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This dataset consists of raster geotiff outputs from modeling vertical accretion and carbon accumulation in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington, USA. These rasters represent projections of future habitat type, change in surface elevation above Mean Sea Level, and total sediment carbon accumulation since 2011 in coastal wetland habitats. Projections were generated in 20-year increments for 100 years for five amounts of sea-level rise, three amounts of suspended sediment concentrations, and two alternative configurations of the U.S. Interstate-5 causeway as it crosses the Nisqually River to either prevent or allow inland habitat migration (a total of 30 scenarios). The full methods and results are described in detail...
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The U.S. Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research Center collected sediment and accretion data at a wave-exposed tidal salt marsh in South San Francisco Bay, California. Sediment traps and feldspar marker horizons (MH) were deployed along transects of increasing distance from the sediment source, at primary, secondary and tertiary marsh channels/bay. Data were collected bi-monthly over two month periods in summer 2021 and winter 2021/2022. Included here are trap and MH plot locations, calculated sediment fluxes at each station by deployment period, annual accretion rates, and covariates associated with sediment deposition and accretion including vegetation structure and elevation. This project aimed to assess...
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This dataset consists of raster geotiff outputs from modeling vertical accretion and carbon accumulation in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington, USA. These rasters represent projections of future habitat type, change in surface elevation above Mean Sea Level, and total sediment carbon accumulation since 2011 in coastal wetland habitats. Projections were generated in 20-year increments for 100 years for five amounts of sea-level rise, three amounts of suspended sediment concentrations, and two alternative configurations of the U.S. Interstate-5 causeway as it crosses the Nisqually River to either prevent or allow inland habitat migration (a total of 30 scenarios). The full methods and results are described in detail...
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Vertical accretion and elevation change of marshes is a critical factor controlling marsh survival and adaptability to rising sea levels. A wide variety of existing methods have been employed to measure accretion and elevation change in marshes on time scales ranging from weeks to centuries on many individual marshes located throughout the coastal northeastern United States. This dataset is a compilation of marsh accretion and elevation change rates compiled from a total of 27 published studies and 3 data sets published from 1975 through 2021, yielding a total of 292 individual estimates of marsh accretion or elevation change. The database includes: measurements of marsh surface elevation change from repeat surveys...
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This dataset consists of raster geotiff outputs from modeling vertical accretion and carbon accumulation in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington, USA. These rasters represent projections of future habitat type, change in surface elevation above Mean Sea Level, and total sediment carbon accumulation since 2011 in coastal wetland habitats. Projections were generated in 20-year increments for 100 years for five amounts of sea-level rise, three amounts of suspended sediment concentrations, and two alternative configurations of the U.S. Interstate-5 causeway as it crosses the Nisqually River to either prevent or allow inland habitat migration (a total of 30 scenarios). The full methods and results are described in detail...
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A critical factor controlling marsh survival and adaptability to rising sea level is an adequate supply of sediment for supporting upward growth of marshes, yet sediment availability and the factors that control its delivery to marshes remain poorly constrained. This dataset includes the results of sediment trap deployments and accompanying water level recordings from 9 coastal salt marshes in the northeastern United States. Sediment traps were deployed seasonally, with individual spring, summer, and fall deployment periods over the course of 2020-2021. The distribution of study sites spans differences in tidal range, wave climate, sea surface temperature, and assemblages of marine organisms. Additionally, these...
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Chloropyron maritimum subsp. maritimum population counts at Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, California, and tide and weather data from San Diego, California, are used to explain interannual variation in Chloropyron counts and to predict past population counts.


    map background search result map search result map Chloropyron maritimum subsp. maritimum population counts, tide, and weather data for Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge Projected future habitat of coastal wetlands in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington Projected future carbon accumulation of coastal wetlands in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington Projected future elevation change of coastal wetlands in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington Database of Sediment Accretion and Elevation Change Rates for Coastal Marshes of Northeastern United States, Derived from Studies Published from 1975 through 2022 Database of Sediment Mass Accumulation for Coastal Marshes of Northeastern United States from Sediment Trap Deployments during 2020 and 2021 Sediment Deposition and Accretion Data from a Tidal Salt Marsh in South San Francisco Bay, California 2021-2022 Projected future habitat of coastal wetlands in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington Projected future carbon accumulation of coastal wetlands in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington Projected future elevation change of coastal wetlands in the Nisqually River Delta, Washington Database of Sediment Mass Accumulation for Coastal Marshes of Northeastern United States from Sediment Trap Deployments during 2020 and 2021 Database of Sediment Accretion and Elevation Change Rates for Coastal Marshes of Northeastern United States, Derived from Studies Published from 1975 through 2022