Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Turner, R.M. Collection (X)

71 results (691ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: This photograph provides a downstream view of the Grand Canyon from within Redwall Cavern, 53.3 kilometers below Lees Ferry. The cavern, formed by solution of the Mississippian Redwall Limestone is one of the major attractions of the Grand Canyon. Prior to the construction of Glen Canyon Dam, the river entered the cavern during high flows producing conditions too unstable for plant establishment. Powell camped here during a rainstorm and noted that the floor would be inundated during periods of peak flow by a "raging flood." Waves during an earlier period of high water have produced marks in the sand that are high above the river level in this view. Erosion of the alluvium is apparent...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The foreground rocks show little change in 102 years since the first photograph of this pair (photo no. 41) was taken, near the mouth of Lava Canyon 105.4 kilometers below Lees Ferry. On the opposite shore, the bare sandy beach of the previous century is now covered by sandbar willow and saltcedar with minor inclusions of seep willow and arrowweed. The zone with western honey mesquite and catclaw is little changed and, although not discernible in this view, is separated from the riparian vegetation bordering the river by an open zone of mainly ephemeral plants. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. Published as Figure 47-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: This view, taken in March, shows a greatly diminished flood-line community, but this reduction in plant biomass is more apparent than real-the shrubs comprising the community are leafless at this season, whereas in the 1923 photograph, taken in September, the plants were in full leaf. The streamside plants that were present in 1923 and which persist to the present are willows. Unlike the condition in 1923, the beach at Granite Park now supports a dense growth of plants. The dominant species on the beach are willow, arrowweed, saltcedar, camelthorn, red brome, and Bermuda grass. All but the first two species have been introduced to this continent from other parts of the world. Feral...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The line of shrubs seen in photo no. 57 is composed of catclaw and appears to be little changed. Both views were taken in September, a month when the shrubs are in full leaf. The camera is too far back for an exact match. The catclaw right of center has grown in size. The herbaceous plants of the foreground slope are approximately as dense now as in 1923. This camera station is on a well-traveled burro trail. Saltcedar grows densely along sandy stretches on the opposite bank and long-leaf brickellia grows in an open stand on the rocky areas. The sand deposits on the opposite bank of the Colorado River are less thick than in 1923. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona....
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The row of shrubs marking the predam high flood stage is catclaw and has persisted with little change through almost half the century. The new riparian community comprises several species, including saltcedar, seep willow, waterweed, Emory seep willow, cattail, and desert isocoma. A rock avalanche at upper right is new since 1923. The mouth of Kanab Creek is at left foreground. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. August 24, 1972. Published as Figure 57B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The old camera station lies beneath Lake Mead silt several meters below and to the right of the new position. Before Hoover Dam was built the thalweg altitude was roughly 275 meters; now the thalweg altitude exceeds 350.5 meters, representing an accumulation of 76.2 meters of sediment. Saltcedar is the only plant seen on the deeply cracked silt deposit. Many of the plants are dead in this August view, presumably from submergence during earlier months when this site was covered by water to a depth of 2.7 to 3.7 meters. Some taller plants survived. Seedlings growing from the deep cracks in the foreground became established after the water receded. This scene illustates the dynamic nature...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: Kanab Creek (left foreground) enters the Colorado River 231.2 kilometers below Lees Ferry and is seen here from a camera station approximately 100 meters above the river. Powell ended his second trip here in 1872, leaving the Grand Canyon via Kanab Canyon. The Middle Cambrian Muav Limestone is exposed at the entrance to Kanab Canyon, with Mississippian Redwall Limestone and Devonian Temple Butte Limestone forming the vertical walls above. The development of a well-defined row of shtrubs above the position of maximum flood stage is the most conspicuous feature of the vegetation in this view. (Altitude 572 meters). Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. September 10, 1923....
