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Prediction of coastal vulnerability is of increasing concern to policy makers, coastal managers and other stakeholders. Coastal regions and barrier islands along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are subject to frequent, large storms, whose waves and storm surge can dramatically alter beach morphology, threaten infrastructure, and impact local economies. Given that precise forecasts of regional hazards are challenging, because of the complex interactions between processes on many scales, a range of probable geomorphic change in response to storm conditions is often more helpful than deterministic predictions. Site-specific probabilistic models of coastal change are reliable because they are formulated with observations...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Coastal Engineering
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A set of empirical formulations is derived that describe important wave properties in shallow water as functions of commonly used parameters such as wave height, wave period, local water depth and local bed slope. These wave properties include time varying near-bed orbital velocities and statistical properties such as the distribution of wave height and wave period. Empirical expressions of characteristic wave parameters are derived on the basis of extensive analysis of field data using recently developed evolutionary algorithms. The field data covered a wide range of wave conditions, though there were few conditions with wave periods greater than 15 s. Comparison with field measurements showed good agreement both...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Coastal Engineering
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A coupled waves-currents-bathymetric evolution model (DELFT-3D) is compared with field measurements to test hypotheses regarding the processes responsible for alongshore varying nearshore morphological changes at seasonal time scales. A 2001 field experiment, along the beaches adjacent to Grays Harbor, Washington, USA, captured the transition between the high-energy erosive conditions of winter and the low-energy beach-building conditions typical of summer. The experiment documented shoreline progradation on the order of 10-20 m and on average approximately 70 m of onshore sandbar migration during a four-month period. Significant alongshore variability was observed in the morphological response of the sandbar over...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Coastal Engineering