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Wildfire can significantly alter the hydrologic response of a watershed to the extent that even modest rainstorms can produce dangerous flash floods and debris flows. The USGS conducts post-fire debris-flow hazard assessments for select fires in the Western U.S. We use geospatial data related to basin morphometry, burn severity, soil properties, and rainfall characteristics to estimate the probability and volume of debris flows that may occur in response to a design storm.
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This dataset represents 25 parallel longitudinal profiles that were extracted from terrestrial lidar point clouds taken during six survey periods. The six lidar surveys were conducted between 7 October 2010 and 8 October 2013. Over that time a colluvial hollow eroded into a fluvial channel. The longitudinal profiles show the topography of the colluvial hollow for each survey period. The width of the original colluvial hollow was approximately 1.25 m, and a longitudinal profile was extracted every 5 cm for the entire length of the hollow, resulting in 25 parallel longitudinal profiles. These data can be used to observe the transition of the colluvial hollow to a fluvial channel and furthermore they show the development...
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The West Hills of Portland, in the southern Tualatin Mountains, trend northwest along the west side of Portland, Oregon. These silt-mantled mountains receive significant wet-season precipitation and are prone to sliding during wet conditions, occasionally resulting in significant property damage or casualties. In an effort to develop a baseline for interpretive analysis of the groundwater response to rainfall, an automated monitoring system was installed in 2006 to measure rainfall, pore-water pressure, soil suction, soil-water potential, and volumetric water content at 15-minute intervals. The data show a cyclical pattern of groundwater and moisture content levels—wet from October to May and dry between June and...
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Here we present an inventory of remotely and field-observed landslides triggered by 2019-2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence. The inventory was mapped using pre- and post-event satellite imagery (PR_landslide_inventory_imagery.csv), an extensive collection of field observations (https://doi.org/10.5066/P96QNFMB) and using pre-earthquake lidar as guidance for mapping polygons with more precise locations and geometries (2015 - 2017 USGS Lidar DEM: Puerto Rico dataset). The inventory consists of a shapefile of 309 polygons (PR_landslide_inventory_pts.shp) outlining the source area and deposits together. It also includes a point inventory (PR_landslide_inventory_pts.shp) marking 170 individual displaced boulders that...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of debris flows captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Wide-angle camera) is located near Station 1 on the opposite side of the basin with a broad view of the channel. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the three cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold, derived from rainfall measurements from a rain gauge (Michel et al.,...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of floods captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Firehose Camera) is located near the bottom of the channel. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the four cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold (Michel et al., 2019). The complete videos for all the cameras are downloaded manually during site visits. More detailed information...
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A hydrologic monitoring network was installed to investigate landslide hazards affecting the railway corridor along the eastern shore of Puget Sound between Seattle and Everett, near Mukilteo, Washington. During the summer of 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey installed instrumentation at four sites to measure rainfall and air temperature every 15 minutes. Two of the four sites are installed on contrasting coastal bluffs, one landslide scarred and one vegetated. At these two sites, in addition to rainfall and air temperature, volumetric water content, pore pressure, soil suction, soil temperature (via hydrologic instrumentation), and barometric pressure were measured every 15 minutes. The instrumentation was designed...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). Three stations were set up at Chalk Cliffs which are located sequentially along a channel draining the 0.3 km2 study area. These stations are equipped with rain gauges, laser distance meters, and data loggers to record rainfall and stage data (Kean, et al., 2020). This data release includes videos of debris-flows and floods captured by high-definition cameras placed at two different locations, associated with the monitoring stations, along the study area at Chalk Cliffs during 2015. Both cameras are located near the Upper Station (Station 1). One is located at the bridge...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of debris flows captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Middle camera) is located near Station 2. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the three cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold, derived from rainfall measurements from rain gauges (Michel et al., 2019). The complete videos for all the cameras are downloaded manually...
