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The percentage difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on April 1 for the reference (1989-2011) climate period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on April 1 for the T4 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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Mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on February 20, the date of peak basin-integrated mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) for the T4 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
In this study we identify the physiographic and snowpack conditions currently represented by snowpack telemetry (SNOTEL) stations in the Rio Grande headwaters. Based on 8 years of advanced very high-resolution radiometer data (1995–2002) a snow cover persistence index was derived. Snow cover persistence values at the seven SNOTEL sites ranged from 3·9 to 4·75, with an average 14% greater than the mean persistence of the watershed. Using elevation, western barrier distance, and vegetation density, a 32-node binary classification tree model explained 75% of the variability in average snow cover persistence. Terrain classes encompassing the Lily Pond, Middle Creek, and Slumgullion SNOTEL sites represented 4·1%,...
Inverse weighted distance and regression nonexact techniques were evaluated for interpolating methods snow water equivalent (SWE) across the entire Colorado River Basin of the western United States. A 1-km spacing was used for the gridding of snow telemetry (SNOTEL) measurements for the years 1993, 1998, and 1999, which on average, represented higher than average, average, and lower than average snow years. Because of the terrain effects, the regression techniques (hypsometric elevation and multivariate physiographic parameter) were found to be superior to the weighted distance approaches (inverse distance weighting squared, and optimal power inverse distance weighting). A regression detrended inverse weighted distance...
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This dataset includes Snow Free Date(sfdy) for northern Alaska in GeoTiff format, covering the years 1980-2012. Snow Free Date is defined as day of the end of the core snow period(day of year). The core snow season is defined to be the longest period of continuous snow cover in each year. The dataset was generated by the Arctic LCC SNOWDATA: Snow Datasets for Arctic Terrestrial Applications project.“Day-of-year” (doy) output is expressed in Ordinal dates (“1” on 1 January, and “365” on 31 December). Dates have not been corrected for leap years. This output is appropriate for display purposes, as it is readily interpreted as calendar day of year. It is not recommended as input for analysis, as it may produce incorrect...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: AIR TEMPERATURE, AIR TEMPERATURE, ALBEDO, ALBEDO, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
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This dataset includes Snow Depth(snod) for northern Alaska in GeoTiff format, covering the years 1980-2012. Snow Depth is defined as depth on 1 March(m). The dataset was generated by the Arctic LCC SNOWDATA: Snow Datasets for Arctic Terrestrial Applications project.The dataset is delivered in the ZIP archive file format. Each year is output in a separate GeoTiff file, where the year is indicated by the filename.Over the last 20 years, under a variety of NOAA, NSF, and NASA research programs, a snow-evolution modeling system has been developed that includes the MicroMet micrometeorological model, the SnowModel snow-process model, and the SnowAssim data assimilation model. These modeling tools can be thought of as...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: AIR TEMPERATURE, AIR TEMPERATURE, ALBEDO, ALBEDO, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
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The Database was built to enable data integration across sources, as well as to support program planning and observational network design. The Imiq Data Portal provides a snapshot of available hydroclimate data – a map-based view of where , what , and when data have been obtained. Users can submit a custom data query, specifying variable of interest, geographic bounds, and time step. Imiq will aggregate and export data records from multiple sources in a common format, with full metadata records that provide information about the source data.
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: ABLATION, ABLATION, ACTIVE LAYER, ACTIVE LAYER, ALBEDO, All tags...
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Mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on March 13, the date of peak basin-integrated mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) for the T2 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T2 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +2oC to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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The percentage difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on April 1 for the reference (1989-2011) climate period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on April 1 for the T2 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T2 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +2°C to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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Project Summary Climate change is projected to have substantial impacts on Pacific Northwest water resources and ecosystems. Recognizing this, resource managers have expressed growing interest in incorporating climate change information into long-range planning. The availability of hydrologic scenarios to support climate change adaptation and long-range planning, however, has been limited until very recently to a relatively small number of selected case studies. More comprehensive resources needed to support regional planning have been lacking. Furthermore, ecosystem studies at the landscape scale need consistent climate change information and databases over large geographic areas. Products using a common set of...