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: This upstream view was taken from a point just above Spring Canyon, 328.9 kilometers below Lees Ferry. The Middle Cambrian Bright Angel Shale, mostly covered by slope wash, is at river level. A well-developed community occurs above the flood line on both sides of the river. At the present river stage, a large bar, unoccupied by plants, is exposed. (Altitude 454 meters). Coconino and Mohave Counties, Arizona. 1923. (Photo no. 633 by E.C. LaRue). Portion published as Figure 61A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: Saltcedar, growing to heights of 6 meters, is the dominant plant on the site. Longleaf brickellia (right foreground), wire lettuce, and spiny aster are also present. Man seated at left for scale. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. August 23, 1972. Published as Figure 38-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: Comparison of this photograph with the earlier one (photo no. 32) reveals several changes. The impact of wave action is not apparent away from the river, but wind ripples are evident in the sand of the foreground. Using the collapse blocks as references, it is apparent that aggradation, perhaps from the wind, has occurred on the higher parts of the beach, and erosion has reduced the sand deposit toward the base of the sloping beach. The sand bar across the river to the right appears new. The only plants visible are scattered saltcedars. The lack of more vegetation probably results from the low light intensity within the cavern and trampling by the thousands of visitors that stop here...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: This matching photograph was taken in March before many of the shrubs and trees in the valley were in full leaf. The preceding photograph (photo no. 36) was taken in August when foliage was fully developed. Because the decrease in density of the plants at A might be the result of differences in seasonal development, additional photographs, taken by John Richardson, Southern Illinois University, in July 1978, were obtained. These photographs (not shown) were taken at a time of maxiumum leaf development and reveal the same decline in the predam flood-line community as in this March view. The dense thicket on the terrace above the boats (at B) was thinned by a wildfire that burned through...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The mouth of the Little Colorado River as seen from Cape Solitude, 1,167 meters above the river level. This upstream view of the Colorado River was taken after the completion of Glen Canyon Dam and during a period of low flow when Lake Powell was filling. From this vantage point, the interrupted line of dense vegetation marking the flood level is visible, especially on the left bank. A few shrubs (circle) have become established below the upper fringe of plants. The Little Colorado River enters from the right, and its waters appear turbid in this July view. A dense stand of riparian vegetation lines its left bank. (Altitude is 826 meters). Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County,...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The Lower Marble Canyon ends at about kilometer 414.3 and the steep walls of the Inner Gorge give way to less steep talus slopes. In this veiw, looking down the canyon of the Colorado River 437.6 kilometers below Lees Ferry, the flood-line community is well developed above the conspicuous highwater line. The Middle Cambrian Bright Angel Shale is at river level. Typical Mohave Desertscrub species of the foreground include ocotillo, white bursage, and agave. The flood-line community includes western honey mesquite and catclaw. (Altitude 282 meters). Grand Canyon National Park. Mohave County, Arizona. October 13, 1923. (Photo no. 747 by E.C. LaRue). Portion published as Figure 72A in...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: This upstream view was taken from a point 168 meters above the Colorado River and shows Granite Park, 336 kolometers below Lees Ferry. A flood-line community is strongly developed along this section of the canyon. Some trees have become established at the edge of the river, a habitat that is here more stable than usual because of the great width of the valley floor. (Altitude 442 meters). Grand Canyon National Park. Mohave County, Arizona. September 28, 1923. (Photo no. 642 by E.C. LaRue). Portion published as Figure 64A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: This downstream view shows the debris fan at the mouth of Fossil Canyon (out of view on left), 200.8 kilometers below Lees Ferry. The Middle Cambrian Bright Angel Shale is exposed near river level through this reach of the canyon, although it is mostly covered by slope wash. A line of scattered shrubs marks the high water line above the barren beach of rocks and patches of sand. (Altittude 623 meters). Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. September 6, 1923. (Photo no. 514 by E.C. LaRue). Portion published as Figure 54A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: Many of the redbuds appear dead in the photograph; however, since this photograph was taken many plants have been periodically observed to have progressively recovered. Many herbaceous plants now grow within the old scour zone, including scouring rush, watercress, and monkey flower. These plants were reported at Vaseys Paradise by Clover and Jotter (1944) in 1948 and were probably among those plants seen in the 1923 photograph (photo no. 30). Saltcedar (right foreground ) is now established on the gravel bar near the camera station. Colorado River. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. March 17, 1974. Published as Figure 41-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional...
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The tree on the right is saltcedar. The dominant small shrub on the fan is longleaf brickellia. Shrubs occur at scattered localities on the opposite side of the river. Since Powell's trip, there has developed in this short reach of the canyon an open terrestrial biotic community. Colorado River. Portion of a boat with passengers visible near the center for scale. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. Published as Figure 40-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: The camera station is too far forward and too far to the right for an exact match.The plants that densely occupy the higher ground of the old bar include saltcedar, seep willow, desert broom, catclaw, arrowweed, and some large western honey mesquites. The present exposed bar is probably low enough to be inundated by the regular daily high flows. Because of the slightly darker tones of western honey mesquite and catclaw foliage compared to the color of the riparian plants, the contact between the old high-water community and the new riparian community is apparent. Across the river where the talus slopes have a northerly aspect, the highwater community is mostly western honey mesquite...
thumbnail
Album caption: The new flood line now lies below the large rock and several plants of brittlebush grow on the slope between the new and old flood lines. The bar in the foreground is unusual in that no plants have become established there. The Inner Gorge is narrow here and during times of high flow the bar is flooded, making for an unstable surface for plant establishment. Men in raft by sand bar for scale. Grand Canyon National Park. Mohave County, Arizona. August 26, 1972. No index card. Published as Figure 70B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1132. 1980.
thumbnail
Album caption and index card: View down the V-shaped canyon cut through Precambrian metamorphic rocks. The stratified formation capping the Precambrian rocks is the Lower and Middle Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone. The far skyline is defined by a formation of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Supai Group. The sand deposit in the foreground and the one across the river are both at the mouths of minor tributary canyons 360.7 kilometers below Lees Ferry. A flood line is apparent from stains on the rocks of the opposite shore and no plants are visible below that level. (Altitude 408 meters). Grand Canyon National Park. Mohave County, Arizona. October 2, 1923. (Photo no. 665 by E.C. LaRue). Portion published as Figure 67A in...