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This data release includes 2014 time-series data from three debris-flow monitoring stations at Chalk Cliffs in Chaffee County, Colorado, USA. The data were collected to help identify the triggering conditions, magnitude, and mobility of debris flows at the site. The three stations are located sequentially along a channel draining the 0.3 km^2 study area. The Upper, Middle, and Lower stations have respective drainage areas of 0.06, 0.16, and 0.24 km^2. The location (UTM zone 13) of each station is: 396826E/4287851N (Upper), 396893E/ 4287815N (Middle), and 396929E/4287712N (Lower). See also “ChalkStationLocations.jpg” in the README.zip file. The 2014 data includes three types of time series: (1) 1-minute time series...
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This data release includes time-series data from two monitoring stations in drainage basins burned in the 2009 Station Fire, Los Angeles County, California. Both stations are located near the upper boundary of their respective watershed and were installed to study the effects of vegetation recovery on hillslope hydrology and debris-flow occurrence. The coordinates of the Arroyo Seco site are 34°14'13.10"N, 118°11'44.72"W. The coordinates for the Dunsmore Canyon hillslope site are 34°15'54.27"N, 118°14'14.41"W. The data include 1-minute time series of rainfall, soil water content, soil temperature, and soil matric potential recorded at two locations at both stations: AS1, AS2, DC1, DC2. The two locations at each...
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The USGS Geologic Hazards Science Center (GHSC) in Golden, CO maintains a GIS server with services pertaining to various geologic hazard disciplines involving earthquakes and landslides. The online link provides an overview of the structure of this server and also outlines the GIS data it contains. The folders named eq (earthquakes), haz (earthquake hazards), and ls (landlsides) contain services with data associated with each discipline.
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Following wildfire, mountainous areas of the western United States are susceptible to enhanced runoff and erosion and an increased vulnerability to debris flow during intense rainfall. Convective storms that can generate debris flows in recently burned areas may occur during or immediately after the wildfire, leaving insufficient time for development and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. We present a method for estimating post-fire debris-flow hazards prior to wildfire using historical data to define the range of potential fire severity for a given location based on the statistical distribution of severity metrics obtained from remote sensing. Estimates of debris-flow likelihood, magnitude and triggering...
This data release includes time-series, qualitative descriptions, and laboratory testing data from two monitoring stations installed in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria in 2017, which led to tens of thousands of landslides across the island (Bessette-Kirton et al., 2017). The stations were installed in July of 2018 to investigate subsurface hydrologic response to rainfall and develop a quantitative link between rainfall and landsliding. The Toro Negro site is located within the state protected Toro Negro rainforest near 18°10’N, 66°34’W and the Utuado site is located outside the city of Utuado near 18°17’N, 66°39’W. The soil found at the Toro Negro site is low-permeability, fine-grained and cohesive, and underlain...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, Colorado, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey). This "Child item" page includes videos of debris flows captured by one of the high-definition cameras at the monitoring site in Chalk Cliffs, CO. This camera (Bridge Camera) is located at Station 1 which is at the bridge cross section at the channel. The attached figure "station_and_camera_locations.png" provides an overview figure with the location of the two cameras and three stations along the channel. Video recording for all cameras is triggered using a rainfall threshold, derived from rainfall measurements from a rain gauge (Michel et al., 2019). The complete...
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Chalk Cliffs, located 8 miles southwest of Buena Vista, CO, is one of the most active debris-flow areas in the state (U.S. Geological Survey, 2020). This "Child item" page includes videos of floods captured by one of the high-definition cameras at Chalk Cliffs. This camera was placed at the Firehose Station which is located on the perimeter of the study area at the base of the cliffs and was used to monitor the impacts of cascading water runoff during rainstorms on loose sediment at the cliff base. The Firehose station was also used to constrain the sediment concentration of flows impacting sediment at the base of the cliff. It was equipped with a rain gage and video camera to record flow characteristics. See figure...
