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An estimated value for the ability of managers to dirct actions to protect, restore, or mitigate species and habitats. We recognize that our preliminary estimates are arbitrary and fairly approximate, but argue that making these explicit within a framework will enable stakeholders and managers to conduct subsequent analyses to better support their decision making.
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UPDATE 9/24/2014. Resilience concerns the ability of a living system to adjust to climate change, to moderate potential damages, to take advantage of opportunities, or to cope with consequences; in short, its capacity to adapt. In this project we aim to identify the most resilient examples of key geophysical settings (e.g. sand plains, granite mountains, limestone valleys, etc.) to provide conservationists with a nuanced picture of the places where conservation is most likely to succeed over centuries. The project had three parts: 1) identifying and mapping the geophysical settings, 2) developing a quantitative estimate of resilience for each setting based on landscape complexity and permeability, and 3) identifying...
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The regional flow patterns dataset was designed to identify potential larger-scale directional movements and pinpoint the areas where they are likely to become concentrated, diffused, or rerouted, due to the structure of the landscape. We used the software tool Circuitscape (McRae and Shah 2009, http://www.circuitscape.org/) based on electric circuit theory, to model these larger flow patterns for the region. Like the local connectedness analysis, the underlying data for this analysis was land-cover and road data converted to a resistance grid by assigning weights to the cell types based on their similarity to cells of natural cover. However, instead of quantifying local neighborhoods, the Circuitscape program calculates...
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This file contains the resilient sites for terrestrial resilience. There are 4 main classes of sites (sybmolize on class field):CLASS 1 - Priority Climate and Current Biodiversity Area: These 312 areas contain significant conservation features AND qualify as natural strongholds for biodiversity in the face of climate change. We recommend that strategies be implemented to prevent these places from degradation by development, fragmentation, or inappropriate management. CLASS 2 - Priority Climate Area: these areas qualify as natural strongholds for biodiversity but need further investigation to confirm that they have significant existing biological features such as rare species or exemplary natural communities. Of...
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The regional flow patterns dataset was designed to identify potential larger-scale directional movements and pinpoint the areas where they are likely to become concentrated, diffused, or rerouted, due to the structure of the landscape. We used the software tool Circuitscape (McRae and Shah 2009, http://www.circuitscape.org/) based on electric circuit theory, to model these larger flow patterns for the region. Like the local connectedness analysis, the underlying data for this analysis was land-cover and road data converted to a resistance grid by assigning weights to the cell types based on their similarity to cells of natural cover. However, instead of quantifying local neighborhoods, the Circuitscape program calculates...
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An estimated value for the ability of managers to dirct actions to protect, restore, or mitigate species and habitats. We recognize that our preliminary estimates are arbitrary and fairly approximate, but argue that making these explicit within a framework will enable stakeholders and managers to conduct subsequent analyses to better support their decision making.
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This dataset is one of a dozen or so datasets that provide the basis for a vulnerability assessment of the Great Northern LCC that examines land use and climate changes at landscape scales, for the full LCC boundary. It is an exposure variable that represents the climate velocity for Rehfeldt biome-habitat types (from 2000 to 2060), where units are in km/year.
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Fire in the western U.S. poses one of the greatest threats to human and ecological communities alike. In fact, fire management is the largest single expenditure of land management funds on federal lands. Now, climate change is altering wildfire patterns. Climate change in the West is creating warmer and drier conditions, resulting in an increase in the amount of dead vegetation available to fuel fires. This project seeks to assess the vulnerability of forests in the southwestern U.S. to climate change and wildfire, in order to understand how these ecosystems might become altered as a result. Researchers will examine (a) how climate change will impact wildfires in the region, to better understand fire risk; (b)...
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This dataset is one of a dozen or so datasets that provide the basis for a vulnerability assessment of the Great Northern LCC that examines land use and climate changes at landscape scales, for the full LCC boundary. It represents terrestrially-defined adaptive capacity, where values run from 0 to 1.0 and is calculated as the complement of the degree of human modification (1-H). The original floating point values ranging from 0-1.0 were multiplied by 100 and converted to integer format for this dataset.
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This dataset is one of a dozen or so datasets that provide the basis for a vulnerability assessment of the Great Northern LCC that examines land use and climate changes at landscape scales, for the full LCC boundary. It represents hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity, where values run from 0 to 1.0 and is calculated as the complement of the degree of human modification (1-H), and are then averaged using hierarchical watersheds. The original floating point values ranging from 0-1.0 were multiplied by 100 and converted to integer format for this dataset.
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Resilience concerns the ability of a living system to adjust to climate change, to moderate potential damages, to take advantage of opportunities, or to cope with consequences; in short, its capacity to adapt. In this project we aim to identify the most resilient examples of key geophysical settings (e.g. sand plains, granite mountains, limestone valleys, etc.) to provide conservationists with a nuanced picture of the places where conservation is most likely to succeed over centuries. The project had three parts: 1) identifying and mapping the geophysical settings, 2) developing a quantitative estimate of resilience for each setting based on landscape complexity and permeability, and 3) identifying key linkages...
