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The deserts of the Southwest are under increasing pressure from growing human populations for land development - for cities, agriculture, livestock grazing, transportation and utility corridors, power plants, military activities, mining, and recreation. While some anthropogenic activities were initiated in the mid-1800s and have continued to present day, others are relatively new. The cumulative effects of historic and recent anthropogenic activities on natural resources have been both local and regional in scope. In addition, natural processes, such as local weather and global climate change, exert important influences on the landscape.
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These data were used to examine the effectiveness of a non-lethal tool (Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis, "BIA") to estimate the physiological condition of endangered and threatened fishes in the Colorado River Basin. We conducted laboratory trials using hatchery-raised Humpback Chub and Bonytail and wild-captured Roundtail Chub, where fish were subjected to different feeding trials to elucidate a response in physiological condition and different temperature treatments to approximate field conditions. At the end of each 6-week trial fish were removed from tanks, lateral and dorsal measurements of BIA were taken, and fish were sacrificed for proximate composition analysis (lipid, protein, water, ash, dry mass, energy...
Mountain yellow-legged frogs (MYLF) comprise a historically abundant species complex (Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frogs, Rana sierrae, and mountain yellow-legged frogs, Rana muscosa) that occupied most high elevation aquatic habitats in the Sierra Nevada and Transverse and Peninsula ranges (Grinnell and Storer 1924, Vredenburg et al. 2005, 2007). In part because of their biphasic life cycle, MYLF are keystone species in montane food webs, and form a vital trophic link between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems (Finlay and Vredenburg 2007). In recent decades, MYLF have declined dramatically, and are now extirpated from more than 90% of their historic range (Drost and Fellers 1996, Vredenburg et al. 2007). These declines...
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Successful conservation strategies in the face of climate change will require careful consideration of how changing climate will affect wildlife and habitats. Development of innovative, data-driven, accessible tools will assist in understanding and planning for those effects. This project was funded to (1) develop climate envelope models and associated prediction maps for 26 federally threatened and endangered terrestrial (T&E) vertebrate species occurring in peninsular Florida, (2) provide a technical guidebook for use and interpretation of climate envelope models, (3) develop visualization and social networking tools that will allow natural resource managers and the general public to view our models, and (4) create...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Applications and Tools, Climate change, Climate envelope models, Completed, Conservation planning, All tags...
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US Fish and Wildlife Service Critical Habitat Units for Northern Spotted Owl and Marbled Murrelet for Oregon, Washington and California
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The EPiC / Urban Conservation Core Team is a small group of volunteers that provides leadership and direction for the EPiC / Urban Conservation Technical Advisory Group. Through a leadership role within the EPiC / Urban TAG, the Core Team helps initiate and guide dialogue in the larger community about developing common planning, actions, and evaluation for landscape scale urban conservation in the Midwest. The Urban Core Team Strategic Planning Workshop was an organizational meeting held to: 1. Discuss Green Infrastructure as an organizational framework for EPIC and receive feedback on EPIC. 2. Walk through the EPiC framework 3. Determine next steps on Core Team establishing mission, visions, goals/objectives.
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This dataset represents Canada Lynx (Lynx canadensis) linkage areas for Idaho, Montana, and portions of Utah and Wyoming. Linkage areas were identified by a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in August 2000. The data are represented at a scale of 1:100,000. The linkage areas are described in more detail in: Claar JJ, Bertram T, Naney R, Warren N and Ruediger W. 2004. Wildlife linkage areas: an integrated approach for Canada lynx. IN: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Ecology and Transportation, Eds. Irwin CL, Garrett P, McDermott KP. Center for Transportation and the Environment, North Carolina State University,...
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Mature, old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest provide critical habitat for threatened and endangered species, including the northern spotted owl and marbled murrelet. Dominated by large Douglas-firs and western hemlocks, these established forests range in age from 200 to 1,000 years old. Yet wildfire activity is increasing across western North America, heightening concerns about severe fires that have the potential to kill the upper canopy layer of forests. Known as “stand-replacing fires”, these extreme events have important implications for forest ecosystems, initiating forest regrowth and altering habitat for wildlife. Identifying locations that are protected from stand-replacing fire is an urgent management...


    map background search result map search result map Critical Habitat Units for Northern Spotted Owl and Marbled Murrelet Canada Lynx Linkage Areas for Northern Rockies Lynx Amendment Area EPiC Business Planning Core Team Meeting August 2015 Bioelectrical impedance analysis for an endangered desert fish—Data Climate Envelope Models in Support of Landscape Conservation Fire Refugia in Old-Growth Forests: Predicting Habitat Persistence to Support Land Management in an Era of Rapid Global Change Bioelectrical impedance analysis for an endangered desert fish—Data Fire Refugia in Old-Growth Forests: Predicting Habitat Persistence to Support Land Management in an Era of Rapid Global Change Critical Habitat Units for Northern Spotted Owl and Marbled Murrelet Canada Lynx Linkage Areas for Northern Rockies Lynx Amendment Area EPiC Business Planning Core Team Meeting August 2015 Climate Envelope Models in Support of Landscape Conservation