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The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy (hereafter Strategy, DOI 2015) outlined the need for coordinated, science-based adaptive management to achieve long-term protection, conservation, and restoration of the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem. A key component of this management approach is the identification of knowledge gaps that limit implementation of effective strategies to meet current management challenges. The tasks and actions identified in the Strategy address several broad topics related to management of the sagebrush ecosystem. This science plan is organized around these topics and specifically focuses on fire, invasive plant species and their effects on altering fire regimes, restoration,...
The spread and impacts of exotic species are unambiguous, global threats to many ecosystems. A prominent example is the suite of annual grasses in the Bromus genus (Bromus hereafter) that originate from Europe and Eurasia but have invaded or are invading large areas of the Western USA. This book brings a diverse, multidisciplinary group of authors together to synthesize current knowledge, research needs, and management implications for Bromus. Exotic plant invasions are multifaceted problems, and understanding and managing them requires the biological, ecological, sociological, and economic perspectives that are integrated in this book. Knowing how well information from one geographic or environmental setting can...
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Historical disturbance regimes are often considered a critical element in maintaining native plant communities. However, the response of plant communities to disturbance may be fundamentally altered as a consequence of invasive plants, climate change, or prior disturbances. The appropriateness of historical disturbance patterns under modern conditions and the interactions among disturbances are issues that ecologists must address to protect and restore native plant communities. We evaluated the response of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh plant communities to their historical disturbance regime compared to other disturbance regimes. The historical disturbance regime of these...
This presentation aired as part of the Great Basin LCC webinar series on October 11, 2017. Speakers included Erica Fleishman, U.C. Davis, and Jimi Gragg, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.Description: As the distribution and abundance of non-native cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in the Great Basin has increased, the extent and frequency of fire in the region has increased by as much as 200%. These changes in fire regimes are associated with loss of the sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and native grasses and forbs in which many native animals, including Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), breed and feed. Managers have suggested changes in fire regimes, fuels treatments and post-fire restoration with...
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A dataset of Noxious Weed infestation inventories, treatments and monitoring activities on the San Luis Valley Public Lands in South-Central Colorado.
This presentation aired as part of the Great Basin LCC webinar series on August 28, 2017. Speakers include Matt Germino, U.S. Geological Survey and Great Basin LCC; David Pyke, U.S. Geological Survey; Richard Lee, Bureau of Land Management; Mike Gregg, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Jane Mangold, Montana State University; and Brynne Lazarus, U.S. Geological Survey.Download the presentation slides: http://bit.ly/2wHxN9CDescription: Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) invasions pose a serious threat to Great Basin ecosystems. Managers and scientists are hopeful that strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that have been selected for their weed-suppressive properties in...
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The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and non-governmental organization (NGO) partners in the southwest. This project is an ongoing effort to compile and distribute regional data on the occurrence of non-native invasive plants in the southwestern United States. The database represents the known sites (represented by a point location, i.e. site) of non-native invasive plant infestations within Arizona and New Mexico, and adjacent portions of California, Colorado, Nevada and Utah. These data, collected from 1911 to 2006, represent the field observations of various state, federal, tribal and county...
Invasive plants pose a significant threat to the integrity and biodiversity of native systems. Weed risk assessment and management provides a framework for assessing this threat. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the threat posed to biodiversity by invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate. This paper aims to estimate the impacts of climate change on exotic plant habitats, and incorporates elements of dispersal to develop a management index for identifying invasive plant threat under climate change. The spatial distribution of habitat suitability is modelled at the landscape scale for multiple exotic plant species under current climate and a climate change scenario for the year 2030. Expert...
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This layer depicts projected abundance of native and non-native plant species in the main Hawaiian Islands with high levels of uncertainty removed in post-processing. To estimate native and invasive species abundance in baseline climate conditions, a map was generated that considered abundance as percent cover and used high coefficient of variation values as a mask. The primary sources for post-processing the uncertainty masks are the Hawaiian Islands plant species abundance modeled means and standard deviation values (Wong et al., in preparation). These maps cover the entire landscape (including urban and agricultural areas), and therefore they can be applied in a variety of ways. Maps can be utilized to evaluate...
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Plant and soil data were collected in experimental plots in two sites ("Terrace" and "Hilltop") at Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, and one site ("BSV") at Badlands National Park, South Dakota. At each site, 70, 2.5 x 2.5 m plots were assigned randomly to nitrogen-alone or nitrogen+water addition treatments (or no treatment for the control). Treatments were applied and data collected 2010-2013. The dataset includes six tables: (1) experimental treatments by plot and year; (2) plant and soil metrics analyzed in the larger work; (3) plant tissue and soil total carbon and nitrogen raw data; (4) plant biomass raw data; (5) canopy and ground cover raw data; and (6) canopy and ground cover codes.
