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Understanding the physiological impacts of climate change on arid lands species is a critical step towards ensuring the resilience and persistence of such species under changing temperature and moisture regimes. Varying degrees of vulnerability among different species will largely determine their future distributions in the face of climate change. Studies have indicated that Northern Mexico and the Southwestern United States are likely to become climate change hotspots, experiencing significantly drier and warmer average conditions by the end of the 21st century. However, relatively few studies have examined specifically the physiological effects of climate change on species inhabiting this region. This manuscript...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
These data are netcdf files of the projected timing of the onset of thermal stress severe enough (>8 Degree Heating Weeks) to cause coral bleaching 2x per decade and 10x per decade (annual) under emissions scenarios RCP8.5 and RCP4.5. The projected timing (a year between 2006 and 2100) is the data value. Values are only shown for the ~60,000 four-km pixels where coral reefs are known to occur.
The dataset summarizes total area (km2) and proportion of Central Valley waterbird habitat, summed across individual waterbird habitats (i.e., wetland and cropland types), that was available for each of 17 projected scenarios. The dataset also includes relatively recent (year 2005) area of existing habitat (i.e., “existing area”) for comparison with areas based on scenarios. Analysis was conducted for the projection period including water-years 2006–2099 (water-year defined as October-December and January–September of the following year). Because habitat areas vary through the season with timing of crop harvest and flooding of wetlands and post-harvested fields, annual areas and proportions represent summation...
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As the impacts of climate change amplify, understanding the consequences for wetlands will be critical for their sustainable management and conservation, particularly in arid regions such as the Columbia Plateau. The depressional wetlands in this region (wetlands located in topographic depressions where water can accumulate) are an important source of surface water during the summer months. However, their health depends directly on precipitation and evaporation, making them susceptible to changes in temperature and precipitation. Yet few tools for monitoring water movement patterns (hydrology) in and out of these landscapes currently exist, hindering efforts to model how they are changing. This project provided...
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FY2017There is an increasing concern and need for the conservation of springsnails and other endemic mollusks and for conservation of the unique spring and springbrook habitats on which they depend (Hershler et al 2014; Abele 2011). Nationwide, several of these species have been listed as endangered or threatened under provisions of the ESA; others are candidates for federal listing or are undergoing review by USFWS for possible future listing actions. These species can be particularly susceptible to localized threats and specific knowledge necessary for effective site-based conservation is often limited or lacking.Springsnail are particularly susceptible to extinction because the entire population of any single...
Population changes and shifts in geographic range boundaries induced by climate change have been documented for many insect species. On the basis of such studies, ecological forecasting models predict that, in the absence of dispersal and resource barriers, many species will exhibit large shifts in abundance and geographic range in response to warming. However, species are composed of individual populations, which may be subject to different selection pressures and therefore may be differentially responsive to environmental change. Asystematic responses across populations and species to warming will alter ecological communities differently across space. Common garden experiments can provide a more mechanistic understanding...
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The Department of the Interior and the U.S. Geological Survey have made it a priority to train the next generation of scientists and resource managers. The DOI Climate Science Centers (CSCs) are working to contribute to this initiative by building and supporting a network of students across the country who are interested in understanding climate impacts and adaptation. This project will support the development of a national communications and networking resource for early career scientists, managers, and conservation practitioners. The goal of this project is to facilitate and increase information sharing across the eight regional CSCs and consortium institutions. This will be achieved by working with and expanding...
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This data table contains mean decomposition rates and mean carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types buried in 7 marshes during 2015. Note that C:N data are repeated for low and high marsh areas at each site in the table. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
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This data set contains decomposition rates for litter of Salicornia pacifica, Distichlis spicata, and Deschampsia cespitosa buried at 7 tidal marsh sites in 2015. Sediment organic matter values were collected at a subset of sites. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
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The percentage difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on April 1 for the reference (1989-2011) climate period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on April 1 for the T4 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1752-1688.12304/abstract): The hydrologic response to statistically downscaled general circulation model simulations of daily surface climate and land cover through 2099 was assessed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin located in the southeastern United States. Projections of climate, urbanization, vegetation, and surface-depression storage capacity were used as inputs to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System to simulate projected impacts on hydrologic response. Surface runoff substantially increased when land cover change was applied. However, once the surface depression storage was added to mitigate the land cover change and increases...
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Globally, changing fire regimes due to climate is one of the greatest threats to ecosystems and society. This dataset presents projections of historic and future fire probability for the southcentral U.S. using downscaled climate projections and the Physical Chemistry Fire Frequency Model (PC2FM, Guyette et al., 2012). Climate data from 1900-1929 and projected climate data for 2040-2069 and 2070-2099 were used as model inputs to the Physical Chemistry Fire Frequency Model (Guyette et al. 2012) to estimate fire probability. Baseline and future time period data are from three global climate models (GCMs): CGCM, GFDL, and HadCM3. The nine associated data sets (tiffs) represent estimated change in mean fire probability...
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The dataset describes rangeland monitoring results from the Hanksville, UT (USA) area. Monitoring results consist of canopy cover of plant species and functional types according to ecological site group from 1967 to 2013. The study area is bordered on the north by the Wayne-Emery County line, on the west by Capitol Reef National Park, and on the south and east by the Colorado River, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Canyonlands National Park. Cover was estimated every 1 to 5 years (except the last measurement that had a 12 year interval) from 1967 to 2013 at 36 permanently marked sites in 15 livestock grazing allotments/pastures. Canopy cover of perennial plant species was estimated to the nearest tenth...