map background search result map search result map Saltcedar, growing to heights of 6 meters, is the dominant plant on the site. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. Colorado River. The tree on the right is saltcedar. The dominant small shrub on the fan is longleaf brickellia. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. Many of the redbuds appear dead; however, since this photograph was taken many plants have been periodically observed to have progressively recovered. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. The impact of wave action is not apparent away from the river, but wind ripples are evident in the sand of the foreground. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. This photo was taken in March before many of the shrubs and trees in the valley were in full leaf. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. Mouth of the Little Colorado River, viewed from Cape Solitude, 1,167 meters above the river level. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1963. Near the mouth of Lava Canyon 105.4 kilometers below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. The plants that densely occupy the higher ground of the old bar include saltcedar, seep willow, desert broom, catclaw, arrowweed, and some large western honey mesquites. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino and Mohave Counties, Arizona. 1974. Downstream view of the Grand Canyon from within Redwall Cavern, 53.3 kilometers below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. This downstream view shows the debris fan at the mouth of Fossil Canyon below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Saltcedar grows densely along sandy stretches on the opposite bank and long-leaf brickellia grows in an open stand on the rocky areas. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1976. Kanab Creek, shown in the left foreground, enters the Colorado River 231.2 km below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. The row of shrubs marking the predam high flood stage is catclaw and has persisted with little change through almost half the century. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. View of the Middle Cambrian Bright Angel Shale, covered by slope wash, taken from a point above Spring Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino and Mohave Counties, Arizona. 1923. A view of Granite Park taken from a position above the Colorado River. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1923. View of Granite Park and the dominant plant species of willow, arrowweed, saltcedar, camelthorn, red brome, and Bermuda grass. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1974. View down the V-shaped canyon, showing Lower and Middle Tapeats Sandstone. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1923. Image of the new flood line, situated below the large rock and several plants of brittlebush that grow on the slope between the new and old flood lines. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1972. View down Lower Marble Canyon below Lees Ferry, showing a well-developed flood-line community. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1923. View of the dynamic nature of the saltcedar community on Lake Mead silt. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1972. A view of Granite Park taken from a position above the Colorado River. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1923. View of Granite Park and the dominant plant species of willow, arrowweed, saltcedar, camelthorn, red brome, and Bermuda grass. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1974. View down the V-shaped canyon, showing Lower and Middle Tapeats Sandstone. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1923. Image of the new flood line, situated below the large rock and several plants of brittlebush that grow on the slope between the new and old flood lines. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1972. View down Lower Marble Canyon below Lees Ferry, showing a well-developed flood-line community. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1923. View of the dynamic nature of the saltcedar community on Lake Mead silt. Grand Canyon National Park, Mohave County, Arizona. 1972. Saltcedar, growing to heights of 6 meters, is the dominant plant on the site. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. Colorado River. The tree on the right is saltcedar. The dominant small shrub on the fan is longleaf brickellia. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. Many of the redbuds appear dead; however, since this photograph was taken many plants have been periodically observed to have progressively recovered. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. The impact of wave action is not apparent away from the river, but wind ripples are evident in the sand of the foreground. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. This photo was taken in March before many of the shrubs and trees in the valley were in full leaf. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. Mouth of the Little Colorado River, viewed from Cape Solitude, 1,167 meters above the river level. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1963. Near the mouth of Lava Canyon 105.4 kilometers below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1974. Downstream view of the Grand Canyon from within Redwall Cavern, 53.3 kilometers below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. This downstream view shows the debris fan at the mouth of Fossil Canyon below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Saltcedar grows densely along sandy stretches on the opposite bank and long-leaf brickellia grows in an open stand on the rocky areas. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1976. Kanab Creek, shown in the left foreground, enters the Colorado River 231.2 km below Lees Ferry. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. The row of shrubs marking the predam high flood stage is catclaw and has persisted with little change through almost half the century. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1972. The plants that densely occupy the higher ground of the old bar include saltcedar, seep willow, desert broom, catclaw, arrowweed, and some large western honey mesquites. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino and Mohave Counties, Arizona. 1974. View of the Middle Cambrian Bright Angel Shale, covered by slope wash, taken from a point above Spring Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino and Mohave Counties, Arizona. 1923.