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These data represent several benthic cores collected near chemosynthetic seep habitats during 2009 and 2012. Sediment cores were collected near several natural hydrocarbon seeps with ROV deployed push cores. The purpose of these samples is to examine benthic communities associated with natural hydrocarbon seepage in the deep sea as well as compare these communities to areas associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil blowout. Samples were collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico, mostly south of Louisiana, and at depths ranging from 500 to 2600 meters. Sample processing and species identification occurred from 2014 – 2016. Macrofauna (>300 um) were identified to the lowest taxonomic unit.
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Mesopelagic fishes represent an important component of the marine food web due to their global distributions, high abundances and ability to transport organic material throughout a large part of the water column. This study combined stable isotope (SIA) and gut content analyses (GCA) to characterize the trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the north central Gulf of Mexico. Additionally this study examined whether mesopelagic fishes utilized chemosynthetic energy from cold seeps. Specimens were collected (9-25 August 2007) over three deep (>1000 m) cold seeps at discrete depths (surface to 1503 m) over the diurnal cycle. Gut content analyses classified 31 species (5 families) of mesopelagic fishes into 5 feeding...
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Submarine canyons are morphologically complex systems, acting as major conduits of organic matter along continental shelves, promoting gradients in food resources, habitat heterogeneity, and areas of sediment resuspension and deposition. Often environmental conditions within canyons can be highly distinct, particularly in different parts of the canyon and in contrast to adjacent slopes. Here we examine how biogeochemical drivers shape the differences between canyon and slope infaunal communities in Baltimore and Norfolk Canyons in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region. Specific comparisons included macrofaunal communities in Norfolk canyons and adjacent slope, hard substrate associated macrofaunal communities in Norfolk...
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Chemosynthetic ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) support dense communities of seep megafaunal invertebrates that rely on endosymbiotic bacteria for nutrition. Distinct infaunal communities are associated with the biogenic habitats created by seep biota, where habitat heterogeneity and sediment geochemistry influence local macrofaunal community structure. Here we examine the variance in infaunal communities in the GOM with respect to depth, sediment geochemistry parameters, and distance to known seep habitats. Habitats were mapped based on ROV video of the seafloor. Samples were collected from three sites (AC601, GC852, and AT340) via box core in 2007 and processed for macrofauna and environmental characteristics....


    map background search result map search result map Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico revealed by gut content and stable isotope analyses Benthic infaunal communities of Baltimore and Norfolk canyons Macrobenthic infaunal communities associated with deep-sea hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico, 2009-2010 The influence of hydrocarbon seeps on sediment macrofaunal biodiversity and functional traits Benthic infaunal communities of Baltimore and Norfolk canyons Macrobenthic infaunal communities associated with deep-sea hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico, 2009-2010 The influence of hydrocarbon seeps on sediment macrofaunal biodiversity and functional traits Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico revealed by gut content and stable isotope analyses