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This dataset is one of a dozen or so datasets that provide the basis for a vulnerability assessment of the Great Northern LCC that examines land use and climate changes at landscape scales, for the full LCC boundary. It represents a combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and terrestrially-defined adaptive capacity (Ag). Values run from 0 to 1.0 and is calculated as: Agp = EH x Ag. The original floating point values ranging from 0-1.0 were multiplied by 100 and converted to integer format for this dataset.
Salmonids, a group of coldwater-adapted fishes of enormous ecological and socio-economic value, historically inhabited a variety of freshwater habitats throughout the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Over the past century, however, populations have dramatically declined due to habitat loss, overharvest, and invasive species. Consequently, many populations are listed as threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Complicating these stressors is global warming and associated climate change. Overall, aquatic ecosystems across the PNW are predicted to experience increasingly earlier snowmelt in the spring, reduced late spring and summer flows, increased winter flooding, warmer and drier summers, increased...
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This dataset is one of a dozen or so datasets that provide the basis for a vulnerability assessment of the Great Northern LCC that examines land use and climate changes at landscape scales, for the full LCC boundary. It represents terrestrially-defined adaptive capacity, where values run from 0 to 1.0 and is calculated as the complement of the degree of human modification (1-H). The original floating point values ranging from 0-1.0 were multiplied by 100 and converted to integer format for this dataset.
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This dataset represents The Nature Conservancy's Terrestrial Resilience symbolized by Geophysical Settings (90m Resilience is also included in the download of this dataset). Resilience concerns the ability of a living system to adjust to climate change, to moderate potential damages, to take advantage of opportunities, or to cope with consequences; in short, its capacity to adapt. In this project we aim to identify the most resilient examples of key geophysical settings (e.g. sand plains, granite mountains, limestone valleys, etc.) to provide conservationists with a nuanced picture of the places where conservation is most likely to succeed over centuries. The project had three parts: 1) identifying and mapping...
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Resilience concerns the ability of a living system to adjust to climate change, to moderate potential damages, to take advantage of opportunities, or to cope with consequences; in short, its capacity to adapt. In this project we aim to identify the most resilient examples of key geophysical settings (e.g. sand plains, granite mountains, limestone valleys, etc.) to provide conservationists with a nuanced picture of the places where conservation is most likely to succeed over centuries. The project had three parts: 1) identifying and mapping the geophysical settings, 2) developing a quantitative estimate of resilience for each setting based on landscape complexity and permeability, and 3) identifying key linkages...
This research project sought to understand the ways in which aspects of Native American culture have been affected by climate change in the Northwest region of the U.S. There are aspects of tribal culture, such as songs, stories, prayers, and dances that include Mish, wildlife, or plants as central images or main symbolic Migures, and therefore may be affected by environmentally driven changes. The intimate connections that tribes have maintained with the natural environment are more spiritually rich and complex than non-Native consumptive views of natural resources. After careful consideration of tribe size, level of cultural activity, strength of ties to the environment, and connection to culturally significant...


    map background search result map search result map The Vulnerability of Forests to Climate Change and Wildfire in the Southwestern U.S. Geophysical Settings 1000 A Hexagons, Northern Appalachians/Acadians Resilience Stratified by Setting and Ecoregion with Regional Override, Northern Appalachians/Acadians Regional Flow Patterns Grouped Regional Flow Patterns Basic Hexagons for Resilience Resilient Sites Adaptive Capacity, High Range Adaptive Capacity, Low Range Local Connectedness 1000 A Hexagons Stratified by Geophysical Setting and Ecoregion, Northern Appalachians Ag: terrestrially defined adaptive capacity for Great Northern LCC Agp: combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and terrestrially-defined adaptive capacity (Ag) for Great Northern LCC Aw: hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity for Great Northern LCC Awp: combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity (Aw) for Great Northern LCC Ehv: climate velocity for Rehfeldt biome-habitat types (km/year). The Vulnerability of Forests to Climate Change and Wildfire in the Southwestern U.S. Adaptive Capacity, High Range Adaptive Capacity, Low Range Resilient Sites Basic Hexagons for Resilience Geophysical Settings 1000 A Hexagons, Northern Appalachians/Acadians Local Connectedness 1000 A Hexagons Stratified by Geophysical Setting and Ecoregion, Northern Appalachians Resilience Stratified by Setting and Ecoregion with Regional Override, Northern Appalachians/Acadians Grouped Regional Flow Patterns Ag: terrestrially defined adaptive capacity for Great Northern LCC Agp: combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and terrestrially-defined adaptive capacity (Ag) for Great Northern LCC Aw: hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity for Great Northern LCC Awp: combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity (Aw) for Great Northern LCC Ehv: climate velocity for Rehfeldt biome-habitat types (km/year). Regional Flow Patterns