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This dataset consists of short-term (~32 years) shoreline change rates for the north coast of Alaska between the U.S. Canadian Border and the Hulahula River. Rate calculations were computed within a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3, an ArcGIS extension developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Short-term rates of shoreline change were calculated using a linear regression rate-of-change method based on available shoreline data between 1978 and 2010. A reference baseline was used as the originating point for the orthogonal transects cast by the DSAS software. The transects intersect each shoreline establishing measurement points, which are then used to calculate short-term rates.
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This dataset consists of short-term (~31 years) shoreline change rates for the north coast of Alaska between the Point Barrow and Icy Cape. Rate calculations were computed within a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3, an ArcGIS extension developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Short-term rates of shoreline change were calculated using a linear regression rate-of-change method based on available shoreline data between 1979 and 2010. A reference baseline was used as the originating point for the orthogonal transects cast by the DSAS software. The transects intersect each shoreline establishing measurement points, which are then used to calculate short-term rates.
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The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected in 2010 and 2017-2018. Previously published historical shorelines for South Carolina (Kratzmann and others, 2017)...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Bald Point State Park, CMGP, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, DSAS, Digital Shoreline Analysis System, All tags...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management compiled Massachusetts vector shorelines into an updated dataset for the Office’s Shoreline Change Project. The Shoreline Change Project started in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the Massachusetts coast by compiling a database of historical shoreline positions. Trends of shoreline position over long- and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future changes to costal resources and infrastructure. This updated dataset strengthens the understanding of shoreline position change in Massachusetts. It includes U.S. Geological Survey vector shorelines...
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Understanding how sea-level rise will affect coastal landforms and the species and habitats they support is critical for developing approaches that balance the needs of humans and native species. Given the magnitude of the threat posed by sea-level rise, and the urgency to better understand it, there is an increasing need to forecast sea-level rise effects on barrier islands. To address this problem, scientists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology program are developing Bayesian networks as a tool to evaluate and to forecast the effects of sea-level rise on shoreline change, barrier island geomorphology, and habitat availability for species such as the piping plover (Charadrius melodus)...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Assateague Island, Assateague Island, Assateague Island National Seashore, Assateague Island National Seashore, Atlantic Ocean, All tags...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast and support local land-use decisions. Trends of shoreline position over long and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future impacts to coastal resources and infrastructure. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013 two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from NOAA's Ocean Service, Coastal...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast and support local land-use decisions. Trends of shoreline position over long and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future impacts to coastal resources and infrastructure. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013 two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from NOAA's Ocean Service, Coastal...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast by compiling a database of historical (mid 1800's-1989) shoreline positions. Trends of shoreline position over long and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future impacts to coastal resources and infrastructure. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast and support local land-use decisions. Trends of shoreline position over long and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future impacts to coastal resources and infrastructure. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013 two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from NOAA's Ocean Service, Coastal...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates at 40-meter intervals along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013 two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from NOAA's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 update includes two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines for the Massachusetts...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes one new mean high water (MHW) shoreline extracted from lidar data collected in 2017 for the entire coastal region of North Carolina which is divided into four subregions: northern North Carolina...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes one new mean high water (MHW) shoreline extracted from lidar data collected in 2017 for the entire coastal region of North Carolina which is divided into four subregions: northern North Carolina...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...


map background search result map search result map Wave Height Data for the Gulf of Mexico Shorelines of the Florida north (FLnorth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Sheltered East Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska between the U.S. Canadian Border and the Hulahula River Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Exposed East Chukchi Sea coast of Alaska between the Point Barrow and Icy Cape Intersects for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for the Buzzards Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for the South Shore of MA Historical shoreline positions for the coast of MA, from 1844 - 2014 Intersects for the coastal region around Boston, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Baselines for Outer Cape Cod, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Seabeach Amaranth Presence-Absence Data, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2010 A GIS compilation of vector shorelines for the Virginia coastal region from the 1840s to 2010s Long-term shoreline change rates for the Virginia coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Virginia generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Long-term shoreline change rate transects for the South Carolina coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Baseline for the North Carolina coastal region from Cape Hatteras to Cape Lookout (NCcentral) Long and short-term shoreline change rate transects for the northern North Carolina coastal region (NCnorth), calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for the coastal region around Boston, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for the Buzzards Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for coastal region of Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for the South Shore of MA Long and short-term shoreline change rate transects for the northern North Carolina coastal region (NCnorth), calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Baseline for the North Carolina coastal region from Cape Hatteras to Cape Lookout (NCcentral) Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Exposed East Chukchi Sea coast of Alaska between the Point Barrow and Icy Cape Intersects for coastal region of Virginia generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Virginia coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 A GIS compilation of vector shorelines for the Virginia coastal region from the 1840s to 2010s Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Sheltered East Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska between the U.S. Canadian Border and the Hulahula River Historical shoreline positions for the coast of MA, from 1844 - 2014 Shorelines of the Florida north (FLnorth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Long-term shoreline change rate transects for the South Carolina coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Wave Height Data for the Gulf of Mexico