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Description of WorkThe Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was established to accelerate ecosystem restoration in the Great Lakes by confronting the most serious threats to the region, such as nonpoint source pollution, toxic sediments, and invasive species. Four Priority Watersheds have been targeted by the Regional Working Group's Phosphorus Reduction Work Group (Fox/Green Bay, Saginaw, Maumee, and Genesee) and are characterized by having a high density of agricultural land use and have ecosystem impairments that have been clearly identified. Monitoring is being conducted at the sub-watershed, edge-of-field, and subsurface-tile scale where monitoring locations are targeted to those areas within each watershed...
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Description of Work U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are focusing on restoring natural water flow and ecological processes between coastal wetlands in the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (Ohio) and adjacent to Lake Erie to improve fish and wildlife habitat. This pilot project will develop approaches that will restore coastal wetland function and increase ecosystem resilience to be used as a model throughout the Great Lakes basin. USGS will focus on restoring natural hydrologic processes in diked coastal wetlands adjacent to Great Lakes waters to improve wetland functions like phosphorus retention and restoration of habitats for fish and wildlife. Sustainable approaches are being developed in the Maumee River...
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Description of Work The invasive form of Phragmites australis (common reed) is a well-established pest in many parts of the Great Lakes and the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts, including designated Areas of Concern. New innovative control options that sustainably target the competitive advantage often enjoyed by Phragmites and other invasive plants will contribute to a broad Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategy. This project targets the microorganisms that may help Phragmites spread and will employ a molecular genetic approach to silence the genes in Phragmites that give it a competitive edge over many native plants. This project helped build and will continue to be closely aligned with the Great Lakes Phragmites...
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Description of Work U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provided a one-week training course for ''Geomorphic Analysis of Fluvial Systems'' to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other state and local agencies in Chicago. This provided an introduction to the concepts of how stream channels change over time due to natural and human-caused changes in the watershed. This training assisted managers in understanding the goals and limits of stream restoration specific to Great Lakes streams. Much of the training centered on sediment movement in channels and also was applicable to EPA managers working on clean-sediment TMDLs and nutrient-sediment interactions.
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Description of Work The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was established to accelerate ecosystem restoration in the Great Lakes by confronting the most serious threats to the region, such as nonpoint source pollution, toxic sediments, and invasive species. Three Priority Watersheds have been targeted by the Regional Working Group's Phosphorus Reduction Work Group (Fox/Green Bay, Saginaw, and Maumee) and are characterized by having a high density of agricultural land use and have ecosystem impairments that have been clearly identified. Within the Fox River Priority Watershed, monitoring is being conducted at the sub-watershed and edge-of-field scale. The edge-of-field stations are targeted to those areas...
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Description of Work U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will use remote sensing data to establish a baseline understanding of current distributions of invasive wetland plants and then forecast potential invasion corridors. Alterations to the Great Lakes shoreline or water-level patterns associated with global climate change could have significant impacts on the extent and composition of coastal habitat. Low lake levels can expose fertile wetland bottomlands to invasive species such as common reed ( Phragmites). Goals & Objectives Goals: Identify current Phragmites distribution in the Great Lakes coastal zone, detect potential areas vulnerable to invasion due to influences such as altered water levels, nutrient and...
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Description of Work This project is designed to (1) collect more frequent total suspended sediment (TSS) and total phosphorous (TP) data for the Genesee River Watershed, especially sub-watersheds at the 12-digit HUC (Hydrologic Unit code) scale, both within and outside of the AOC; and (2) to conduct a pilot study capable of evaluating the reduction in sediments and nutrients from the current and proposed GLRI non-point source reduction projects in the watershed aggregated at the 12-digit HUC. This project is envisioned as a two-year pilot for the Genesee River Watershed, with potentially wider applications in the Lake Ontario Basin and other Great Lake areas.


    map background search result map search result map Building local capacity to address nonpoint source problems Evaluation of Phosphorus Reduction - Fox River Forecasting Potential Phragmites Coastal Invasion Corridors New Strategies for Restoring Coastal Wetland Function, Maumee River Area of Concern Invasive Phragmites: Prevention, Monitoring, and Control Strategies in an Integrated Pest Management Framework Genesee River BUI / Genesee River Watershed: TSS and TP loading collection and Pilot Project to Evaluate Aggregate BMP Effectiveness New Strategies for Restoring Coastal Wetland Function, Maumee River Area of Concern Evaluation of Phosphorus Reduction - Fox River Genesee River BUI / Genesee River Watershed: TSS and TP loading collection and Pilot Project to Evaluate Aggregate BMP Effectiveness Forecasting Potential Phragmites Coastal Invasion Corridors Invasive Phragmites: Prevention, Monitoring, and Control Strategies in an Integrated Pest Management Framework Building local capacity to address nonpoint source problems