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Filters: Tags: Earth and Planetary Science Letters (X) > partyWithName: C.E. Hedge (X)

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The 87Sr/86Sr ratios have been determined in 22 volcanic rocks from Oregon and Washington. The emphasis of the study was on andesites and dacites, but several basalts were included. Most of the samples have a very limited range in strontium isotopic composition and all fall within variations previously defined for oceanic basalts. There are no systematic differences between lavas erupted through the pre-Cenozoic basement and those erupted in the Columbia River Embayment. It is concluded that the role played by crustal rocks in the generation of these andesites and dacites is minor or nonexistent, but assimiliation of crustal material may have been a factor for some of the basalts of the Columbia River Group. ??...
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Isla Tortuga is a small isolated central volcano which is located near an actively spreading trough in the Gulf of California. The basalt lavas from Tortuga which have the highest Mg/Fe and Ni contents have trace element abundances and ratios and 87Sr/86Sr which are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge tholeiite. The major element, rare earth element and Sr abundances of fractionated tholeiite (low Mg/Fe) and tholeiitic andesite of Tortuga are consistent with an origin by closed-system fractional crystallization. This hypothesis is not supported by K, Na, Rb and Ba abundances in the lavas nor by their variable 87Sr/86Sr (0.7024-0.7035). It is proposed that the apparent decoupling of light rare earth elements, other...
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87Sr/86Sr ratios of basalts from islands in the Indian Ocean (0.7040) are higher than those of basalts dredged from the Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge (0.7034). The sources of the island basalts have apparently not been in equilibrium with the source of the ridge basalts for roughly 109 years. Both ridge and island basalts in the Indian Ocean are higher in 87Sr/86Sr than are rocks from similar settings in the eastern Pacific. ?? 1973.
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Oxygen, carbon and strontium isotope ratios point to a ground-water origin for the carbonates found in Hawaiian Volcanic Series rocks. Strontium isotope ratios in the xenoliths and host basalts indicate a genetic relationship between them. ?? 1970.
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The 87Sr 86Sr ratios of Mid-Indian Oceanic Ridge (MIOR) basalts are nearly identical (0.7032 to 0.7035), with the exception of one more highly radiogenic sample (0.7043). These values are consistently higher than the strontium isotopic ratios of the ridge basalts from Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, suggesting that the source of the MIOR basalts was depleted in alkalies more recently and/or to a lesser degree than the basalts from other oceans. ?? 1973.
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Analyses of rim-to-interior samples of fresh tholeiitic pillow basalts, deuterically altered holocrystalline basalts, and older, weathered tholeiitic basalts from the deep sea indicate that 87Sr 86Sr ratios of the older basalts are raised by low temperature interaction with strontium dissolved in sea water. 87Sr 86Sr correlates positively with H2O in these basalts; however, there is little detectable modification of the strontium isotope composition in rocks with H2O contents less than 1%. The isotope changes appear to be a function of relatively long-term, low-temperature weathering, rather than high-temperature or deuteric alteration. Strontium abundance and isotopic data for these rocks suggest that strontium...
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Rb and Sr contents and 87Sr/86Sr values were determined for samples of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks, mostly graywackes, from Oregon and California. These data are compatible with the theory of anataxis of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks in orogenic belts to produce granitic magmas provided that the melting occurs within several hundreds of m.y. after sedimentation. The low (87Sr/86Sr)0 values of the eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks are related to the significant amounts of volcanogenic detritus present which probably were originally derived from the mantle. ?? 1967.
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Basalts being erupted in the Pacific Ocean Basin vary in Sr isotopic composition in a simple geographic pattern. 87Sr/86Sr increases away from the East Pacific Rise to very high values for islands in the south-central Pacific. The 87Sr/86Sr variations are almost certainly related to past segregation of Rb, K, and other large cations. The segregation process was probably incipient partial melting which resulted in various mantle zones being enriched or depleted. ?? 1978.