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Systematic conservation plans have only recently considered the dynamic nature of ecosystems. Methods have been developed to incorporate climate change, population dynamics, and uncertainty in reserve design, but few studies have examined how to account for natural disturbance. Considering natural disturbance in reserve design may be especially important for the world's remaining intact areas, which still experience active natural disturbance regimes. We developed a spatially explicit, dynamic simulation model, CONSERV, which simulates patch dynamics and fire, and used it to evaluate the efficacy of hypothetical reserve networks in northern Canada. We designed six networks based on conventional reserve design methods,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: A1-Wildlife
Wildlife, one of the United States' most treasured natural resources, faces a dire future. Changing climate conditions will upend the natural world wild creatures inhabit. Shifts in precipitation, spreading disease, cascading ecological events, and catastrophic events such as wildfires and floods will present wildlife with challenges of a degree and frequency not seen in U.S. history. These shifts in climate will in turn bring to bear great pressure on the heralded U.S. approach to wildlife management. Ill equipped to respond to the jurisdictional fragmentation and scientific uncertainty that will predominate wildlife management in a changing climate, U.S. wildlife managers must seek out new tools to cope with the...
Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: M1-Mammals, A1-Wildlife
Contradictory management objectives in adjacent jurisdictions can affect transboundary wolves and their associated socio-ecological systems. Elite interviews and case study methodology were used in this thesis to explore three transboundary wolf management agreements, their effectiveness, and their impacts on wolves, ecosystems and stakeholders. Separate agreements between the State of Alaska and: Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, and Denali National Park and Preserve, and an agreement between Italy and Switzerland show that despite a diversity of socio-ecological contexts, approaches, and hierarchical level of actors, transboundary wolf agreements are prone to ephemerality. The ephemerality of these agreements...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: A1-Wildlife
Traditional aboriginal caribou-hunting peoples in northern Canada moved seasonally on the land until the late 1950s and this relationship is thousands of years old (Gordon 1996). Archaeological evidence in the Yukon shows that the relationship between humans and caribou in some parts of the Canadian North is up to 25 000 years old (Cinq-Mars 2001). The distribution of many Dene peoples anticipated the changing migratory movements of the barren ground caribou, especially before settlement. A recent economic valuation of just two of these barren ground herds (the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq herds) found that the domestic hunt of the more than 13 000 aboriginal peoples living on the ranges of these herds has an equivalent...
PURPOSE: The implementation of a population management program for Canada geese within the contiguous United States is proposed. In recent years, the numbers of Canada geese that nest and/or reside predominantly within the United States have undergone dramatic population growth, their numbers increasing to levels that are increasingly coming into conflict with human activities and causing personal and public property damage in many parts o the country. Conflicts between people as geese affect or damage several types of resources, including property, human health and safety, agricultural crops, and natural resources. The proposed management measures would be implemented through a regulatory mechanism that would allow...


map background search result map search result map Molecular Genetic Approaches in Wildlife Management Management Plan for Elk (Cervus elaphus) in the Yukon Respect for Grizzly Bears: an Aboriginal Approach for Co-existence and Resilience Molecular Genetic Approaches in Wildlife Management Management Plan for Elk (Cervus elaphus) in the Yukon Respect for Grizzly Bears: an Aboriginal Approach for Co-existence and Resilience