There have been relatively few tests of resource-ratio theory in terrestrial systems. Additionally, resources are known to be an important factor determining the success of invasive species. Here I discuss how the study by Newingham and Belnap (pp. 29?40, this issue) tests predictions of resource-ratio theory and how they apply it to questions of invasion by Bromus tectorum in a terrestrial grassland. Published in Plant and Soil, volume 280, issue 1-2, on pages 23 - 27, in 2006.
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This feature class contains known invasive plant species. This dataset represents the inventory mapping results of invasive plant species for the San Diego County. SANDAG's contractor, AECOM, completed an inventory mapping of invasive plant species. SANDAG will keep updating the invasive species layer when the new information is available.Â
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Six large wildfires have burned in Mesa Verde National Park during the last 15 years, and extensive portions of burns were invaded by non-native plant species. The most threatening weed species include Carduus nutans, Cirsium arvense, and Bromus tectorum, and if untreated, they persist at least 13 years. We investigated patterns of weed distribution to identify plant communities most vulnerable to post-fire weed invasion and created a spatially explicit model to predict the most vulnerable sites. At the scale of the entire park, mature pi�on?juniper woodlands growing on two soil series were most vulnerable to post-fire weed invasion; mountain shrublands were the least vulnerable. At a finer scale, greater richness...
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FY2015This effort complements a project, supported by the Joint Fire Science Program, to explore relations among cheatgrass-driven fire, climate, and sensitive-status birds across the Great Basin. With support from the NW and SW Climate Science Centers and the GB CESU, we aim to engage managers at local, state, and regional levels, and to involve both field-level and director-level personnel, during all stages of the proposed project. Our methods of engagement are intended to save managers time and decrease some of the uncertainty in planning and decision-making rather than to create additional pressures on managers time. We will conduct field visits, workshops, and interactive briefings to build trust and increase...
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FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites. Working with the USDA, USFWS and the Great Basin Institute, researchers plan to treat ten, 1-acre plots on private lands within sage-grouse Biologically Significant Areas to determine the efficacy of ACK55 in warm and dry soils.
Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh-bunchgrass communities were used to analyze the influence of disturbances on invasibility after a recovery period. These communities evolved with periodic fires shifting dominance from shrubs to herbaceous species. However, fire can facilitate Bromus tectorum L. invasion of these plant communities. We evaluated the invasibility of A. tridentata ssp. wyomingensis-bunchgrass communities 4 years after prescribed fall burning at six sites by comparing burned to unburned (control) communities. These communities did not have B. tectorum present prior to introduction. B. tectorum was introduced at 1, 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 seeds m?2 in burned and...
Bromus species – such as cheatgrass – are exotic annual grasses that have become the dominant annual grasses in the western hemisphere. Their spread and impacts across the western United States continue despite the many attempts by land managers to control these species. A new book edited by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service and Colorado State University answers critical research, planning, and management questions about these species. The book synthesizes available literature on the biology, ecology, sociology and economics of Bromus grasses to develop a more complete picture of the factors that influence their invasiveness, impacts, and management in the western United States. Lessons...
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Invasive Plant Survey Within California Coastal Watersheds from Salinas to Tijuana (currently in Draft form). This dataset is a subset including the southern portion of the study area, covering an area from the Santa Ana river watershed to the USA-Mexico border. Mapped species include giant reed, pampas grass, jubata grass, Mexican fan palm, and Canary Island date palm. More information can be found at: http://www.cal-ipc.org/ip/mapping/arundo/index.php.


map background search result map search result map Interaction of historical and nonhistorical disturbances maintains native plant communities Predicting and mitigating weed invasions to restore natural post-fire succession in Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado, USA Rogue-River Siskiyou National Forest Invasive Plants 2012 Invasive Plant Species, San Diego County Invasive plant survey for California coastal watersheds (southern section) 2015 Hawaiian Islands Plant Species Abundance Models Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Engagement of Managers and Researchers on Relations among Cheatgrass-driven Fire, Climate, and Sensitive-status Birds across the Great Basin Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007 Plant and soil data for nitrogen critical load experimental plots, Badlands and Wind Cave National Parks, South Dakota, 2010-2013 BLM REA SLV 2013 Weeds SLVPLC Poly Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Predicting and mitigating weed invasions to restore natural post-fire succession in Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado, USA Plant and soil data for nitrogen critical load experimental plots, Badlands and Wind Cave National Parks, South Dakota, 2010-2013 Interaction of historical and nonhistorical disturbances maintains native plant communities 2012 Invasive Plant Species, San Diego County Invasive plant survey for California coastal watersheds (southern section) BLM REA SLV 2013 Weeds SLVPLC Poly Rogue-River Siskiyou National Forest Invasive Plants 2015 Hawaiian Islands Plant Species Abundance Models Engagement of Managers and Researchers on Relations among Cheatgrass-driven Fire, Climate, and Sensitive-status Birds across the Great Basin Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007