Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Coastal hazards (X)

9 results (7ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.
thumbnail
The goal of this project is to quantify, at the National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables coastal geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tidal range, wave height, historical rates of relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables furnishes a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise. Data downloads available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds68/
thumbnail
The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise. Digital Data Series - 68
thumbnail
The western coastline of Alaska is highly susceptible to coastal storms, which can cause erosion, flooding, and saltwater storm surge, affecting natural ecosystems, human communities, and commercial activity. Historically, a large buffer of ice along the shoreline has protected this region from some of the more severe effects of coastal storms. However, climate change may not only increase the frequency and intensity of storms, but also cause a loss of shoreline ice, possibly increasing the incidence of coastal erosion and flooding and introducing saltwater to freshwater environments. These hazards have the potential to substantially disrupt the environment and commerce in the region, but more information is needed...
thumbnail
The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.
thumbnail
The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.
thumbnail
The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.
thumbnail
Water is a key resource in Alaska: Although it comprises 17 percent of the country’s land area, Alaska contains more than 40 percent of the United States’ surface water. Climate changes are anticipated to greatly impact water processes (hydrology), including water temperature and seasonal precipitation patterns and amounts. Understanding the likely impacts of climate change on hydrology is an important first step toward understanding consequent impacts on natural and human communities. The purpose of this project was to assist with the development of a coordinated state-wide approach for monitoring temperature in streams and lakes. This process was guided by the recommendations of a workshop involving hydrologists,...


    map background search result map search result map Modeling Western Alaska Coastal Hazards Coastal Vulnerability USGS National Index of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise in the Gulf of Mexico Wave Height Data for the Gulf of Mexico Tidal Range Data for the Gulf of Mexico Monitoring Alaska Stream and Lake Temperatures to Understand Future Conditions Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: A Preliminary Database for the U.S. Gulf Coast Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise: A Preliminary Database for the U.S. Gulf Coast National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise in the Gulf of Mexico Wave Height Data for the Gulf of Mexico Tidal Range Data for the Gulf of Mexico Modeling Western Alaska Coastal Hazards Monitoring Alaska Stream and Lake Temperatures to Understand Future Conditions USGS National Index of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise Coastal Vulnerability