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The Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC, http://www.greatplainslcc.org/) is a partnership that provides applied science and decision support tools to assist natural resource managers conserve plants, fish and wildlife in the mid- and short-grass prairie of the southern Great Plains. It is part of a national network of public-private partnerships — known as Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs, http://www.fws.gov/science/shc/lcc.html) — that work collaboratively across jurisdictions and political boundaries to leverage resources and share science capacity. The Great Plains LCC identifies science priorities for the region and helps foster science that addresses these priorities to support wildlife...
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This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States, 1980 to 1997. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created from 5,233 wells measured in both 1980 and 1997. The water-level-change contours were drawn manually on mylar at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The contours then were converted to a digital map.
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The water-budget-components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the,"Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006),and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 175,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This dataset consists of a raster of water-level changes for the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2013. This digital dataset was created using water-level measurements from 3,349 wells measured in both the predevelopment period (about 1950) and in 2013 and using other published information on water-level change in areas with few water-level measurements. The map was reviewed for consistency with the...
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The High Plains aquifer extends from south of about 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from about 96 degrees 30 minutes to 106 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 175,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This dataset consists of a raster of water-level changes for the High Plains aquifer, 2013 to 2015. This digital dataset was created using water-level measurements from 7,529 wells measured in both 2013 and 2015. The map was reviewed for consistency with the relevant data at a scale of 1:1,000,000.
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This data set is one of many developed in support of The High Plains Groundwater Availability Project and the U.S. Geological Survey Data Series report: titled Geodatabase Compilation of Hydrogeologic, Remote Sensing, and Water-Budget-Component data for the High Plains aquifer, 2011 (DS 777). This dataset contains point vector data of locations of 16,950 wells and 90,155 well log records located in areas overlying the northern High Plains aquifer in the United States. The northern High Plains aquifer underlies 61.7 million acres (96,400 square miles) in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. These data were acquired from different sources and synthesized together in one dataset. Included in this...
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The typical high plains of western Kansas, Western Oklahoma, and N.W. Texas. Abandoned house on horizon. 1897. Published in Twenty First Ann. Report. U.S. Geologic Survey, pt 4, 1899-1900, Pl 64. Page 610. (The Flat Uplands Subject Album V1, p42; v81, p36)
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The water-budget components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the, "Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006),and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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The High Plains aquifer extends from south of about 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from about 96 degrees 30 minutes to 106 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 175,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set is the supplemental water-level measurements from 1,897 wells located in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, or Texas and measured in various time periods, which were used to historical water-level change values for predevelopment to 2011 to 2014 and approximate water-level change values from predevelopment to 2015 to substantiate the map of water-level changes, predevelopment...
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The water-budget-components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the,"Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006), and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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This data set is one of many developed in support of The High Plains Groundwater Availability Project and the USGS Data Series Report: Geodatabase Compilation of Hydrogeologic, Remote Sensing, and Water-Budget-Component data for the High Plains aquifer, 2011 (DS 777). This dataset contains point vector data from the National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHD+) 1:100,000 stream polyline data converted into points and attributed with elevation values in feet above sea level.Streams were initially included if they had a mean estimated base flow of more than 10 cubic feet per second (based on streamflow data from long-term streamflow-gaging stations operated by the USGS or the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources)....
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The water-budget-components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the,"Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006), and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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The water-budget-components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the,"Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006), and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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This raster data set represents the saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer of the United States, 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies approximately 112.6 million acres (176,000 square miles) in parts of eight States: Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The aquifer's saturated thickness ranges from near zero to about 1,200 feet (Weeks and Gutentag, 1981). Water-level declines occurred in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the onset of substantial irrigation with groundwater (about 1950) (Luckey and others, 1981). This data set was generated in ESRI ArcInfo Workstation Version 9.3, which is a geographic information system (GIS), using an...
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This dataset is one of many developed in support of The High Plains Groundwater Availability Project and the U.S. Geological Survey Data Series Report: Geodatabase Compilation of Hydrogeologic, Remote Sensing, and Water-Budget-Component data for the High Plains aquifer, 2011 (DS777). This dataset represents a thickness-weighted average of hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific yield (Sy) for 4,309 well points in the northern High Plains aquifer. Hydraulic conductivity is a measure of how much water flows through a unit section of an aquifer, under a unit gradient in a specified amount of time. Specific yield is a measure of how much water will drain from the aquifer by gravity. Both of these properties are important...
