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Introduction Recent trends analysis examining the effectiveness of tidal wetland regulations and the regulatory program of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) revealed that the regulations and regulatory program were highly effective in stemming the historic "fill and build" activities. However, the trends also revealed that tidal wetlands—specifically, low marshes—were disappearing. To help determine the cause(s) of this loss, the NYSDEC, in collaboration with Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), established a monitoring program in 2008 that has been conducted on and in the tidal wetlands of East Creek,...
Scientific information, when reliably obtained and wisely applied, can strengthen our efforts to build resilient coastal communities before storms strike, and guide our response and recovery strategies after landfall. Documenting the height, extent, and timing of overland storm tide and wave dynamics across natural and man-made landscapes, is critical for improved storm-surge modeling for floodplain mapping and real-time forecasting. This leads to better planning, more effective early warning of storm-driven flooding, and strengthening of coastal resilience. The USGS Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) Network developed for the Northeastern Atlantic coast provides critical information on nearshore storm...
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Coastal Hydrology and Storm Surge Storm-surge is one of the most powerful and destructive elements of major storm events. Excessively high tides associated with storms can flood and inundate coastal areas, often moving sediment and altering coastal landscapes and drainages. USGS provides critical expertise in measuring storm surge and assessing conditions both before and after the storm. Through development of storm tide monitoring networks, data analysis, and data delivery, USGS provides vital information to help coastal communities prepare for and recover from storm surge events. View Fact Sheet Science Science Support for Tribes Tide gage/weather station installed in collaboration with Mashpee-Wampanoag Tribe....
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Introduction Ongoing efforts to improve the health of New York's South Shore Estuary Reserve (SSER) require continuously recorded water-quality data to understand the short-term effects of stormwater runoff and other pollution sources. To document the diel and tidal variability of water quality in the western bays of the SSER, the USGS monitors select physical and chemical parameters at two sites within the SSER. One site, station 01310740 on Reynolds Channel at Point Lookout, is near the estuary mouth and operated in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Town of Hempstead Department of Conservation & Waterways. The second, station 01311143...
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Problem Coastal communities are susceptible to damage from coastal storms and associated storm surge, and although tidal wetlands provide a buffer against shoreline erosion and aid in shoreline stabilization, they too are vulnerable to the action of storms. Tidal wetland dynamics need to be better understood, as they are also intrinsically valuable as nursery, feeding, and refuge areas for many commercial and recreational fisheries, and significantly contribute to the base of the marine food web. Wetlands trap sediments, reduce turbidity, and absorb nutrients and pollutants thereby improving water quality, and they provide many recreational opportunities. Tidal wetland stability needs to be assessed using a sediment...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Beach and Barrier dynamics, Climate and Land-Use Change, Climate and Land-Use Change, Climate and Land-Use Change, Coastal Science, All tags...
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Objective: The USGS New York Water Science Center (NYWSC) works with other Federal agencies as well as with State, municipal, and tribal agencies to provide research and data about water-related issues. Relevance and Impact: The NYWSC leads the scientific and water-resources management communities by providing high-quality, timely, and unbiased scientific data, reports, and other information that are widely accessible and understandable and that benefit science interests of all levels of government, academia, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and the general public. Statement of Problem: The NYWSC studies the effects of weather, climate, and manmade influences on groundwater levels, streamflow (discharge),...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Beach and Barrier Dynamics, Beach and Barrier Dynamics, Beach and Barrier dynamics, Coastal Science, Coastal Science, All tags...
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Following Hurricane Sandy, the USGS began construction of an overland Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) Network along the Northeastern Atlantic Coast from North Carolina to Maine. This network, developed collaboratively with numerous partners, features the integration of long-term tide gage networks, with real-time rapid-deployment gages (RDG) and mobile storm-tide sensors (STS). An element of the comprehensive strategy of SWaTH ensures that locations for most RDGs and STSs have been presurveyed to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) and equipped with receiving brackets. This permits rapid deployment and recovery of instrumentation and data dissemination in the hours and days immediately...


    map background search result map search result map Estuarine Physical Response to Storms—Jamaica Bay Monitoring Tidal Water Elevation and Water Quality to Assess Tidal Wetland Loss in Four Embayments of Long Island Sound, New York Hurricane Sandy -- Science to support coastal resilience South Shore Estuary Reserve Total Maximum Daily Load Monitoring Coastal Storm Response Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics Network (SWaTH) New York Water Science Center Data Program Estuarine Physical Response to Storms—Jamaica Bay Monitoring Tidal Water Elevation and Water Quality to Assess Tidal Wetland Loss in Four Embayments of Long Island Sound, New York South Shore Estuary Reserve Total Maximum Daily Load Monitoring New York Water Science Center Data Program Hurricane Sandy -- Science to support coastal resilience Coastal Storm Response Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics Network (SWaTH)