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Speaker: Dr. Jason Kreitler, USGSWednesday, October 24, 2012 -12:00pm to 1:00pmThis project is analyzing downscaled climate model data to assess the geography of climate change at scales relevant to actual conservation actions. This work analyzes the California Essential Habitat Connectivity products to determine which protected lands are most vulnerable and which of the proposed corridors would partially mitigate climate change threats.
Kristin Byrd presented how this project aids conservation of California rangelands by identifying future integrated threats of climate change and land use change, and will quantify two main co-benefits of rangeland conservation – water supply and carbon sequestration. Through a multi-stakeholder partnership, the project proponents will develop integrated climate change/land use change scenarios for the Central Valley and Chaparral and Oak Woodland eco-regions, and disseminate information about future potential threats to high priority conservation areas within the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (CRCC) study area, which includes the foothills around the Central Valley and most of the southern Inner Coast...
Adaptation Planning Workshop #1:We convened a two-day workshop with scientists, managers, conservation practitioners, and others to use the findings of the vulnerability assessment to inform the development of climate-smart adaptation strategies and actions to conserve priority habitats. Specifically, we used the results of the vulnerability assessment to evaluate whether existing management actions may be vulnerable to climate change, and identify opportunities to modify existing actions to reduce vulnerabilities and become more climate-smart. We then focused on identifying climate-smart conservation strategies and actions that are not currently being implemented, but should be considered in order to conserve priority...
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Rainwater Harvesting and Stormwater Research is a priority research area identified by the Arizona Governor’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Water Sustainability, which recommended that universities take the lead to identify regulatory barriers, cost and benefits, water quality issues and avenues for increasing utilization of stormwater and rainwater at the regional, community and individual property level. In an effort to address the priority research area, the University of Arizona will develop a decision support tool to be used by public utilities and agencies to evaluate suitability and cost-effectiveness of rainwater and stormwater capture at various scales for multiple benefits. Data from the City of Tucson, Arizona...
Native Nations face unique challenges related to climate change, many of which are detailed in recent reports as part of the U.S. National Climate Assessment (Bennett et al. 2014; Hiza Redsteer et al. 2013). Native Americans have a deep connection to the natural environment within which their livelihoods, cultural identity, and spiritual practices are rooted. Changes to hydrologic regimes, landscapes, and ecosystems, in combination with socio-economic and political factors, amplify tribal vulnerabilities to climate change. In the Southwest, tribes are already experiencing a range of impacts that are at least partially related to climate change. They include serious water supply and water quality issues in the...
On August 25, 2015 speaker Matt Germino presented on his work restoring sagebrush in the Great Basin. Shrubs are ecosystem foundation species in most of the Great Basin’s landscapes. Most of the species, including sagebrush, are poorly adapted to the changes in fire and invasive pressures that are compounded by climate change. This presentation gives an overview of challenges and opportunities regarding restoration of sagebrush and blackbrush, focusing on climate adaptation, selection of seeds and achieving seeding and planting success. Results from Great Basin LCC supported research on seed selection and planting techniques are presented.
Vernal or seasonal pools are small, temporary bodies of water that can serve as critical habitat for frogs, salamanders, reptiles, invertebrates, and other species. The first step in developing effective conservation strategies for vernal pools and associated wildlife species is to know where on the landscape these small wetlands exist. Although several several states and organizations in the Northeast region have initiated coordinated vernal pool mapping projects, this information has never been assembled in one place.Currently, the Vernal Pool Data Cooperative (VPDC) consists of over 60,000 vernal pool locations submitted by cooperators representing ten states and two Canadian provinces from Virginia to Quebec’s...
The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the north-central U.S. and south-central Canada contains millions of small prairie wetlands that provide critical habitat to many migrating and breeding waterbirds. Due to their small size and the relatively dry climate of the region, these wetlands are considered at high risk for negative climate change effects as temperatures increase. To estimate the potential impacts of climate change on breeding waterbirds, we predicted current and future distributions of species common in the PPR using species distribution models (SDMs). We created regional-scale SDMs for the U.S. PPR using Breeding Bird Survey occurrence records for 1971–2011 and wetland, upland, and climate variables....
The challenge of managing for invasive species creates an opportunity for the GNLCC to provide leadership on landscape scale stressors where there is a need for coordination of planning and on the ground activities. Currently, to the best of our knowledge, the north-western part of the North American continent remains free of quagga and zebra mussels. Infestation of aquatic systems in the GNLCC by quagga and zebra mussels would be economically, socially and environmentally devastating. An infestation in one of the jurisdictions within the mussel-free northwest would likely lead to domino effect. It is therefore critical that managers recognize the interconnectedness of the ecosystems comprising the GNLCC and take...
Presentation given at the 2014 North American Congress on Conservation Biology July 13-16, 2014 in Missoula Montana Abstract: The Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE) is considered an ecologically intact ecosystem and one of the most diverse in North America, but like many natural areas, habitat fragmentation represents one of the area’s most pressing concerns. Species perceive and move through landscapes in different ways; understanding how these differences impact connectivity is vital to conservation efforts. Using resistant kernel connectivity modelling, this study explores connectivity in the CCE using a suite of hypothetical species to understand the synoptic patterns of connectivity in the CCE for multiple...
