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Invasions of the annual species cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in North American ecosystems present a threat to the population viability of native plant and animal species. In the interest of curtailing B. tectorum success, we manipulated the biogeochemistry of Canyonlands National Park soils in greenhouse and germination experiments. We compared growth parameters of B. tectorum and a native perennial, Hilaria jamesii, in greenhouse experiments utilizing 10 soil additives. Biomass of B. tectorum growing in conjuction with H. jamesii was greater than that growing in monocultures, suggesting facilitation of Bromus growth by H. jamesii. The opposite trend was true for H. jamesii, indicating that Bromus inhibits H. jamesii...
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This dataset represents the variety (unique structural classes: water, bare, herbaceous, short shrubs, medium shrubs, short trees, tall trees) within 1 ha of bottomland areas. Traditional image interpretation cues were used to develop the polygons, such as shape, size, pattern, tone, texture, color, and shadow, from high resolution, true color, aerial imagery (0.3m resolution), acquired for the project. Additional, public available aerial photos (NAIP, 2011) were used to cross-reference cover classes. As with any digital layer, this layer is a representation of what is actually occurring on the ground. Errors are inherent in any interpretation of ground qualities. Due to the "snapshot" nature of the aerial photos,...
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This geologic map is a product of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. National Park Service to provide geologic information about this part of Canyonlands National Park, Utah. This digital map database contains bedrock data from previously published data that has been modified by the author. New mapping of the surficial deposits represents the general distribution of surficial deposits of the Druid Arch and The Loop 7.5-minute quadrangles.
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This dataset represents the relative average amount of non-woody cover within 2 ha) of bottomland along the Colorado River from the Colorado state line (San Juan and Grand Counties, Utah) to the southern Canyonlands NP boundary, as of September 2010. Traditional image interpretation cues were used to develop the polygons, such as shape, size, pattern, tone, texture, color, and shadow, from high resolution, true color, aerial imagery (0.3m resolution), acquired for the project. Additional, public available aerial photos (NAIP, 2011) were used to cross-reference cover classes. As with any digital layer, this layer is a representation of what is actually occurring on the ground. Errors are inherent in any interpretation...
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This map shows the channel boundary (2011) of the Colorado River mainstem between the Utah Colorado border and the upper pool of Lake Powell, Utah (146 miles). The channel boundary was mapped from public available NAIP imagery flown on June 28, 2011, when the river flow was 886 m3/s at the Cisco gage. The channel is subdivided into channel types: fast water (main channel, secondary channel), and still water types (backwater, isolated pool and tributary channel).
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This polygon feature class represents vegetation communities mapped at Canyonlands National Park. The polygons were generated using guidelines set by the Standardized National Vegetation Classification System (October 1995). A combination of methods were used to map Canyonlands. The USGS used e-Cognition software to create segments. The segments created were then looked at and extensively edited by the vegetation mappers. Some mapping was done on screen, using the 2002 imagery. Hard copy 9X9 photography was used for photo interpretation. Traditional image interpretation cues were used to develop the polygons, such as shape, size, pattern, tone, texture, color, and shadow. Additional data layers were used in aiding...
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This is a model showing general habitat diversity, including both the structural and cover type diversity. See Open File Report, Rasmussen and Shafroth, Colorado River Conservation Planning for geoprocessing details.
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This dataset represents ease of access to bottomland areas for vegetation treatments. Access may be by road, 4x4 near road, hike in by field crews or requiring overnight camping or raft access. Access is considered for each side of the river separately.
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This data set shows the extent of the Colorado River Conservation Planning project bottomland area as delineated by topography and vegetation, The bottomland area is subdivided into 1 km polygons measured from the upstream project boundary. Reach breaks were determined by large topographic shifts and/or tributary junctions by John Dohrenwend. Please see the project report for more details.
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Album caption and index card: Trail to Druid Arch, near its beginning at northeast corener of Chesler Park, marked only by rock cairns, two of which are visible. Canyonlands National Park. San Juan County, Utah. October 5, 1970. Note: Published as figure 52 in U.S. Geological Survey. Bulletin 1327. 1974. See also: lsw00076_ct
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Album caption and index card: Merrimac (left) and Monitor Buttes guard north entrance to Island in the Sky. White rock near middle is Navajo Sandstone. Buttes comprise all three members of Entrada Sandstone; remnant white top of Moab Member, vertical cliffs of Slick Rock Member, and sloping base of Dewey Bridge Member. Canyonlands National Park. Grand County, Utah. n.d. Note: Published as figure 12 in U.S. Geological Survey. Bulletin 1327. 1974. See also: lsw00063_ct
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Album caption and index card: Cataract Canyon of the Colorado River. Major rapids visible from the vicinity of Standing Rocks. Canyonlands National Park. Wayne County, Utah. 1960. (Photo by National Park Service)
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Album caption and index card: Bowknot Bend, of Green River, looking east from west end of narrow intervening saddle. Photograph was taken from the same camera station as in photograph number 647, on an expedition led by E.M. Shoemaker to recover camera stations of the 1871 voyage of Major John Wesley Powell and rephotograph the scenes to record changes during the nearly 100 year interval. Note that almost no changes occurred in the bedrock, or even in the loose rocks, but that considerable change occurred in the vegetation along the river. Although salt cedar (tamarisk) had been introduced into this country, from the Mediterranean area long before 1871, it had not yet spread to this area, but the bare islands shown...
