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These data were compiled from field drift collections and from a meta-analysis of published drift literature. Field data were collected in 2014 from the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, from the Salt River downstream of Stewart Mountain Dam, Arizona, and from Wet Beaver Creek near the Village of Oak Creek, Arizona. These data represent flow meter measurements taken at the mouth and adjacent to a drift net, and suspended solids concentrations collected by the drift net, over varying net deployment durations.
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This map shows the impacts of human activity on stream ecology. Layers include: Chinook salmon habitat and future roads in the CYR study area; Chum salmon habitat and future roads in the CYR study area; Inconnu habitat and future roads in the CYR study area; Dolly Varden habitat and future roads in the CYR study area; Chinook salmon habitat and mineral potential in the CYR study area; Chum salmon habitat and mineral potential in the CYR study area; Inconnu habitat and mineral potential in the CYR study area; Dolly Varden habitat and mineral potential in the CYR study area. These data are provided by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) "as is" and may contain errors or omissions. The User assumes the entire risk associated...
Billions of dollars are being spent in the United States to restore rivers to a desired, yet often unknown, reference condition. In lieu of a known reference, practitioners typically assume the paradigm of a connected watercourse. Geological and ecological processes, however, create patchy and discontinuous fluvial systems. One of these processes, dam building by North American beavers (Castor canadensis), generated discontinuities throughout precolonial river systems of northern North America. Under modern conditions, beaver dams create dynamic sequences of ponds and wet meadows among free-flowing segments. One beaver impoundment alone can exceed 1000 meters along the river, flood the valley laterally, and fundamentally...
In this paper, we synthesize a series of small dam removal studies to examine how changes in channel form can affect riparian vegetation, fish, macroinvertebrates, mussels, and nutrient dynamics. Each of the ecosystem attributes responded to the disturbance of dam removal in different ways and recovered at very different rates, ranging from months to decades. Riparian vegetation appeared to require the greatest time for recovery, while macroinvertebrates had the least. Mussel communities were the most adversely affected group of species and showed no signs of recovery during the time period of the study. Based on these and other studies, we suggest that ecosystems may follow two trajectories of recovery following...


    map background search result map search result map Stream Drift Sampling in Arizona, 2014—Data BLM REA CYR 2013 Impacts of Human Activity on Stream Ecology BLM REA CYR 2013 Impacts of Human Activity on Stream Ecology