ecosystem and analysis unit aggregate indicator scores. Continue to refine and improve the South Atlantic Conservation Planning Atlas (salcc.databasin.org) Provide technical guidance and recommendations about how to structure data and future Viewer platforms to achieve specific functions for future versions of the Blueprint hosted within an interactive viewer and the South Atlantic Conservation Planning Atlas.
The Bering Cisco (Coregonus laurettae) is endemic to Alaska and is present primarily along the State’s west and north coasts. It is known to spawn in only three river systems – the Yukon, Kuskokwim, and Susitna Rivers. Genetic research indicates that each of these populations is distinct. The Bering Cisco has been observed to migrate more than 1,200 miles into freshwater streams to spawn. Unlike salmon, some of these fish survive spawning runs. Since this species is slow-growing but short-lived, it is highly vulnerable to alterations in stream flow or water quality and large-scale environmental disasters.
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In the mostly arid Southwestern United States, water availability (hydrology – a key fish habitat process), wildfires, and grazing intensity are important disturbances that are known to have major, negative effects on fish habitats. While this assessment indicated that many of the streams in this region are in good condition, a number of key habitat variables (i.e. water availability, wildlife frequency and intensity, and grazing intensity) could not be directly included in this assessment because national datasets of these disturbances and their measured variable are unavailable. Their absence from this assessment, along with absences of other disturbances, has likely produced an overestimation of habitat condition...
Refinement of Gopher Tortoise Habitat Identification and Related Land Cover Data. The benefits of this project include: 1) much improved gopher tortoise remote habitat identification that could have a strong influence on potential listing status (with the likelihood that significantly more habitat may be identified); 2) better statewide land cover data regarding scrubby flatwoods and potentially refined mesic flatwoods and dry prairie classifications; and 3) potential spin off benefits regarding better habitat identification for related species such as gopher frogs and other xeric adapted species that might be found in on drier flatwoods and dry prairie sites.This raster represents a potential habitat for the Florida...
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Changes in stream temperature can have significant impacts on water quality and the health and survival of aquatic fish and wildlife. Water managers, planners, and decision makers are in need of scientific data to help them prepare for and adapt to changes and conserve important resources. Scientists are tasked with ensuring that this data is produced in useful formats and is accessible to these stakeholders. In October 2015, project researchers hosted and facilitated a 1.5 day workshop, “Data Storage, Dissemination and Harvesting”, that brought together over 50 stakeholders from state and federal agencies, tribal governments, universities, and non-profit organizations interested in monitoring stream temperature...
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Throughout Alaska, land managers and rural communities are faced with developing climate adaptation strategies to prepare for changes in landscapes, ecosystems and terrestrial habitats and their associated resources and services. One of the greatest challenges for land use managers and stakeholders in Alaska is the discovery and accessibility of relevant scientific information and data. The effective dissemination and communication of science relies on improving access for stakeholders to discover research, management plans, and data within their geographic area of interest. To respond to this need, the Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NWBLCC) has launched the Northwest Boreal Science and Management...


map background search result map search result map Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Kiholo Estuary-Fishpond Complex, Hawaii Summary of Scientific Findings for Southwestern States Habitat Trouble for Ironcolor Shiner in Upper Midwest States Pacific Coast States - Risk of Current Degradation Chart (Stream Length) Generalized Methodology for Stream Assessments of Alaska and Hawaii Summary of Scientific Findings for Southeast Atlantic States Habitat Trouble for American Eel in Northeastern States Fish Habitat Partnership Activities for the Southeast Atlantic States Habitat Trouble for Waccamaw Silverside in Southeast Atlantic States Missouri - Terrestrial Conservation Opportunity Areas Models of ecological uplift from conservation activities in the SALCC Prioritizing Stream Temperature Data Collection to Meet Stakeholder Needs and Inform Regional Analyses Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool Version 2.0 Data Viewer for the South Atlantic Missouri - Terrestrial Conservation Opportunity Areas Summary of Scientific Findings for Southeast Atlantic States Fish Habitat Partnership Activities for the Southeast Atlantic States Habitat Trouble for Waccamaw Silverside in Southeast Atlantic States Habitat Trouble for American Eel in Northeastern States Habitat Trouble for Ironcolor Shiner in Upper Midwest States Models of ecological uplift from conservation activities in the SALCC Version 2.0 Data Viewer for the South Atlantic Pacific Coast States - Risk of Current Degradation Chart (Stream Length) Summary of Scientific Findings for Southwestern States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Kiholo Estuary-Fishpond Complex, Hawaii Northwest Boreal Science and Management Research Tool Prioritizing Stream Temperature Data Collection to Meet Stakeholder Needs and Inform Regional Analyses Generalized Methodology for Stream Assessments of Alaska and Hawaii