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Derived from: Wild Salmon Center. 2008. Pacific Salmon Conservation Assessment: Vector digital data. Portland, OR: Wild Salmon Center. Depending on the data available for a catchment, ourabundance estimates came either directly from otherresearchers’ estimates of abundance or indirectly fromestimates of spawning adults, catch, harvest rates, ormultiple-regression equations we developed to predict abundance. This database, with citations, is available fromhttp://www.stanford.edu/?mpinsky/salmon/.We caution that our abundance estimates come frommany different sources in which a wide variety ofmethods were used, so they are rough approximationsrather than precise estimates. This is the nature ofdata available for...
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Region(s) of distribution of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (Walbaum, 1792) in the Arctic as digitized for U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5038. For details on the project and purpose, see the report at https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20165038. Complete metadata for the collection of species datasets is in the metadata document "Dataset_for_Alaska_Marine_Fish_Ecology_Catalog.xml" at https://doi.org/10.5066/F7M61HD7. Source(s) for this digitized data layer are listed in the metadata Process Steps section. Note that the original source may show an extended area; some datasets were limited to the published map boundary. Distributions of marine fishes are shown in adjacent Arctic seas...
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In 2005, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) adopted Canada’s Policy for the Conservation of Wild Salmon Policy (the WSP) (DFO 2005). Implementation of the WSP consists of six strategies, the first of which requires the standardized monitoring of wild salmon status. Standardized monitoring begins with the identification of species-specific Conservation Units or CUs. The CUs serve two roles under the WSP. First, each CU is, in some sense, a significant element of biodiversity that the WSP seeks to conserve and manage. Second, each CU is a unit for reporting on the success (or failure) of actions taken under the WSP to conserve wild Pacific salmon. Subsequent steps in the Policy’s implementation, including...
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Concerns regarding the size and sex composition of Yukon River Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha have been expressed in public meetings for over a decade. However, reports of small size and low numbers of females have become increasingly common in recent years, and apprehension over the long-term health of the stock has grown within the drainage. In response to these reports, the Salmon Size Subcommittee of the US/Canada Yukon River Joint Technical Committee was formed and charged with advising the Committee, and thereby the US/Canada Yukon River Panel, with respect to changes in Chinook salmon age, sex, and size composition. This report, which summarizes the findings of prior investigations and the scientific...
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These data describe areas of suitable habitat believed to be used (currently and historically) by wild, natural, and/or hatchery fish populations. The term "currently" is defined as within the past five reproductive cycles. See the 'USETYPE' field description to differentiate between current and historic distribution. This information is based on extensive surveys, the best professional judgment of ODFW staff biologists and where possible, the professional opinions of staff from other natural resource agencies. Due to natural variations in run size, water conditions, or other environmental factors, some areas displayed may not be used by a species of fish on an annual basis. The Natural Resources Information Management...


map background search result map search result map British Columbia Salmon Conservation Units WOPR Fall Chinook Distribution Arc North Pacific LCC Prioritization Input:  Wild Chinook Abundance Estimate, 1998-2005 Potential Causes of Size Trends in Yukon River Chinook Salmon Populations Estimates of total annual return of Chinook salmon to the Kuskokwim River, 2002-2007 2003 Yukon River Chinook Telemetry Surveys in the Tr’ondek Hwech’in Traditional Territory Marine Arctic polygon distribution of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (Walbaum, 1792) WOPR Fall Chinook Distribution Arc Estimates of total annual return of Chinook salmon to the Kuskokwim River, 2002-2007 2003 Yukon River Chinook Telemetry Surveys in the Tr’ondek Hwech’in Traditional Territory British Columbia Salmon Conservation Units Potential Causes of Size Trends in Yukon River Chinook Salmon Populations North Pacific LCC Prioritization Input:  Wild Chinook Abundance Estimate, 1998-2005 Marine Arctic polygon distribution of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (Walbaum, 1792)