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Conclusions: The study recorded flushing responses (whether or not an animal fled in response to disturbance) and flush distances of 6 species of diurnal raptors exposed to walking and vehicle disturbances in order to calculate minimum distances for species-specific buffer zones. In general, walking disturbances resulted in more flushing than vehicle disturbances for all species except the prairie falcon. For walking disturbances, a linear relationship existed between flight distance and body mass, with lighter species flushing at shorter distances; however, this trend did not hold for vehicle disturbance. Birds flushed at much shorter distances in response to approaching vehicles. Thresholds/Learnings: Buffer...
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This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2007. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created using water-level measurements from 3,643 wells measured in both predevelopment and 2007. The water-level-change contours were initially generated programmatically and then modified manually. The map was reviewed with the relevant...
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The water-budget-components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the,"Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006), and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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The water-budget-components geodatabase contains selected data from maps in the, "Selected Approaches to Estimate Water-Budget Components of the High Plains, 1940 through 1949 and 2000 through 2009" report (Stanton and others, 2011). Data were collected and synthesized from existing climate models including the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) (Daly and others, 1994), and the Snow accumulation and ablation model (SNOW-17) (Anderson, 2006),and used in soil-water balance models to compute various components of a water budget. The methodologies used to compute the averages and volumes for the data in this geodatabase are slightly different for different components and models.
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This digital data set consists of saturated thickness contours for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 106 degrees west longitude. The outcrop area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the saturated thickness contours from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology...


map background search result map search result map PLJV's Probable Playas Version 4 Response of wintering grassland raptors to human disturbance. DS-777 Average Annual Precipitation Data, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from an Inverse-Distance-Weighted (IDW) interpolation, for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Actual Evapotranspiration, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the National Weather Service (NWS) Snow Accumulation and Ablation (SNOW-17) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Potential Evapotranspiration, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the National Weather Service (NWS) Snow Accumulation and Ablation (SNOW-17) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Precipitation Data, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Precipitation data, 1940 to 1949, in inches estimated from the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Irrigation Withdrawals, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the Soil Water Balance (SWB) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Recharge, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the Soil Water Balance (SWB) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Spatial Location of Stream Elevations for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming DS-777 Thickness-Weighted Average of Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming DS-777 Locations of Wells and Well Log Records used to Develop the Base of the Northern High Plains Aquifer underlying Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1997 Digital map of saturated thickness in 1980 for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2007 Saturated thickness, High Plains aquifer, 2009 Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2013 (A3) Supplemental water-level change data used to substantiate the map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2015 (B1) Spatial data set of mapped water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 2013 to 2015 Response of wintering grassland raptors to human disturbance. DS-777 Thickness-Weighted Average of Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming DS-777 Spatial Location of Stream Elevations for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming DS-777 Locations of Wells and Well Log Records used to Develop the Base of the Northern High Plains Aquifer underlying Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming (A3) Supplemental water-level change data used to substantiate the map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2015 PLJV's Probable Playas Version 4 Digital map of saturated thickness in 1980 for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1997 Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2007 Saturated thickness, High Plains aquifer, 2009 Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, predevelopment (about 1950) to 2013 (B1) Spatial data set of mapped water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 2013 to 2015 DS-777 Average Annual Actual Evapotranspiration, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the National Weather Service (NWS) Snow Accumulation and Ablation (SNOW-17) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Potential Evapotranspiration, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the National Weather Service (NWS) Snow Accumulation and Ablation (SNOW-17) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Precipitation Data, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from an Inverse-Distance-Weighted (IDW) interpolation, for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Irrigation Withdrawals, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the Soil Water Balance (SWB) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Recharge, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the Soil Water Balance (SWB) Model for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Precipitation Data, 2000 to 2009, in inches estimated from the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming DS-777 Average Annual Precipitation data, 1940 to 1949, in inches estimated from the Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) for the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming