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Interest in the restoration of second-growth forests has continued to increase in the redwood region, which has further increased the importance of evaluating restoration-based silvicultural strategies. This study assessed the short-term effectiveness of four silvicultural treatments (two silvicultural thinning methods, low thinning and crown thinning, and two basal area retentions, 80 percent and 45 percent) as forest restoration tools via analysis of relative basal area growth at Redwood National Park. Prior to treatment, the second-growth stand had more than 1,600 trees ha-1 and 70.0 m2 ha-1 basal area and consisted primarily of two species, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii(Mirb.) Franco) (the dominant species)...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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No abstract available at this time
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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Prescribed fire is a valuable tool in the restoration and management of oak savannas. BEHAVE, a fire behavior prediction system developed by the United States Forest Service, can be a useful tool when managing oak savannas with prescribed fire. BEHAVE predictions of fire rate-of-spread and flame length were validated using four standardized fuel models: Fuel Model 1 (short grass), Fuel Model 2 (timber and grass), Fuel Model 3 (tall grass), and Fuel Model 9 (hardwood litter). Also, a customized oak savanna fuel model (COSFM) was created and validated. Results indicate that standardized fuel model 2 and the COSFM reliably estimate mean rate-of-spread (MROS). The COSFM did not appreciably reduce MROS variation when...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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Decades of study on climatic change and its direct and indirect effects on forest ecosystems provide important insights for forest science, management, and policy. A synthesis of recent research from the northeastern United States and eastern Canada shows that the climate of the region has become warmer and wetter over the past 100 years and that there are more extreme precipitation events. Greater change is projected in the future. The amount of projected future change depends on the emissions scenarios used. Tree species composition of northeast forests has shifted slowly in response to climate for thousands of years. However, current human-accelerated climate change is much more rapid and it is unclear how forests...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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Hydrologic process are the main determinants of the type of wetland located on a site. Precipitation, groundwater, or flooding interact with soil properties and geomorphic setting to yield a complex matrix of conditions that control groundwater flux, water storage and discharge, water chemistry, biotic productivity, biodiversity, and biogeochemical cycling. Hydroperiod affects many abiotic factors that in turn determine plant and animal species composition, biodiversity, primary and secondary productivity, accumulation, of organic matter, and nutrient cycling. Because the hydrologic regime has a major influence on wetland functioning, understanding how hydrologic changes influence ecosystem processes is essential,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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Hemlock ravines in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA) are highly valued because of their distinctive aesthetic, recreational and ecological qualities. We conducted a comparative study designed to determine the potential long-term consequences to aquatic communities of the suspected transition from hemlock-dominated forests to mixed hardwood forests as a result of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) induced mortality. A landscape analysis of DEWA using Geographic Information Systems (GIs) was used to select 14 hemlock and hardwood site-pairs that were similar in topography (i.e., slope, terrain shape, aspect, light levels) and stream size (first or second order) but differed in forest composition....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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To promote desired forest conditions that enhance wildlife habitat in bottomland forests, managers prescribed and implemented variable-retention harvest, a.k.a. wildlife forestry, in four stands on Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge, LA. These treatments created canopy openings (gaps) within which managers sought to regenerate shade-intolerant trees. Six years after prescribed harvests, we assessed regeneration in 41 canopy gaps and 4 large (>0.5-ha) patch cut openings that resulted from treatments and in 21 natural canopy gaps on 2 unharvested control stands. Mean gap area of anthropogenic gaps (582 m²) was greater than that of natural gaps (262 m²). Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and red oaks (Quercus nigra,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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This report describes the "Program for Regional and International Shorebird Monitoring" (PRISM). PRISM is being implemented by a Canada-United States Shorebird Monitoring and Assessment Committee formed in 2001 by the Canadian Shorebird Working Group and the U.S. Shorebird Council. PRISM provides a single blueprint for implementing the shorebird conservation plans recently completed in Canada and the United States. The goals of PRISM are to (1) estimate the size of breeding population of 74 shorebird taxa in North America; (2) describe the distribution, abundance, and habitat relationships for each of these taxa; (3) monitor trends in shorebird population size; (4) monitor shorebird numbers at stopover locations,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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No abstract available at this time
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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No abstract available at this time
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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Climate change is expected to alter the composition, structure, and function of forested ecosystems in the United States (Vose et al. 2012). Increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide [CO2]) and temperature, as well as altered precipitation and disturbance regimes (e.g., fire, insects, pathogens, and windstorms), are expected to have profound effects on biodiversity, socioeconomics, and the delivery of ecosystem services within the Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP, or Plan) area over the next century (Dale et al. 2001, Franklin et al. 1991). The ecological interactions and diversity of biophysical settings in the region are complex. The effects of climate change on ecological processes...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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The distribution and abundance of a species across a landscape depends, in part, on the distribution and abundance of appropriate habitat. If basic resource needs such as food, water, and cover are not present, then that species is excluded from the area. Scarcity of appropriate habitat is generally the key reason for the status of most rare and endangered species. An understanding of an endangered species’ habitat characteristics is crucial to effective management, conservation and recovery.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report
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The projected rapid changes in climate will affect the unique vegetation assemblages of the Northern Rockies region in myriad ways, both directly through shifts in vegetation growth, mortality, and regeneration, and indirectly through changes in disturbance regimes and interactions with changes in other ecosystem processes, such as hydrology, snow dynamics, and exotic invasions (Bonan 2008; Hansen and Phillips 2015; Hansen et al. 2001; Notaro et al. 2007). These impacts, taken collectively, could change the way vegetation is managed by public land agencies in this area. Some species may be in danger of rapid decreases in abundance, while others may undergo range expansion (Landhäusser et al. 2010). New vegetation...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: General Technical Report


map background search result map search result map Changing climate, changing forests: the impacts of climate change on forests of the northeastern United States and eastern Canada Relationship of Eastern hemlock (<i>Tsuga canadensis</i>) to the ecology of small streams in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Hydrology Relationship of Eastern hemlock (<i>Tsuga canadensis</i>) to the ecology of small streams in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Hydrology Changing climate, changing forests: the impacts of climate change on forests of the northeastern United States and eastern Canada