Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Hydrology (X)

4,104 results (9ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
This data provides an estimated raster surface of dissolved oxygen values across a region covered by an August 23, 2016 AUV survey. The raster was generated by using a natural neighbors interplator within a GIS on the empirical data set. This interpolator was chosen due to the non-normal distribution observed among the data, and its ability to produce smoother approximations than alternative interpolation methods. There are three files available for download in the 'Attached Files' section below. There is a zip file which contains the interpolated dissolved oxygen surface, an xml file which contains metadata, and a layer file which can be used to import the layer's symbology.
thumbnail
This dataset contains monthly crop irrigation requirement (CIR) values from March 1940 through 2014 for the 20 virtual land-use units, including the seven canal service units, in the Rio Grande Transboundary Integrated Hydrologic Model (RGTIHM). CIR values are presented in units of feet per day.
thumbnail
This point vector dataset represents 10 climate stations used for analysis of annual and seasonal precipitation, analysis of monthly measured reference evapotranspiration, and comparison of simulated potential evapotranspiration with measured reference evapotranspiration within the Rio Grande transboundary integrated hydrologic model and water-availability analysis, New Mexico and Texas, United States, and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico.
thumbnail
The basis for these features is U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5105 Flood-inundation maps for the Peckman River in the Townships of Verona, Cedar Grove, and Little Falls, and the Borough of Woodland Park, New Jersey, 2014.Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximate 7.5-mile reach of the Peckman River in New Jersey, which extends from Verona Lake Dam in the Township of Verona downstream through the Township of Cedar Grove and the Township of Little Falls to the confluence with the Passaic River in the Borough of Woodland Park, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Flood profiles were simulated...
thumbnail
This landing page contains peak-flow frequency analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center. Sets of analyses are published as data releases which are child items to this landing page.
thumbnail
The basis for these features is U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2017-5024 Flood Inundation Mapping Data for Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon. The domain of the HEC-RAS hydraulic model is a 12.9-mile reach of Johnson Creek from just upstream of SE 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon, to its confluence with the Willamette River. Some of the hydraulics used in the model were taken from Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2010, Flood Insurance Study, City of Portland, Oregon, Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington Counties, Volume 1 of 3, November 26, 2010. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) utilized for the project was developed from lidar data flown in 2015 and provided by the Oregon Department...
thumbnail
This data release contains coastal wetland synthesis products for the geographic region from Jamaica Bay to western Great South Bay, located in southeastern New York State. Metrics for resiliency, including unvegetated to vegetated ratio (UVVR), marsh elevation, and mean tidal range, are calculated for smaller units delineated from a Digital Elevation Model, providing the spatial variability of physical factors that influence wetland health. Through scientific efforts initiated with the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey has been expanding national assessment of coastal change hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands with the intent of providing Federal, State, and local managers with...
thumbnail
‚ÄčThe basis for these features is U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2017-5024 Flood Inundation Mapping Data for Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon. The domain of the HEC-RAS hydraulic model is a 12.9-mile reach of Johnson Creek from just upstream of SE 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon, to its confluence with the Willamette River. Some of the hydraulics used in the model were taken from Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2010, Flood Insurance Study, City of Portland, Oregon, Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington Counties, Volume 1 of 3, November 26, 2010. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) utilized for the project was developed from lidar data flown in 2015 and provided by the Oregon Department...
thumbnail
IMPORTANT NOTE: A more recent version of this data release is available from this link. This data release is the update of the U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase data release by Bera and Over (2016), with the processed data through September 30, 2015. The primary data for each year is downloaded from the ANL website (http://gonzalo.er.anl.gov/ANLMET/numeric/) and is processed following the guidelines documented in Over and others (2010) and Bera (2014). Hourly potential evapotranspiration computed using the computer program LXPET (Lamoreux Potential Evapotranspiration). Murphy (2005) describes in detail the computer program LXPET. References Cited: ...
thumbnail
Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
thumbnail
Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
thumbnail
Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
thumbnail
Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
thumbnail
Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model Mc1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), Water leached in the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. the output is prsented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain....
thumbnail
The U.S. Geological Survey collected topographic data in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assist in the management of two recreation areas at Blue Mountain Lake and near Nimrod Lake in Arkansas. Data were collected March 3-4, 2020 using terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-lidar) surveying equipment, Global navigation Satellite System (GNSS) surveying equipment, and conventional surveying techniques. The surveyed locations had a parking area, boat ramp, and some small recreational structures. Each site was surveyed using a FARO 3D tripod-mounted T-lidar unit. Additionally, a topographic survey was conducted in order to georeference the lidar survey. These topographic data were collected...
thumbnail
This data release is the update of the U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase data release by Bera and Over (2018), with the data processed through September 30, 2018. The primary data for water year 2018 (a water year is the 12-month period, October 1 through September 30, designated by the calendar year in which it ends) were downloaded from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) (Argonne National Laboratory, 2018) and processed following the guidelines documented in Over and others (2010). Daily potential evapotranspiration (PET) is computed from average daily air temperature, average daily dewpoint temperature, daily total wind speed, and daily total solar radiation, and disaggregated to hourly PET by using the...