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The absolute difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on March 28 for the reference period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on February 20 for the T4P10 climate change scenario, which are the dates of peak basin-integrated SWE for each period, respectively.Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4P10 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record, and +10% precipitation to each daily precipitation record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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The Imiq Hydroclimate Database houses hydrologic, climatologic, and soils data collected in Alaska and Western Canada from the early 1900s to the present. This database unifies and preserves numerous data collections that have, until now, been stored in field notebooks, on desktop computers, as well as in disparate databases. Synthesizing and analyzing the large-scale hydroclimate characteristics of this important climatic region have been made easier with this searchable database. The data, originally collected in a Microsoft SQL Server 2008 relational database, has been migrated to an open source PostgreSQL and PostGIS environment. The Imiq Data Portal provides public access to portions of the Imiq Hydroclimate...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: ABLATION, ABLATION, ACTIVE LAYER, ACTIVE LAYER, ALBEDO, All tags...
Abstract (from http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/11/8/084009/meta): Record low snowpack conditions were observed at Snow Telemetry stations in the Cascades Mountains, USA during the winters of 2014 and 2015. We tested the hypothesis that these winters are analogs for the temperature sensitivity of Cascades snowpacks. In the Oregon Cascades, the 2014 and 2015 winter air temperature anomalies were approximately +2 °C and +4 °C above the climatological mean. We used a spatially distributed snowpack energy balance model to simulate the sensitivity of multiple snowpack metrics to a +2 °C and +4 °C warming and compared our modeled sensitivities to observed values during 2014 and 2015. We found that for...
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The absolute difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on April 1 for the reference (1989-2011) climate period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on April 1 for the T4P10 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4P10 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record, and +10% precipitation to each daily precipitation record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) is an international program to produce high resolution climate change simulations in order to investigate uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and generate climate change scenarios for use in impacts research. NARCCAP modelers are running a set of regional climate models (RCMs) driven by a set of atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) over a domain covering the conterminous United States and most of Canada. The AOGCMs have been forced with the SRES A2 emissions scenario for the 21st century. Simulations with these models were also produced for the current (historical) period. The RCMs are nested within...
Early succession aspen and late succession conifer forests have different architecture and physiology affecting hydrologic transfer processes. An evaluation of water pools and fluxes was used to determine differences in the hydrologic dynamics between stands of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and associated stands of mixed conifer consisting of white fir (Abies concolor), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii). In 2005 and 2006, measurements of snow water accumulation, snow ablation (melt), soil water content, snowpack sublimation, and evapotranspiration (ET) were measured in adjacent aspen and conifer stands. Peak snow water equivalent (SWE) averaged 34–44% higher in...
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This dataset includes Snow Up Date(sudt) for northern Alaska in GeoTiff format, covering the years 1980-2012. Snow Up Date is defined as day of the start of the core snow period(day of simulation). The core snow season is defined to be the longest period of continuous snow cover in each year. The dataset was generated by the Arctic LCC SNOWDATA: Snow Datasets for Arctic Terrestrial Applications project.The simulation period runs from 1 September – 31 August. “Day-of-simulation” takes the value of “1” on 1 September, “123” on 1 January, and “365” on 31 August. “Day-of-simulation” files should be used for analysis (trend, mean, etc.).The dataset is delivered in the ZIP archive file format. Each year is output in a...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: AIR TEMPERATURE, AIR TEMPERATURE, ALBEDO, ALBEDO, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
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The absolute difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on March 28 for the reference period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on March 13 for the T2P10 climate change scenario, which are the dates of peak basin-integrated SWE for each period, respectively. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T2P10 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +2°C to each daily temperature record, and +10% precipitation to each daily precipitation record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.


map background search result map search result map North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) Hydrologic Climate Change Scenarios for the Pacific Northwest Columbia River Basin and Coastal Drainages Modeled snow-water-equivalent, absolute difference in historical and projected April 1 values under T4P10 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T2 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, absolute difference in historical and projected seasonal peak values under T2P10 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, absolute difference in historical and projected seasonal peak values under T4P10 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T2 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Imiq - Hydroclimate Database and Data Portal SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Free Date (year) SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Depth SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Up Date Imiq Data Portal Modeled snow-water-equivalent, absolute difference in historical and projected April 1 values under T4P10 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T2 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, absolute difference in historical and projected seasonal peak values under T2P10 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, absolute difference in historical and projected seasonal peak values under T4P10 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T2 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Hydrologic Climate Change Scenarios for the Pacific Northwest Columbia River Basin and Coastal Drainages SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Free Date (year) SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Depth SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Up Date Imiq - Hydroclimate Database and Data Portal Imiq Data Portal North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP)