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The Pectoral Sandpiper is one of the most abundant breeding birds on the Arctic Coastal Plain ofAlaska. They typically have low nest site fidelity which is likely related to their promiscuousmating strategy, thus nest densities are highly variable from year to year at a given site (Holmesand Pitelka 1998). In Arctic Alaska, primary breeding habitat includes low-lying ponds in a mixof marshy to hummocky tundra and nests are typically placed in slightly raised or better drainedsites (Holmes and Pitelka 1998). Pectoral Sandpipers spend their winters primarily in southernSouth America (Holmes and Pitelka 1998). The current North American population estimate is500,000 and they are believed to be declining (Morrison et...
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The Arctic Tern completes annual epic migrations from pole to pole covering at least 40,000 kmon their round-trip journeys. They breed throughout Arctic Alaska from boreal to tundra habitatsand have their highest nesting densities inland (Lensink 1984). Arctic Terns typically choose nestsites on open ground near water and often on small islands in ponds and lakes (Hatch 2002).Arctic terns consume a wide variety of fish and invertebrate prey, fish are particularly importantduring the breeding season for feeding young (Hatch 2002). This species spends their winters(austral summers) in offshore waters near Antarctica (Hatch 2002). Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plainpopulation estimates from 2011 range from 7-12,000 (Larned...
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The Wildlife Conservation Society will assess the climate change vulnerability of bird species that regularly breed in substantial populations in Alaska using the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) tool. Initial work will focus on breeding birds in Arctic Alaska including shorebirds, waterfowl and waterbird species (loons, gulls, terns, jaegers), and land bird species (passerines, raptors, ptarmigan).
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The Red-necked Phalarope commonly breeds in both the Brooks Range foothills and ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska. In Alaska, this species typically nests in wet tundra near water’s edge.It differs from the Red Phalarope in that it breeds further inland and at higher elevations (Rubegaet al. 2000). Like other phalaropes, this species depends on aquatic food sources for much of itsdiet (Rubega et al. 2000). Red-necked Phalaropes spend winter at sea in tropical waters in largenumbers off the west coast of South America (Rubega et al. 2000). Current North Americanpopulation estimate is 2.5 million with a declining trend (Morrison et al. 2006).
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The Gyrfalcon, the largest falcon, is an iconic bird of the circumpolar arctic and subarctic. Thisspecies nests primarily on precipitous cliff faces and typically utilizes nests built by other species(particularly Common Raven, Golden Eagle, and Rough-legged Hawk) (Booms et al. 2008).Gyrfalcon main prey includes bird species ranging in size from passerines to geese whileptarmigan are the preferred prey. Although not well documented, in winter this species movessouth throughout Canada and sometimes into the northern lower 48. Current population on theNorth Slope (tundrius subspecies) is estimated at 250 breeding pairs (USFWS 2000).
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The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska is a globally important region for numerous avian species including millions of migrating and nesting waterbirds. Climate change effects such as sea level rise and increased storm frequency and intensity have the potential to impact waterbird populations and breeding habitat. In order to determine the potential impacts of these climate-mediated changes, we investigated both short-term and long-term impacts of storm surges to geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.To do this, we used 29 years of ground-based surveys conducted as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s long-term waterbird monitoring program along with flood indices modeled...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: BIRDS, BIRDS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DELTAS, All tags...
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This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in Bristol Bay communities. Climate change impacts were assessed through the lens of public health, with an eye towards the potential effects on disease, injury, food and water security, and mental health. Three focal communities were included in this assessment: Nondalton, a lake community, Levelock, a river community, and Pilot Point, a coastal community. The resulting assessment reports will be used to assist focal communities, as well as neighboring communities, in addressing climate-change related issues.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, COASTAL AREAS, COASTAL AREAS, Decision Support, All tags...
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The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska is a globally important region for numerousavian species including millions of migrating and nesting waterbirds. Climate change effectssuch as sea level rise and increased storm frequency and intensity have the potential to impactwaterbird populations and breeding habitat. In order to determine the potential impacts of theseclimate-mediated changes, we investigated both short-term and long-term impacts of stormsurges to geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Todetermine short-term impacts, we compared nest densities of geese and eiders in relation to themagnitude of storms that occurred in the prior fall from 2000–2013. Additionally, we modeledgeese...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: BIRDS, BIRDS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DELTAS, All tags...
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This project evaluated the potential impacts of storm surges and relative sea level rise on nesting geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta). Habitat suitability maps for breeding waterbirds were developed to identify current waterbird breeding habitat and distributions. Short-term climate change impacts were assessed by comparing nest densities in relation to magnitude of storms that occurred in the prior fall from 2000-2013. Additionally, nest densities were modeled using random forests in relation to the time-integrated flood index (e.g., a storm specific measure accounting for both water depth and duration of flooding) for four modeled storms (2005, 2006, 2009, and...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: BIRDS, BIRDS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DELTAS, All tags...
The YKD is also home to the largest subsistence-based economy in Alaska. Yet, the low-lying landscape mosaic characterizing the YKD is at risk of massive change associated with projected sea level rise (SLR), increasing storm frequency and severity and permafrost degradation due to future climate change. Therefore, to conserve ecosystem services associated with the botanical and faunal richness in the YKD, management strategies in the region should not only be based on current ecosystem conditions, but also incorporate projected changes in landscape composition. The goal of this project is to provide managers and people living in the YKD, an assessment of the vulnerability of the landscape to future change and to...
The Northwest Boreal LCC (NWB LCC) envisions a dynamic landscape that maintains functioning, resilient boreal ecosystems and associated cultural resources. To support this vision, the NWB LCC partnered with the BEACONs Project to implement a new approach to conservation planning, including the identification of ecological benchmarks to support implementation of active adaptive management. Within an adaptive management framework, benchmarks serve as reference areas for detecting and understanding the influence of human activity on ecological systems. They support the identification of management practices that sustain the wide range of environmental, cultural, and economic values of the northwest boreal. The NWB...