The U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) model was applied to basins in 14 different hydroclimatic regions to determine the sensitivity and variability of the freshwater resources of the United States in the face of current climate-change projections. Rather than attempting to choose a most likely scenario from the results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an ensemble of climate simulations from five models under three emissions scenarios each was used to drive the basin models. Climate-change scenarios were generated for PRMS by modifying historical precipitation and temperature inputs; mean monthly climate change was derived by calculating changes in mean climates...
This report cannot possibly cover all the issues of concern in the Colorado River basin. The basin is vast and diverse geographically, ethnically, and politically. Conflicts over water are part of its history, as water has been the defining resource in the settlement and development of the Colorado River basin. A complex set of laws, a treaty, court decrees, contracts, agreements, regulations and traditions of use have evolved over this past century which have governed water policy and management decisions. Over the last few decades, new social values have emerged in the basin and across the country which reflect an appreciation of the important functions of river systems along with a desire to preserve this natural...
thumbnail
This data release provides a set of Hydrological Simulation Program--Fortran (HSPF) model files representing 5 EPA-selected future climate change scenarios for each of two river basins: Taunton and Sudbury, in Massachusetts. Output from these models are intended for use as input to EPA Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) modeling. Climate scenarios, based on 2036-2065 change from 1975-2004 Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5, model effects of air temperature and precipitation changes (in degrees F for air temperature, in percent for precipitation) made to the input historical meteorological time series 1975-2004. Taunton meteorological data is from T.F. Green Airport and the...
thumbnail
Gridded fields of changes in discharge due to historical deforestation and conversion to agriculture from Douglas et al. (2005). This historical scenario compared discharge (Q) generated from pre-industrial land cover with discharge derived from contemporary landcover. Change in Q = difference between river discharge (Q) generated from pre-industrial land cover (based on WWF Terrestrial Ecoregions of the World (Olson et al., 2001) with river discharge derived from contemporary landcover. Historical and contemporary Q was estimated from flow routed RO generated by the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group Water Balance Model (WBM) at a 30' (lat x long) spatial resolution (Fekete et al. 2002). Citations in dataset history.


map background search result map search result map Historical Change In River Discharge due to Deforestation (km3/yr) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Meteorological Database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, January 1, 1948 - September 30, 2015 Model climate scenario output Taunton and Sudbury river basins, Massachusetts, 2036-2065 change from 1975-2004, Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and 8.5 Peak-Flow Frequency Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center Areas of uncertainty for flood inundation extents at gage 14211500, Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon (sycor_breach.shp) Flood inundation depth for a flow of 2,578 cfs (stage 15) at gage 14211500, Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon (sycor_15.tif) Flood inundation depth for a gage height of 6.5 ft at gage 01389534, Peckman River at Ozone Avenue at Verona, New Jersey (pecknj_08) August 23, 2016 AUV Survey - Dissolved Oxygen Surface Climate Stations for the Rio Grande transboundary integrated hydrologic model and water-availability analysis, New Mexico and Texas, United States, and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico RGTIHM CIR Meteorological Database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, January 1, 1948 - September 30, 2018 Coastal wetlands from Jamaica Bay to western Great South Bay, New York Terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging Topographic Survey Data for Two Recreation Areas Near Blue Mountain Lake and Nimrod Lake, Arkansas, March 2020 Flood inundation depth for a gage height of 6.5 ft at gage 01389534, Peckman River at Ozone Avenue at Verona, New Jersey (pecknj_08) August 23, 2016 AUV Survey - Dissolved Oxygen Surface Areas of uncertainty for flood inundation extents at gage 14211500, Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon (sycor_breach.shp) Flood inundation depth for a flow of 2,578 cfs (stage 15) at gage 14211500, Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon (sycor_15.tif) Coastal wetlands from Jamaica Bay to western Great South Bay, New York Terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging Topographic Survey Data for Two Recreation Areas Near Blue Mountain Lake and Nimrod Lake, Arkansas, March 2020 Model climate scenario output Taunton and Sudbury river basins, Massachusetts, 2036-2065 change from 1975-2004, Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and 8.5 Climate Stations for the Rio Grande transboundary integrated hydrologic model and water-availability analysis, New Mexico and Texas, United States, and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico RGTIHM CIR Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Peak-Flow Frequency Analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center Historical Change In River Discharge due to Deforestation (km3/yr)