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Fire is known to structure tree populations, but the role of broad-scale climate variability is less clear. For example, the influence of climatic ?teleconnections? (the relationship between oceanic?atmospheric fluctuations and anomalous weather patterns across broad scales) on forest age structure is relatively unexplored. We sampled semiarid pi�on?juniper (Pinus edulis?Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in western Colorado, USA, to test the hypothesis that woodland age structures are shaped by climate, including links to oceanic?atmospheric fluctuations, and by past fires and livestock grazing. Low-severity surface fire was lacking, as fire scars were absent, and did not influence woodland densities, but stand-replacing...
Fire is known to structure tree populations, but the role of broad-scale climate variability is less clear. For example, the influence of climatic ?teleconnections? (the relationship between oceanic?atmospheric fluctuations and anomalous weather patterns across broad scales) on forest age structure is relatively unexplored. We sampled semiarid pi�on?juniper (Pinus edulis?Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in western Colorado, USA, to test the hypothesis that woodland age structures are shaped by climate, including links to oceanic?atmospheric fluctuations, and by past fires and livestock grazing. Low-severity surface fire was lacking, as fire scars were absent, and did not influence woodland densities, but stand-replacing...
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In water-limited environments of the intermountain region of North America, summer precipitation may play a role in the structure and function of aridland communities and ecosystems. This study examined the potential reliance on summer precipitation of two widespread, coexisting woody species in the southwestern United States, Pinus edulis Englmn. (Colorado piñon) and Juniperus osteosperma (Torr) Little (Utah juniper). The current distributions of P. edulis and J. osteosperma are highly suggestive of different dependencies on summer rainfall. We hypothesized that P. edulis was dependent on summer precipitation, utilizing summer precipitation even during extremely dry summers, whereas J. osteosperma was not dependent,...
In water-limited environments of the intermountain region of North America, summer precipitation may play a role in the structure and function of aridland communities and ecosystems. This study examined the potential reliance on summer precipitation of two widespread, coexisting woody species in the southwestern United States, Pinus edulis Englmn. (Colorado pi�on) and Juniperus osteosperma (Torr) Little (Utah juniper). The current distributions of P. edulis and J. osteosperma are highly suggestive of different dependencies on summer rainfall. We hypothesized that P. edulis was dependent on summer precipitation, utilizing summer precipitation even during extremely dry summers, whereas J. osteosperma was not dependent,...
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Regional, high-resolution mapping of vegetation cover and biomass is central to understanding changes to the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, especially in the context of C management. The third most extensive vegetation type in the United States is pinyon-juniper (P-J) woodland, yet the spatial patterns of tree cover and aboveground biomass (AGB) of P-J systems are poorly quantified. We developed a synoptic remote-sensing approach to scale up pinyon and juniper projected cover (hereafter "cover") and AGB field observations from plot to regional levels using fractional photosynthetic vegetation (PV) cover derived from airborne imaging spectroscopy and Landsat satellite data. Our results demonstrated strong correlations...
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Fire is known to structure tree populations, but the role of broad-scale climate variability is less clear. For example, the influence of climatic “teleconnections” (the relationship between oceanic–atmospheric fluctuations and anomalous weather patterns across broad scales) on forest age structure is relatively unexplored. We sampled semiarid piñon–juniper (Pinus edulis–Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in western Colorado, USA, to test the hypothesis that woodland age structures are shaped by climate, including links to oceanic–atmospheric fluctuations, and by past fires and livestock grazing. Low-severity surface fire was lacking, as fire scars were absent, and did not influence woodland densities, but stand-replacing...
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In the arid southwest of North America, winter precipitation penetrates to deep soil layers, whereas summer "monsoon" precipitation generally wets only surface layers. Use of these spatially separated water sources was determined for three dominant tree species of the pinyon-juniper ecosystem at six sites along a gradient of increasing summer precipitation in Utah and Arizona. Mean summer precipitation ranged from 79 to 286 mm, or from 18% to 60% of the annual total across the gradient. We predicted that, along this summer rainfall gradient, populations of dominant tree species would exhibit a clinal off-on response for use of water from upper soil layers, responding at particular threshold levels of summer precipitation...
