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The substrate beneath mangrove forests in the Pelican Cays complex is predominately peat composed mainly of mangrove roots. Leaves and wood account for less than 20% of the peat mass. At Cat Cay, the depth of the peat ranges from 0.2 m along the shoreline to 1.65 m in the island center, indicating that the island has expanded horizontally as well as vertically through below-ground, biogenic processes. Mangrove roots thus play a critical role in the soil formation, vertical accretion, and stability of these mangrove cays. The species composition of fossil roots changes markedly with depth: Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) was the initial colonizer on a coral base, followed by Avicennia germinans (black mangrove),...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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The Laysan teal (Anas laysanensis) is an endangered dabbling duck endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago but currently restricted to a single breeding population on Laysan Island. We studied its diet using fecal analysis and behavioral observations. Laysan teal fecal samples (N=118) contained prey items in 15 primary prey categories with a mean of 2.9 (range 0-7) taxa per sample. Sixty-two of these fecal samples were quantified with 2,270 prey items identified (mean items per sample 37; range 0-205). Based on fecal analysis and behavioral observations, we learned that the Laysan teal is not strictly a macroinsectivore as previously reported, but consumed seeds, succulent leaves, and algae, in addition to adult and...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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[No abstract available]
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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Abstract not supplied at this time
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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Ecological aspects of coral patch reefs were studied from 1981 to 1985 in Welles Harbor, Midway Atoll. Water temperatures varied from 17??C in February to 28??C in August. Sizes of reefs studied were described by mean area (59 m2), mean volume (52 m3), vertical relief (<1 m), and inter-reef isolation (100 m). Considerable temporal change in reef size occurred due to large winter swells shifting bottom sand. Six common species accounted for 70% of all individual fish visually censused over 4 years. Overall fish assemblage composition ranged from 11 to 46 fish/10 m2, from 3 to 14 species. Numerical abundance and species richness for all fish (pooled) strongly correlated with physical reef substrate characteristics...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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Candlelight reef is the buttressing western terminus of the northeastern St. Croix reef system, caused by a combination of paleotopography and longshore drift which created a stable pile of detrital material at this position. Reef colonization proceeded eastward along the former slope break on the limestone terrace; turbid gyres along the eastern margin of the former Southgate drainage prevented further westward colonization. The presence of detrital cobbles in Sand Cay and Candlelight reef is explained by this model. An unconformity between underlying fine-grained quartzose rocks and overlying carbonates, need represent only an eustatic sea level rise rather than any fundamental tectonic event.-from Author
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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This paper rather informally tells of miscellaneous events that occurred during field work in Mexico, the Pacific Islands, and Virginia over the course of about 35 years.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin
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conclusion: Lushly wooded Caroline Atoll, with the majority of its 39 islets (399 ha of land) either in near-pristine condition or having recovered remarkably from past disturbance, is one of the least spoiled atolls in the Pacific. Uninhabited, it harbors plant ecosystems and breeding seabirds (Pt. II) of national and international importance. Its marine and terrestrial ecosystems are prime outdoor ecological laboratories for research on geological processes including ground water, sea level changes, the dynamics of motu formation, fish poisoning, and numerous facets of ecology including plant succession and Pisonia growth rates. Caroline boasts prime coral reefs thickly studded with Tridacna clams, substantial...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Atoll Research Bulletin