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Habitat hotspots were mapped for migratory birds ‘guilds’ across the LCD region using species presence/absence data collected from citizen-science datasets and modelled habitat conditions from the LANDFIRE program (Rollins, 2009). For presence/absence data, we used the eBird Reference Dataset (ERD, accessed October 1st, 2016; summarized in Sullivan et al., 2009) to model guild-level response to prevailing vegetation structure (e.g., percent-cover grass, tree, shrub, vegetation height), topography, and water availability for priority migratory bird species outlined in the Rio Mora NWR Land Protection Plan. We parsed eBird species “checklists” for species observed within a ~ 500 kilometer radius of the Rio Mora NWR....
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The aquifer saturated thickness product is a per-pixel (250 square-meters) model representation of the combined fluid and soil matrix volume of water available in a given area, represented in units of linear feet. The prediction of available water is made using a network of over 9,300 monitoring wells located throughout the High Plains aquifer region. These wells are part of an annually updated long-term water-level monitoring study being conducted by United States Geological Survey hydrologists and other partners (https://ne.water.usgs.gov/ogw/hpwlms/). We used the source well depth-to-water data, as well as information on the base elevation of the aquifer (USGS Report : ofr98-393), surface elevation (NED-DEM),...
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The American Tree Sparrow is a common breeding bird of boreal and tundra dominated habitatsin northern Canada and Alaska. This species breeds in open scrubby areas; willow, birch, andalder thickets, stunted spruce, open tundra with scattered shrubs, often near lakes or bogs(Naugler 1993). In summer American Tree Sparrows consume a wide variety of animal prey(primarily both larval and adult insects). Alaskan birds are short-distance migrants and winter intemperate North America (Naugler 1993). This species’ population is very large (>10 million)although the overall population has undergone a small (statistically insignificant) decrease overthe last 40 years in North America (Butcher and Niven 2007).
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The Long-billed Dowitcher is a medium-sized shorebird that commonly breeds on the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska. This species nests in higher densities in the western portion of thecoastal plain compared to the east (Johnson et al. 2007). They prefer wet grassy meadows fornesting often showing an affinity for sedge-willow, wet meadow or sedge marsh along drainagesor near ponds (Takekawa and Warnock 2000). Long-billed Dowitchers generally migrate west ofthe Mississippi River and winter primarily along the Pacific and Gulf Coasts of North Americainto Mexico (Takekawa and Warnock 2000). Current population estimate of the North Americanpopulation is 400,000 (Morrison et al. 2006).
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The White-rumped Sandpiper is a small shorebird that is a relatively rare breeder in ArcticAlaska. They nest in coastal wetlands between Barrow and Cape Halkett on the Arctic CoastalPlain of Alaska
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The Western Sandpiper is one of the most abundant sandpipers in the western hemisphere. InAlaska, the core of its breeding population is in the Yukon-Kuskokwim River Delta. It alsobreeds less commonly in the western portion of the North Slope (Johnson et al. 2007). Thisspecies nests in well-drained moist to upland tundra habitats dominated by dwarf shrubs andtussock grasses (Wilson 1994).
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These data represent a potential future condition of large block grasslands if CRP lands expire and the land-use reverts back to cropland. Data layers for 2022 and 2027 were calculated by reclassing CRP lands scheduled to expire prior to these years to cropland and recalculating the large block grasslands layer as described above.
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These data represent the long term average (27 year) amount of duck energy days available in wetlands. Data were produced as part of the PLJV waterfowl implementation plan. We used data from recently completed studies investigating food resource availability in a variety of wetland types in the PLJV. Beheny (2017) completed a study of food energy availability in five different wetland types in northeastern Colorado. Clark (2016) investigated food resource availability in stock ponds in BCR 19 in Texas. For the wetland DED values reported in both studies, we assumed these values were appropriate for use across the whole Joint Venture region. We used Landsat 5 data to determine wetness frequency over 27 years (1985-2012)...


map background search result map search result map Climate Change Health Assessments for Three Coastal, Riverine and Lake System Communities Project Summary: Climate change planning for the Great Plains:  Wildlife vulnerability assessment and potential for mitigation with grazing management Pectoral Sandpiper Red-necked Phalarope White-rumped Sandpiper Western Sandpiper Gyrfalcon Long-billed Dowitcher Webinar (2015 Oct 14) Final Report: The Influence of Fall Storms on Nest Densities of Geese and Eiders on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska Part I Summary: Predicting waterbird nest distributions Climate Change Vulnerability of Migrating Bird Species Breeding in Arctic Alaska American Tree Sparrow Future Large Block Grasslands in 2027 Aquifer Saturation Thickness 2013 Bird Habitat Suitability Lark and Grasshopper Wetland dud BCR 18 Arctic Tern Webinar (2015 Oct 14) Final Report: The Influence of Fall Storms on Nest Densities of Geese and Eiders on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska Part I Summary: Predicting waterbird nest distributions Future Large Block Grasslands in 2027 Aquifer Saturation Thickness 2013 Bird Habitat Suitability Lark and Grasshopper Wetland dud BCR 18 Climate Change Health Assessments for Three Coastal, Riverine and Lake System Communities Project Summary: Climate change planning for the Great Plains:  Wildlife vulnerability assessment and potential for mitigation with grazing management Pectoral Sandpiper Red-necked Phalarope White-rumped Sandpiper Western Sandpiper Gyrfalcon Long-billed Dowitcher Climate Change Vulnerability of Migrating Bird Species Breeding in Arctic Alaska American Tree Sparrow Arctic Tern