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The structural stabilization of seven prehistoric ruins in Canyonlands National Park and Natural Bridges National Monument, credited to Gaunt, Joan K, published in 1985.
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This dataset represents the prevalence of trees as mapped along the Colorado River bottomland from the Colorado state line (San Juan and Grand Counties, Utah) to the southern Canyonlands NP boundary, as of September 2010. This mapping was conducted as part of the Colorado River Conservation Planning Project, a joint effort between the National Park Service, The Nature Conservancy, US Geological Survey, Bureau of Land Management, and Utah Forestry Fire and State Lands.
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This map shows stillness of water near bank vegetation within 15 m of the channel boundary (2011) of the Colorado River mainstem between the Utah Colorado border and the upper pool of Lake Powell, Utah (146 miles). The channel boundary was mapped from public available NAIP imagery flown on June 28, 2011, when the river flow was 886 m3/s at the Cisco gage. The channel is subdivided into channel types: main channel, secondary channel, backwater, isolated pool and tributary channel.
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This document is the final technical report of a cultural resources inventory and limited testing project in the Squaw Butte Area, Needles District, Canyonlands National Park, Utah. This project was conducted as part of a multiyear cultural resource program conducted by P-III Associates, Inc., on behalf of the National Park Service, Rocky Mountain Regional Office. The purposes of this multiyear effort are to provide management, scientific, and interpretive information on the prehistory of the park. Published by National Park Service, Rocky Mountain Regional Office, in 1995.
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Two models of fire risk are presented here. One shows risk of natural fire based on abundance of tamarisk and native trees only. The other shows risk of all fire, which includes abundance of tamarisk and native trees, but also proximity of human ignition sources (roads and campgrounds). Associated layers of the river channel at low flow and bottomland boundaries are included for reference.
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These layers show the relative abundance of native, non-native and tree cover types as mapped for the Colorado River Conservation Planning Project. Relative abundance (Dominant, Common, Mapped by Sparse and Not Mapped) is determined by the listing of cover types per patch.
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In this study, we examined N gas loss as nitric oxide (NO) from N-fixing biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah. We hypothesized that NO gas loss would increase with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soil. NO fluxes were measured from biologically crusted soils with three levels of N fixation potential (Scytonema-Nostoc-Collema spp. (dark)>Scytonema-Nostoc-Microcoleus spp. (medium)>Microcoleus spp. (light)) from soil cores and field chambers. In both cores and field chambers there was a significant effect of crust type on NO fluxes, but this was highly dependent on season. NO fluxes from field chambers increased with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically...


map background search result map search result map Surficial Geologic Map of The Loop and Druid Arch Quadrangles, Canyonlands National Park, Utah Biogeochemical control of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) germination, emergence, and growth Holocene archeology near Squaw Butte, Canyonlands National Park, Utah NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah The structural stabilization of seven prehistoric ruins in Canyonlands National Park and Natural Bridges National Monument Cataract Canyon of the Colorado River. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. 1960. Estimated Risk of Fire on the Colorado River Bottomland in Utah Native, Non-native and Tree Abundance Canyonlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Stillness of water for Bat Watering Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - General Diversity Model Output Data for Colorado River in Utah Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Diversity of All Structural Types for General Diversity Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Open Areas for Open Land Species Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Prevalence of Trees for Riparian Overstory Layer Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Presence of Still Water Plus 20 m for Riparian Understory Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Access to the Site for Relative Cost of Restoration Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Bottomland Boundary of the Colorado River Divided at Homogeneous River Reaches Merrimac and Monitor Buttes guard north entrance to Island in the Sky. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. n.d. Trail to Druid Arch, near its beginning at northeast corner of Chesler Park. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. 1970. Bowknot Bend of Green River. Canyonlands National Park. San Juan County, Utah. 1968. Surficial Geologic Map of The Loop and Druid Arch Quadrangles, Canyonlands National Park, Utah Cataract Canyon of the Colorado River. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. 1960. Merrimac and Monitor Buttes guard north entrance to Island in the Sky. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. n.d. Trail to Druid Arch, near its beginning at northeast corner of Chesler Park. Canyonlands National Park, Utah. 1970. Bowknot Bend of Green River. Canyonlands National Park. San Juan County, Utah. 1968. Biogeochemical control of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) germination, emergence, and growth Holocene archeology near Squaw Butte, Canyonlands National Park, Utah NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah Canyonlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data The structural stabilization of seven prehistoric ruins in Canyonlands National Park and Natural Bridges National Monument Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Stillness of water for Bat Watering Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Open Areas for Open Land Species Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - General Diversity Model Output Data for Colorado River in Utah Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Diversity of All Structural Types for General Diversity Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Prevalence of Trees for Riparian Overstory Layer Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Access to the Site for Relative Cost of Restoration Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Presence of Still Water Plus 20 m for Riparian Understory Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Bottomland Boundary of the Colorado River Divided at Homogeneous River Reaches Estimated Risk of Fire on the Colorado River Bottomland in Utah Native, Non-native and Tree Abundance