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This set of sixteen Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM)and Operational Land Imager (OLI)(Path 014 and Rows 032 and 033) surface reflectance data sets were collected between 2000 and 2015. This data presents a time-series analysis that uses linear spectral unmixing of composite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, Normalized Difference Water Index, and Normalized Difference Soil Index data, to estimate the percentages of marsh vegetation, water, and exposed marsh substrate on the New Jersey intracoastal marshes. We used the composition of the marshes in terms of the percentage of marsh vegetation, water, and marsh substrate to produce Marsh Surface Condition Index (MSCI) maps consisting of three classes of marshes: severely...
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As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is expanding National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability of coastal wetlands to various factors and to evaluate their ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), New Jersey, was selected as a pilot study area. As part of this data synthesis effort, hydrodynamic and sediment transport...
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Natural and anthropogenic contaminants, pathogens, and viruses are found in soils and sediments throughout the United States. Enhanced dispersion and concentration of these environmental health stressors in coastal regions can result from sea level rise and storm-derived disturbances. The combination of existing environmental health stressors and those mobilized by natural or anthropogenic disasters could adversely impact the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems. This dataset displays the exposure potential to environmental health stressors in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Exposure...
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These are two land cover datasets derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper and Operational Land Imager (spatial resolution 30-m)Path 014 and Rows 032 and 033 surface reflectance data collected on July 14, 2011 and July 19, 2013, before and after Hurricane Sandy made landfall near Brigantine, New Jersey on October 29, 2012. The two land cover data sets provide a means of evaluating the effect of Hurricane Sandy of data sets collected at times that represent or approach peak vegetation growth. The most accurate results of the land cover classification are based on twelve classes, some of which occur adjacent to the marshes but not on the New Jersey intracoastal marshes. Twelve classes were used in the supervised maximum...
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Natural and anthropogenic contaminants, pathogens, and viruses are found in soils and sediments throughout the United States. Enhanced dispersion and concentration of these environmental health stressors in coastal regions can result from sea level rise and storm-derived disturbances. The combination of existing environmental health stressors and those mobilized by natural or anthropogenic disasters could adversely impact the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems. This dataset displays the exposure potential to environmental health stressors in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Exposure...
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This USGS Data Release represents geospatial data sets that were created for the analysis of the effect of Hurricane Sandy on New Jersey Atlantic Coastal Marshes. The following listed image products were generated: 1) Fifteen marsh surface condition index (MSCI) data sets were calculated from yearly summer collections of ETM+ image data from 2000 to 2015. Three classes described the results of the MSCI mapping; classs1-severely impacted, class 2-moderately impacted, and class 3-intact marsh. 2) Marsh change data product using Landsat images of July 14, 2011 (before) and July 19, 2013 (after) Hurricane Sandy is based on the difference in the percentage of vegetation. It shows a pattern of an increasing loss of marsh...
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The change detection data is the classified difference in the percentage of vegetation on the July 14, 2011 Landsat Thematic Mapper(TM) data set collected before Hurricane Sandy and the July 19, 2013 Landsat Operational Land Imager (OLI)data set collected after Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy made landfall near Brigandine, New Jersey on October 29, 2012. The actual difference in the percentage of vegetation is used in the calculation, not the three-class classification that is the basis of the Marsh Surface Condition Index data. The eleven classes consist of five classes (5-20%,>20%-40%,>40%-60%,>60%-80%,>80%)with decreases in the percentage of vegetation cover after Hurricane Sandy, Three classes (5-20%,>20%-40%,>40%-60%)with...
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The salt marsh complex of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay (New Jersey, USA), was delineated to smaller, conceptual marsh units by geoprocessing of surface elevation data. Flow accumulation based on the relative elevation of each location is used to determine the ridge lines that separate each marsh unit while the surface slope is used to automatically assign each unit a drainage point, where water is expected to drain through. Through scientific efforts associated with the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey has started to expand national assessment of coastal change hazards and forecast products to coastal...
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Biomass production is positively correlated with mean tidal range in salt marshes along the Atlantic coast of the United States of America. Recent studies support the idea that enhanced stability of the marshes can be attributed to increased vegetative growth due to increased tidal range. This dataset displays the spatial variation mean tidal range (i.e. Mean Range of Tides, MN) in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. MN was based on the calculated difference in height between mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) using the VDatum (v3.5) software (http://vdatum.noaa.gov/). The input elevation was set...