This presentation aired as part of the Great Basin LCC webinar series on December 6, 2017. The presentation was given by Dr. Tamara Wall of the Desert Research InstituteOne of the challenges facing public land managers in the Great Basin is identifying adaptation strategies to increase resiliency to climate change in an area that is already struggling with profound environmental challenges. Recent efforts to understand how the Great Basin weathered past droughts and climate variability may offer insight into approaches that could work in future decades. One approach to gather this information is to understand Traditional Knowledge. Gathering this information is challenging and requires an acknowledgment that much...
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The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska is a globally important region for numerous avian species including millions of migrating and nesting waterbirds. Climate change effects such as sea level rise and increased storm frequency and intensity have the potential to impact waterbird populations and breeding habitat. In order to determine the potential impacts of these climate-mediated changes, we investigated both short-term and long-term impacts of storm surges to geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.To do this, we used 29 years of ground-based surveys conducted as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s long-term waterbird monitoring program along with flood indices modeled...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: SALTWATER INTRUSION, SEDIMENT TRANSPORT, SEA LEVEL RISE, presentation, SEDIMENTATION, All tags...
The western coastline of Alaska spans over 10,000 km of diverse topography ranging from low lying tundra in the north to sharp volcanic relief in the south. Included in this range are areas highly susceptible to powerful storms which can cause coastal flooding, erosion and have many other negative effects on the environment and commercial efforts in the region. In order to better understand the multi-scale and interactive physics of the deep ocean,continental shelf, near shore, and coast, a large unstructured domain hydrodynamic model is being developed using the finite element, free surface circulation code ADCIRC.This model is a high resolution, accurate, and robust computational model of Alaska’s coastal environment...
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FY2014One of the primary challenges facing public land managers in the Great Basin is identifying adaptation strategies to increase resiliency to climate change in an area that is already struggling with profound environmental challenges. Recent efforts to understand how the Great Basin weathered past droughts and climate variability may offer insight into approaches that could work in future decades. One approach to gather this information is to understand Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK). Gathering this information is challenging and requires an acknowledgment that much of this information is highly sensitive and proprietary. Translating this information into actionable management plans is even more challenging.This...
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FY2014This projects main goals are to assess the effects of grazing by feral horses and livestock on Greater Sage-grouse demography and habitats. The Sheldon-Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex and adjacent lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management provide the unique opportunity to assess sage-grouse populations free of feral horses and livestock grazing, populations that only have feral horses, as well as populations that coincide with both livestock grazing and feral horses. The project team will:1)Use historical sage-grouse data collected from Hart Mountain before and immediately after livestock were removed in the early 1990s, and historical data from Sheldon before the irruption of feral horses...
Speaker: Dr. Keirith Snyder, USDA ARS, Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit, Reno, NV The opportunistic encroachment of native pinyon and juniper trees into areas formerly dominated by sagebrush has reduced the presence of shrubs and grasses, impacting critical habitat and forage availability. Pinyon and juniper currently occupy 19 million hectares in the Intermountain West. Prior to 1860, it is estimated that 2/3 of pinyon and juniper woodlands were sagebrush communities. This presentation will give an overview of the Porter Canyon Experimental Watershed, where tree-felling treatments are being studied. Porter Canyon is located in central Nevada in the Desatoya Mountains. A network of sensors has been installed...
This presentation aired as part of the Great Basin LCC webinar series on October 11, 2017. Speakers included Erica Fleishman, U.C. Davis, and Jimi Gragg, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.Description: As the distribution and abundance of non-native cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in the Great Basin has increased, the extent and frequency of fire in the region has increased by as much as 200%. These changes in fire regimes are associated with loss of the sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and native grasses and forbs in which many native animals, including Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), breed and feed. Managers have suggested changes in fire regimes, fuels treatments and post-fire restoration with...
The papers in this special issue feature state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physical processes related to sediment transport and geomorphology of complex coastal–estuarine systems. Here we focus on the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, extending from the lower San Joaquin–Sacramento Delta, through the Bay, and along the adjacent outer Pacific Coast. San Francisco Bay is an urbanized estuary that is impacted by numerous anthropogenic activities common to many large estuaries, including a mining legacy, channel dredging, aggregate mining, reservoirs, freshwater diversion, watershed modifications, urban run-off, ship traffic, exotic species introductions, land reclamation, and wetland restoration. The...


map background search result map search result map Utility Guide to Rainwater/Stormwater Harvesting as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS) Presentations - 2017 Using Narrative Stories to Understand Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Great Basin Webinar 2016: Networked Monitoring of Salmon Habitat Temperature: Two Case Studies from Southwestern Alaska Webinar (2015 Oct 14) Assessment of Impacts of Feral Horses and Livestock Grazing on Sage-grouse and their Habitats: Long-term trends in sage-grouse demography and habitats on the Sheldon-Hart Mountain NWRC and adjacent lands Assessment of Impacts of Feral Horses and Livestock Grazing on Sage-grouse and their Habitats: Long-term trends in sage-grouse demography and habitats on the Sheldon-Hart Mountain NWRC and adjacent lands Webinar (2015 Oct 14) Webinar 2016: Networked Monitoring of Salmon Habitat Temperature: Two Case Studies from Southwestern Alaska Using Narrative Stories to Understand Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Great Basin Utility Guide to Rainwater/Stormwater Harvesting as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change Southeast Conservation Adaptation Strategy (SECAS) Presentations - 2017