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This dataset represents thermoluminescence (TL) data that was obtained after a series of experiments to investigate how TL techniques can indicate the depth of soil heating. This project was attempted to ultimately predict changes in erosion properties in burned areas subject to debris flow hazards. The soil samples were obtained from an area burned by the Silverado wildfire (September 12 to 20, 2014). The dataset includes 3 soil samples and 1 control sample. The three burned soil samples were obtained throughout the burned watershed, and the control sample was taken in an unburned area. These will be referred to as sample 3, sample 7, sample 10, and control 1. All soil was obtained on April 23, 2015. The sample...
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This data release includes time-series data of rock temperature, air temperature, wind speed, and humidity at the Chalk Cliffs debris-flow monitoring site in central Colorado (Latitude: 38.73330, Longitude: -106.18704). The data were collected to help identify the environmental controls on rates of rockfall, which is the primary source of debris-flow material at the site. Data were recorded at 1-minute intervals between November 2011 and August 2015. Data collection was occasionally interrupted during maintenance periods or when there was a problem with the power supply. Two probes measured profiles of rock temperature at depths of 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, and 42 cm below the rock surface. One probe was placed...
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This dataset consists of over 800 field observations of ground failure (landslides, lateral spreading, and liquefaction) and other damage triggered by the 2019-2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence. The sequence started with a M4.7 earthquake on 28 December 2019, followed by many more earthquakes, including 15 larger than M5 (as of 7 July 2020). The M6.4 mainshock, which is thought to have triggered much of the observed ground failure, occurred on 7 January 2020. Most field reconnaissance efforts documented here took place as soon as possible after the mainshock, from 12-18 January 2020, to attempt to capture ephemeral data before evidence was destroyed by natural forces or repairs, but observations continued to...


map background search result map search result map Results of Hydrologic Monitoring of a Landslide-Prone Hillslope in Portland's West Hills, Oregon, 2006-2017 Results of Hydrologic Monitoring on Landslide-prone Coastal Bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington Silverado California Thermoluminescence Data Field data used to support numerical simulations of variably-saturated flow focused on variability in soil-water retention properties for the U.S. Geological Survey Bay Area Landslide Type (BALT) Site #1 in the East Bay region of California, USA Fourmile Canyon Wildfire Longitudinal Profile Data Hillslope hydrologic monitoring data following the 2009 Station Fire, Los Angeles County, California, November 2015 to June 2017 Monitoring environmental controls on debris-flow sediment supply, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, 2011 to 2015 Debris-flow monitoring data, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2014 Inventory of landslides triggered by the 2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence Field observations of ground failure triggered by the 2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence Flood Video Files for Firehose Camera, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2017 Debris-flow Video Files for Middle Camera (Station 2), Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2016 Debris Flow Video Files for Wide Angle Camera (Station 1), Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2016 Debris-flow and Flood Video Files, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2015 Debris Flow Video Files for Bridge Camera (Station 1), Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2015 Flood Video Files for Firehose Camera, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2019 Fourmile Canyon Wildfire Longitudinal Profile Data Monitoring environmental controls on debris-flow sediment supply, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, 2011 to 2015 Flood Video Files for Firehose Camera, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2017 Debris-flow Video Files for Middle Camera (Station 2), Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2016 Debris Flow Video Files for Wide Angle Camera (Station 1), Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2016 Debris-flow and Flood Video Files, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2015 Debris Flow Video Files for Bridge Camera (Station 1), Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2015 Flood Video Files for Firehose Camera, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2019 Debris-flow monitoring data, Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA, 2014 Field data used to support numerical simulations of variably-saturated flow focused on variability in soil-water retention properties for the U.S. Geological Survey Bay Area Landslide Type (BALT) Site #1 in the East Bay region of California, USA Hillslope hydrologic monitoring data following the 2009 Station Fire, Los Angeles County, California, November 2015 to June 2017 Results of Hydrologic Monitoring on Landslide-prone Coastal Bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington Inventory of landslides triggered by the 2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence Silverado California Thermoluminescence Data Field observations of ground failure triggered by the 2020 Puerto Rico earthquake sequence