We compared 3 naturally ignited burns with unburned sites in the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument. Each burn site was restored with native and nonnative seed mixes, restored with native seeds only, or regen- erated naturally. In general, burned sites had significantly lower native species richness (1.8 vs. 2.9 species), native species cover (11% vs. 22.5%), and soil crust cover (4.1% vs. 15%) than unburned sites. Most burned plots, seeded or not, had significantly higher average nonnative species richness and cover and lower average native species richness and cover than unburned sites. Regression tree analyses suggest site variation was equally important to rehabilitation results as seeding treatments....
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Anthropogenic climate change is likely to alter the patterns of moisture availability globally. The consequences of these changes on species distributions and ecosystem function are largely unknown, but possibly predictable based on key ecophysiological differences among currently coexisting species. In this study, we examined the environmental and biological controls on transpiration from a piñon–juniper (Pinus edulis–Juniperus osteosperma) woodland in southern Utah, USA. The potential for climate-change-associated shifts in moisture inputs could play a critical role in influencing the relative vulnerabilities of piñons and junipers to drought and affecting management decisions regarding the persistence of this...
We analyzed and radiocarbon-dated 205 fossil woodrat middens from 14 sites in central and northern Wyoming and adjacent Utah and Montana to document spatiotemporal patterns of Holocene invasion by Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). Holocene migration into central and northern Wyoming and southern Montana from the south proceeded by a series of long-distance dispersal events, which were paced by climate variability and structured by the geographic distribution and connectivity of suitable habitats on the landscape. The migration of Utah juniper into the region involved multiple long-distance dispersal events, ranging from 30 to 135 km. One of the earliest established populations, on East Pryor Mountain in south...
These data are species distribution information assembled for assessing the impacts of land-use barriers, facilitative interactions with other species, and loss of long-distance animal dispersal on predicted species range patterns for four common species in pinyon-juniper woodlands in the western United States. The layers in the data release are initial distribution records of two kinds: point occurrence records and a raster layer for the general vegetation types where the species is a co-dominant, compiled from other sources. Both types of data are the baseline information in species distribution models for the associated publication.
Regional, high-resolution mapping of vegetation cover and biomass is central to understanding changes to the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, especially in the context of C management. The third most extensive vegetation type in the United States is pinyon?juniper (P?J) woodland, yet the spatial patterns of tree cover and aboveground biomass (AGB) of P?J systems are poorly quantified. We developed a synoptic remote-sensing approach to scale up pinyon and juniper projected cover (hereafter ?cover?) and AGB field observations from plot to regional levels using fractional photosynthetic vegetation (PV) cover derived from airborne imaging spectroscopy and Landsat satellite data. Our results demonstrated strong correlations...
In water-limited environments of the intermountain region of North America, summer precipitation may play a role in the structure and function of aridland communities and ecosystems. This study examined the potential reliance on summer precipitation of two widespread, coexisting woody species in the southwestern United States, Pinus edulis Englmn. (Colorado pi�on) and Juniperus osteosperma (Torr) Little (Utah juniper). The current distributions of P. edulis and J. osteosperma are highly suggestive of different dependencies on summer rainfall. We hypothesized that P. edulis was dependent on summer precipitation, utilizing summer precipitation even during extremely dry summers, whereas J. osteosperma was not dependent,...


    map background search result map search result map Transpiration and Hydraulic Strategies in a Pinyon-Juniper Woodland Multiscale analysis of tree cover and aboveground carbon stocks in pinyon-juniper woodlands Historical fire and multidecadal drought as context for piñon–juniper woodland restoration in western Colorado Intra- and Interspecific Variation for Summer Precipitation Use in Pinyon-Juniper Woodlands Seasonal variations in moisture use in a pinon-juniper woodland. Occurrence records and vegetation type data used for species distribution models in the western United States Transpiration and Hydraulic Strategies in a Pinyon-Juniper Woodland Seasonal variations in moisture use in a pinon-juniper woodland. Multiscale analysis of tree cover and aboveground carbon stocks in pinyon-juniper woodlands Historical fire and multidecadal drought as context for piñon–juniper woodland restoration in western Colorado Intra- and Interspecific Variation for Summer Precipitation Use in Pinyon-Juniper Woodlands Occurrence records and vegetation type data used for species distribution models in the western United States