Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: BiogeochemicalandHydrologicAssessment (X) > partyWithName: Gregory B Lawrence (X)

10 results (270ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
The Appalachian Trail (AT), a 14-state footpath from Maine to Georgia, is a unit of the National Park Service that is cooperatively managed and maintained by the National Park Service (NPS), the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, AT Club volunteers, the USDA Forest Service, and other public land-management agencies. Upper elevation and ridge-top ecosystems, which comprise much of the trail corridor, have been impacted by and remain extremely sensitive to acidic deposition. Ridgetop soils that are often low in calcium make the ecosystems of the AT more sensitive to acidic deposition than other ecosystems. Furthermore, upper elevations tend to receive the highest levels of deposition. In areas along the AT, such...
thumbnail
The growth of temperate forests is typically limited by the availability of nitrogen. Elevated concentrations of nitrate in some Catskill Mountain streams, which are tributary to New York City's water-supply reservoirs west of the Hudson River, indicate that the forests of this region are at the early stages of nitrogen saturation. That is, nitrogen is available in excess of the amount utilized by vegetation and soil microorganisms in the forests. Nitrogen saturation is a concern because the mobile nitrate that moves through soil is accompanied by other nutrients such as the base cations calcium and magnesium that are necessary for forest growth but are present in short supply in some Catskill soils. And, nutrient...
thumbnail
BACKGROUND The Adirondack region of New York has a history of relatively high atmospheric sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition (Greaver et al. 2012). Adirondack ecosystems have been impacted by these inputs, including soil and surface water acidification, and impaired health and diversity of forest vegetation and aquatic biota. Air quality management, through the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency NOx Budget Trading Program, and the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) has resulted in decreases in atmospheric S and N deposition in the Adirondacks and throughout the eastern U.S. (Lehmann et al., 2005), which is driving the recovery of surface waters from past acidification. Section 303(d)...
thumbnail
Mission Statement: The mission of the cooperative is to facilitate coordinated collection of high quality broad-based soil data to evaluate temporal dynamics, to complement meteorologic, hydrologic and biologic monitoring, and to support decision making and science education. Objectives: Develop and share protocols for field and lab soil sampling and analysis Identify information needs that would benefit policy and management decisions Establish a rigorous multi-scale soils collection program whose continuity is maintained while responding to emerging issues. Synthesize existing soil monitoring data, including a critical review of past research and analysis of time scales of various soil dynamics Compile...
thumbnail
Project Summary. The Western Adirondack Stream Survey (WASS), conducted in 2003-2005, showed that acidic deposition was causing toxic forms of Al to move from soils to streams in 66% of the 565 watersheds assessed in the study region. The WASS encompassed only 20% of the Adirondack region, and for the remaining 80% (referred to hereafter as the East-Central Adirondack region), there is little information on the extent of soil and stream acidification. Based on lake-chemistry data, acidification in the East-Central Adirondack region has been considered minimal relative to the Western Adirondack region. However, some lake acidification has been identified, and WASS results showed that lake acidification under...
thumbnail
The current Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring Program combines monitoring of streams and soils based on a watershed design. Not only are headwater streams an important component of Adirondack ecosystems, they are closely tied to the terrestrial environment through runoff that is strongly influenced by soil and vegetation processes. This linkage makes headwater streams a useful tool for monitoring the overall condition of the watershed, and by combining stream and soil monitoring within watersheds, the response of Adirondack ecosystems to environmental disturbances such as acid rain and climate change can be better understood. For example, the unexpectedly slow reversal of stream acidification from decreased atmospheric...
thumbnail
Monitoring of lake chemistry in the western Adirondack region has indicated reductions in the acidity of these lakes during the past two decades. However, lakes are not always reliable indicators of streams and soils. Uncertainty remains regarding the recovery potential of surface waters and the effects of acidic deposition on soils. Furthermore, nitrogen, long considered a growth-limiting nutrient for northern temperate forests, is likely to be available in excess of that needed by Adirondack forest ecosystems as a result of acidic deposition. In this region, excess nitrogen in the soil leads to acidification of soils and surface waters. Calcium, important for acid neutralization, is also an important nutrient,...
thumbnail
This project provides a regional assessment of sugar maple health and associated soil conditions in the Adirondack Region of New York, where sugar maple are a major component of the forest. The focus of the study is to develop an improved understanding of relationships among watershed characteristics, soil chemistry, and acidic deposition effects on sugar maple trees and other tree species that grow in association with sugar maple, which are one of the most highly valued tree species in the northeast. Project results are therefore important for the management of sugar maple in the Adirondack region where acidic deposition has lowered the nutritional status of soils by depleting calcium, a key nutrient for trees.Purpose...
thumbnail
Summary Acid rain levels in the Adirondack region have substantially declined and recovery from acid rain is underway. Recovery is being limited by the depletion of soil calcium that occurred over past decades. Not only is calcium needed for neutralizing acidity, it is an essential nutrient for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, recovery of soil calcium has not yet been observed. Whole-ecosystem restoration through watershed liming, possibly combined with in-stream liming, may provide a practical option for stimulating recovery of certain acid-sensitive, high-value natural resources. Information from past liming efforts, however, is insufficient for determining the degree of success that could be achieved...
thumbnail
BACKGROUND Air emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels in electrical power plants, building heating systems and vehicles are the major source of gaseous sulfur (SOx) and nitrogen (NOx) oxides in the atmosphere. These oxides dissolve in atmospheric moisture forming ions which are deposited by rain, snowfall and dust particles as acidic deposition. Acidic deposition releases soluble aluminum from the soil which can reach toxic concentrations in adjacent water bodies such as streams and wetlands. Acidic deposition also removes important nutrients such as calcium, potassium and magnesium from the soil negatively impacting local flora and fauna. Depletion of calcium combined with excess aluminum makes forest...


    map background search result map search result map An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Long-Term Monitoring of Buck Creek Watershed in the Western Adirondack Region of New York Whole Ecosystem Restoration Through Liming of Honnedaga Lake Tributary Watersheds Northeastern Soil Monitoring Cooperative Appalachian Trail MEGA-Transect Atmospheric Deposition Effects Study Assessment of sugar maple health and associated soil conditions in the Adirondack Region of New York Effects of acid rain on the ecological health of Long Island’s forests and ponds Adirondack Long-Term Stream and Soil Monitoring Assessment of Acidic Deposition Effects on the Chemistry and Benthos of Streams of the East-Central Adirondack Region Acidification and Recovery and Development of Critical Loads of Acidity for Stream Ecosystems of the Adirondack Region of New York State Long-Term Monitoring of Buck Creek Watershed in the Western Adirondack Region of New York Whole Ecosystem Restoration Through Liming of Honnedaga Lake Tributary Watersheds An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Effects of acid rain on the ecological health of Long Island’s forests and ponds Assessment of sugar maple health and associated soil conditions in the Adirondack Region of New York Assessment of Acidic Deposition Effects on the Chemistry and Benthos of Streams of the East-Central Adirondack Region Acidification and Recovery and Development of Critical Loads of Acidity for Stream Ecosystems of the Adirondack Region of New York State Adirondack Long-Term Stream and Soil Monitoring Appalachian Trail MEGA-Transect Atmospheric Deposition Effects Study Northeastern Soil Monitoring Cooperative