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As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is expanding National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability of coastal wetlands to various factors and to evaluate their ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), New Jersey, was selected as a pilot study area. As part of this data synthesis effort, hydrodynamic and sediment transport...
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Biomass production is positively correlated with mean tidal range in salt marshes along the Atlantic coast of the United States of America. Recent studies support the idea that enhanced stability of the marshes can be attributed to increased vegetative growth due to increased tidal range. This dataset displays the spatial variation mean tidal range (i.e. Mean Range of Tides, MN) in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. MN was based on the calculated difference in height between mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) using the VDatum (v3.5) software (http://vdatum.noaa.gov/). The input elevation was set...
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As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is expanding National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability of coastal wetlands to various factors and to evaluate their ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), New Jersey, was selected as a pilot study area. As part of this data synthesis effort, hydrodynamic and sediment transport...
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Water quality in the Barnegat Bay estuary along the New Jersey coast is the focus of a multidisciplinary research project begun in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. This narrow estuary is the drainage for the Barnegat Bay watershed and flushed by just three inlets connecting it to the Atlantic Ocean, is experiencing degraded water quality, algal blooms, loss of seagrass, and increases in oxygen-depletion events. The scale of the estuary and the scope of the problems within it required a regional approach to understand and model water circulation within the bay and adjacent ocean. A continuous elevation surface (terrain model) integrating...
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As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is expanding National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability of coastal wetlands to various factors and to evaluate their ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), New Jersey, was selected as a pilot study area. As part of this data synthesis effort, hydrodynamic and sediment transport...
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As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is expanding National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability of coastal wetlands to various factors and to evaluate their ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), New Jersey, was selected as a pilot study area. As part of this data synthesis effort, hydrodynamic and sediment transport...
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Natural and anthropogenic contaminants, pathogens, and viruses are found in soils and sediments throughout the United States. Enhanced dispersion and concentration of these environmental health stressors in coastal regions can result from sea level rise and storm-derived disturbances. The combination of existing environmental health stressors and those mobilized by natural or anthropogenic disasters could adversely impact the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems. This dataset displays the exposure potential to environmental health stressors in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Exposure...
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Biomass production is positively correlated with mean tidal range in salt marshes along the Atlantic coast of the United States of America. Recent studies support the idea that enhanced stability of the marshes can be attributed to increased vegetative growth due to increased tidal range. This dataset displays the spatial variation mean tidal range (i.e. Mean Range of Tides, MN) in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. MN was based on the calculated difference in height between mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) using the VDatum (v3.5) software (http://vdatum.noaa.gov/). The input elevation was set...


    map background search result map search result map Continuous terrain model for water circulation studies, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey Conceptual salt marsh units for wetland synthesis: Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Mean tidal range in salt marsh units of Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Raster image of mean tidal range in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (32-bit GeoTIFF) Mean tidal range in salt marsh units of Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (polygon shapefile) Analysis of the effect of Hurricane Sandy on New Jersey Atlantic coastal marshes based on landsat thematic mapper and operational land imager data: 2000-2015 Marsh surface condition index dataset Marsh change dataset Land cover classification dataset Exposure potential of saltmarsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors (polygon shapefile) Exposure potential of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors Raster image of exposure potential to environmental health stressors in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (32-bit GeoTIFF) Wetland data layers derived from Barnegat Bay Little Egg Harbor hydrodynamic model Inferred hydrodynamic residence time in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Change in salinity in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Change in salinity exposure of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Change in suspended sediment concentration over the salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Conceptual salt marsh units for wetland synthesis: Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Mean tidal range in salt marsh units of Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (polygon shapefile) Inferred hydrodynamic residence time in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Change in salinity in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Change in salinity exposure of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Change in suspended sediment concentration over the salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Mean tidal range in salt marsh units of Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Exposure potential of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors Wetland data layers derived from Barnegat Bay Little Egg Harbor hydrodynamic model Exposure potential of saltmarsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors (polygon shapefile) Raster image of mean tidal range in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (32-bit GeoTIFF) Raster image of exposure potential to environmental health stressors in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (32-bit GeoTIFF) Continuous terrain model for water circulation studies, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey Analysis of the effect of Hurricane Sandy on New Jersey Atlantic coastal marshes based on landsat thematic mapper and operational land imager data: 2000-2015 Marsh surface condition index dataset Marsh change dataset Land cover classification dataset