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This data release provides a set of Hydrological Simulation Program--Fortran (HSPF) model files representing 5 EPA-selected future climate change scenarios for each of two river basins: Taunton and Sudbury, in Massachusetts. Output from these models are intended for use as input to EPA Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) modeling. Climate scenarios, based on 2036-2065 change from 1975-2004 Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5, model effects of air temperature and precipitation changes (in degrees F for air temperature, in percent for precipitation) made to the input historical meteorological time series 1975-2004. Taunton meteorological data is from T.F. Green Airport and the...
Spatial and temporal mismatches between coarse resolution projections of global climate models (GCMs) and fine resolution data requirements of ecosystems models are the major obstacles for assessing the site-specific climatic impacts of climate change on natural resources and ecosystems. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop a simple method for statistically downscaling GCM monthly output at the native GCM grid scale to station-scale using transfer functions, and (ii) further demonstrate the site-specific impact assessment of climate change on water resources, soil erosion, and crop production at Kingfisher, OK, US using the water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model. Monthly precipitation and temperature...
Nuisance blooms of heterocystous Cyanobacteria in Lake Winnipeg have nearly doubled in size since the mid 1990s. The increases are the result of a recent rapid increase in loading and concentration of phosphorus. The rapid increase in phosphorus is largely the result of two factors. The first factor is the result of rapidly increased livestock production and use of synthetic fertilizer in the Red River Valley, with smaller contributions of phosphorus from the city of Winnipeg and other human development in the Red and Winnipeg river basins. The second factor is the increased frequency and intensity of spring floods in the Red River watershed in recent years, which have greatly enhanced the transfer of phosphorus...
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The Gulf of Alaska is one of the most productive marine ecosystems on Earth, supporting salmon fisheries that alone provide nearly $1 billion per year in economic benefits to Southeast Alaska. Glaciers are central to many of the area’s natural processes and economic activities, but the rates of glacier loss in Alaska are among the highest on Earth, with a 26-36 percent reduction in total volume expected by the end of the century. This project brought together scientists and managers at a workshop to synthesize the impacts of glacier change on the region’s coastal ecosystems and to determine related research and monitoring needs. Collected knowledge shows that melting glaciers are expected to have cascading effects...
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Description: The upper Gila River in New Mexico is one of the few unobstructed rivers in the Colorado River Basin with largely intact native fish populations, including four federally listed and one state listed species.Freshwater systems throughout the West continue to be threatened by human encroachment and water development. Methodologies or decision support tools to evaluate resource management practices that foster an understanding of how fish species adapt to the effects of climate change are critical to future resource management planning.
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The PFLCC has recently completed a set of comprehensive conservation planning scenarios for the state of Florida. This represents the first statewide effort to assess likely alternative futures for conservation considering an array of financial, biological, climatological and urbanistic conditions. These spatially explicit and temporal scenarios simulate both urban growth and climate change and identify the most suitable areas for conservation given the resulting land use pattern. Conservation allocations are based on both fee-title and conservation easements.The conservation priorities and mechanisms expressed in these scenarios are based on a wide set of contributing factors, and simulated conservation is purposefully...
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The PFLCC has recently completed a set of comprehensive conservation planning scenarios for the state of Florida. This represents the first statewide effort to assess likely alternative futures for conservation considering an array of financial, biological, climatological and urbanistic conditions. These spatially explicit and temporal scenarios simulate both urban growth and climate change and identify the most suitable areas for conservation given the resulting land use pattern. Conservation allocations are based on both fee-title and conservation easements.The conservation priorities and mechanisms expressed in these scenarios are based on a wide set of contributing factors, and simulated conservation is purposefully...


map background search result map search result map From Icefield to Ocean: Glacier Change Impacts to Alaska’s Coastal Ecosystems Physiological Effects of Climate Change on Species within the Desert LCC Can We Conserve Wetlands Under a Changing Climate? Mapping Wetland Hydrology in the Columbia Plateau Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Rangeland Ecology Monitoring Data, Utah, 1967-2013 Model climate scenario output Taunton and Sudbury river basins, Massachusetts, 2036-2065 change from 1975-2004, Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and 8.5 Decomposition rates and carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types, 2015 Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015 Science Brief for Resource Managers: Metacommunity Dynamics of Gila River Fishes Habitat Grids Statewide Impact Assessment Reports Future changes in southcentral U.S. wildfire probability due to climate change-Data Development of a Regional Springsnail Conservation Strategy Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Rangeland Ecology Monitoring Data, Utah, 1967-2013 Model climate scenario output Taunton and Sudbury river basins, Massachusetts, 2036-2065 change from 1975-2004, Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and 8.5 Science Brief for Resource Managers: Metacommunity Dynamics of Gila River Fishes Can We Conserve Wetlands Under a Changing Climate? Mapping Wetland Hydrology in the Columbia Plateau Habitat Grids Statewide Impact Assessment Reports Decomposition rates and carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types, 2015 Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015 Development of a Regional Springsnail Conservation Strategy From Icefield to Ocean: Glacier Change Impacts to Alaska’s Coastal Ecosystems Physiological Effects of Climate Change on Species within the Desert LCC Future changes in southcentral U.S. wildfire probability due to climate change-Data