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Abstract has not been submitted
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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Various aspects of the breeding biology of Laughing Gulls (Larus atricilla) have been studied extensively in Florida (Dinsmore and Schreiber 1974, Schreiber et al. 1979, Schreiber and Schreiber 1980), New Jersey (Bongiorno 1970, Burger and Beer 1976, Burger 1976, Montevecchi 1978), and Massachusetts (Noble and Wurm 1943), but little is known of their yearly fledging success in Texas or elsewhere. The Laughing Gull is a common colonial nester along most of the Texas coast, second only to the Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) in breeding abundance; however, the Laughing Gull may be threatened in Texas because of suspected declines at certain traditional nesting locales (Blacklock et al. 1979). Since Laughing Gulls often...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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This study was conducted to determine landscape and fine-scale vegetative variables associated with breeding Loggerhead Shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus) on Fort Riley Military Reservation, Kansas. Because Fort Riley is an Army training site, the influences of training disturbance to the vegetation, and range management practices on bird habitat patterns were also investigated. Breeding birds were surveyed in 1995 and 1996 using point counts. Survey plots were identified, a priori, at the landscape scale as either grassland, savannah, or woodland edge according to cover by woody vegetation. In 1996, fine-scale habitat at survey points and at bird use sites was measured and a principal components analysis used to characterize...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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A total of 36 roost sites of the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) were studied in southern Florida, of which four (11%) were used regularly for 6 or more years. Major roosts were also used as nesting sites. All roosts were in flooded marshes and 33 (91.6%) were in stands of coastal-plain willow. Population increase and the number of roosts were strongly correlated. The number of kites arriving at roosts before sunset was smaller than arriving after sunset (37.8:62.2%), and gray birds (adult and subadult males) generally went to roost earlier than brown birds (all females and immature males). Rites tended to go to roost earlier on cloudy days. Morning departure from roosts was over a much shorter time than arrivals...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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The population status of the Everglade Kite (Rostrhamus sociabils plumbeus) was studied in Florida from 1968 through 1978. Sixty-four nestlings (40% of known fledged young) were leg-banded with unique color combinations, and of these, 17.2% were seen 1 or more years after they were banded. Kites were capable of breeding at 3 years of age or possibly younger. The population was nomadic; its sex ratio unknown. From 1968 through 1976 breeding success was determined for 175 nests, of which 48% were successful: 161 young were fledged, x = 20.1 per year, or 1.9 per successful nest (N = 84). The percentage of successful nests ranged from 17.1 (N = 35) in 1974 to 84.6 (N = 13) in 1968 (x= 54.1 per year). From 1968 through...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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Abstract has not been submitted
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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We studied orientation of nest sites relative to nearby vegetation for dabbling ducks (Cinnamon Teal, Anas cyanoptera; Blue-winged Teal, A. discors; Gadwall, A. strepera; Mallard, A. platyrhynchos; and Northern Shoveler, A. clypeata) and Short-eared Owls (Asio flammeus) in ungrazed grassland habitat during 1995-1997 in westcentral Montana. We estimated an index of vegetation height and density in intercardinal directions (NE, SE, SW, NW) immediately around nests. All species oriented nests with the least vegetation to the southeast and the most vegetation to either the southwest or northwest. Furthermore, maximum vegetation around nests shifted from the southwest to the northwest with increasing nest initiation...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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No abstract available.Review info: Handbook of the Birds of the World, Volume 8, Broadbills to Tapaculos. Edited by Josep del Hoyo, Andrew Elliott, and David Christie. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain. 2003: 845 pp., 81 color plates, over 470 color photographs, 672 maps. ISBN: 8487334504, $195.00 (cloth)
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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The population status, reproductive success, and levels of environmental contaminants in brown pelicans (P. occidentalis) in Texas were studied from 1975 through 1981. Breeding populations increased from 18 pairs in 1975 to 57 pairs in 1981. All unhatched eggs salvaged for analyses of contaminant residues contained DDT metabolites. Mean DDE levels varied from 0.9 to 2.4 ppm and about 7% of the samples had residues that approached critical levels that could affect reproductive success. DDE levels did not decline from 1975 to 1981 and residues leveled off at higher values than those in South Carolina and Louisiana pelican populations. PCB [polychlorinated biphenyl] residues also remained stable. Endrin was detected...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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Abstract has not been submitted
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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Status and population trends of Hawaiis ’ native waterbirds were examined from 1977 through 1987. Waterbird population fluctuations were analyzed in relation to rainfall and land use dynamics. Numbers of Hawaiian Duck (Koloa) (Anus wyvilliana) and Hawaiian Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus sandvicensis) appeared stable over time; however, surveys were limited. Increase in Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorux nycticorux) abundance appeared linked to expansion of aquaculture, particularly on Oahu, and not to climatic events. Annual rainfall patterns help explain and predict population fluctuations and anomalous distribution patterns involving Hawaiian American Coots (Fulica americana alai), moorhens, and Hawaiian...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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Methods for identifying the sex and age of the Akiapolaau (Hemignathus munroi), an endangered honeycreeper found only on the island of Hawaii, were developed by examination and measurement of 73 museum specimens and 24 live birds captured in mist nests. Akiapolaau probably undergo a single annual molt, with most birds molting between February and July. The mottled juvenal plumage is replaced by a first basic plumage characterized by yellowish-gray or yellowish-green underparts and often by retained wingbars. Male Akiapolaau may not attain adult plumage until their third molt. In adult females, only the throat and upper breast become yellow, whereas in adult males the superciliaries, cheeks, and entire underparts...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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We studied the postfledging dispersal movements and habitat use of juvenile Snowy Egrets (Egretta thula) (SNEG) and Black-crowned Night-Herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) (BCNH) in coastal Virginia using a dye (picric acid) and radiotelemetry. Results from monitoring radiomarked birds revealed significant differences both years between species, with SNEGs dispersing more widely than BCNHs. BCNH juveniles usually remained south of Delaware, but SNEGs often moved into Delaware and southern New Jersey. The maximum dispersal distance found for a SNEG was ca 340 km north of the natal colony. Temporal patterns of movement followed logistic relationships, with rapid initial movements, but relatively few movements after about...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin
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The postnuptial and postjuvenal molts of Red-breasted Nuthatches occur from middle June to late September. Some birds may be nearly finished with the complete molt before other individuals begin, so that specimens taken at any given time may differ by as much as two months in the age of their plumage. No characters useful in ageing birds after the completion of the autumn molt were found.....The proposed racial subdivision of Sitta canadensis was based on misleading evidence resulting from variation of plumage age in birds assumed to be seasonally comparable, sooting of birds in industrialized parts of the country, and variation in quality of prepared specimens.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: The Wilson Bulletin


map background search result map search result map Nesting biology of laughing gulls <i>Larus atricilla</i> in relation to agricultural chemicals in south Texas USA 1978-1981 Nesting biology of laughing gulls <i>Larus atricilla</i> in relation to agricultural chemicals in south Texas USA 1978-1981