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Abstract: As the climate changes, human land use may impede species from tracking areas with suitable climates. Maintaining connectivity between areas of different temperatures could allow organisms to move along temperature gradients and allow species to continue to occupy the same temperature space as the climate warms. We used a coarse-filter approach to identify broad corridors for movement between areas where human influence is low while simultaneously routing the corridors along present-day spatial gradients of temperature. We modified a cost–distance algorithm to model these corridors and tested the model with data on current land-use and climate patterns in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The...
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This project is intended to increase the utility of the International Shorebird Survey (ISS) for making shorebird management and conservation decisions within the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative. A secondary goal is to create a single, effective data management system that can service all partners along the Atlantic coast (e.g., National Wildlife Refuges, South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative, and State Wildlife Areas). Ultimately, the ISS data management system would be equivalent to the Northeast Avian Data Center and the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory Avian Data Center.
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This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in Bristol Bay communities. Climate change impacts were assessed through the lens of public health, with an eye towards the potential effects on disease, injury, food and water security, and mental health. Three focal communities were included in this assessment: Nondalton, a lake community, Levelock, a river community, and Pilot Point, a coastal community. The resulting assessment reports will be used to assist focal communities, as well as neighboring communities, in addressing climate-change related issues.
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There is a need to understand how alteration of physical processes on the Rio Grande River have impacted aquatic biota and their habitats, and a need to predict potential future effects of climate change on biotic resources in order to prescribe research and management activities that will enhance conservation of aquatic species. We propose a project with the goal of developing monitoring recommendations and identifying research needs for aquatic ecological resources in the Big Bend region of the Rio Grande. This goal will be targeted by synthesizing and analyzing available data and literature for aquatic species in the project region. In particular, we will work to develop time series of abundance and population...
Nearshore bathymetry is a vital link that joins offshore water depths to coastal topography. Seamless water depth information is a critical input parameter for reliable storm surge models, enables the calculation of sediment budgets and is necessary baseline data for a range of coastal management decisions. Funding from the Western Alaska LCC resulted in the purchase of field equipment capable of shallow water measurements in rural settings, allowing collection of nearshore bathymetry around western Alaska communities. The resulting vector data shape files of nearshore bathymetry for Gambell, Savoonga, Golovin, Wales, Shismaref, and Hooper Bay are available by following the link below.
Coastal ecosystems have been identified by the International Panel on Climate Change (2007) as areasthat will be disproportionally affected by climate change. Recent sea-level rise projections range from 0.57to 1.1 m (Jevrejeva et al. 2012) or 0.75 to 1.9 m by Grinsted et al. (2010) and Vermeer and Rahmstorf(2009) by 2100, which are contingent upon the ambient temperature conditions and CO2 emissions. Sealevelrise projections for San Francisco Bay are 1.24 m by 2100 (Cayan et al. 2008). The expectedaccelerated rate of sea-level rise through the 21st century will put many coastal ecosystems at risk,especially those in topographically low-gradient areas.Sea-level rise response modeling was conducted at 12 tidal salt...
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This dataset includes Snow Free Date(sfdy) for northern Alaska in GeoTiff format, covering the years 1980-2012. Snow Free Date is defined as day of the end of the core snow period(day of year). The core snow season is defined to be the longest period of continuous snow cover in each year. The dataset was generated by the Arctic LCC SNOWDATA: Snow Datasets for Arctic Terrestrial Applications project.“Day-of-year” (doy) output is expressed in Ordinal dates (“1” on 1 January, and “365” on 31 December). Dates have not been corrected for leap years. This output is appropriate for display purposes, as it is readily interpreted as calendar day of year. It is not recommended as input for analysis, as it may produce incorrect...
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This dataset includes Snow Depth(snod) for northern Alaska in GeoTiff format, covering the years 1980-2012. Snow Depth is defined as depth on 1 March(m). The dataset was generated by the Arctic LCC SNOWDATA: Snow Datasets for Arctic Terrestrial Applications project.The dataset is delivered in the ZIP archive file format. Each year is output in a separate GeoTiff file, where the year is indicated by the filename.Over the last 20 years, under a variety of NOAA, NSF, and NASA research programs, a snow-evolution modeling system has been developed that includes the MicroMet micrometeorological model, the SnowModel snow-process model, and the SnowAssim data assimilation model. These modeling tools can be thought of as...
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Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) have a life-history strategy specifically adapted to the extreme climate of the North. These fish migrate to spawning grounds just after breakup in the spring, then migrate to feeding sites in early summer, and finally in the fall migrate back to their overwintering sites. The Kuparuk River is a perennial stream originating in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range on the North Slope of Alaska. Sections of the Kuparuk are periodically intermittent in that, during low flows in the system, these channel reaches appear dry. The flow varies between surface and subsurface in this permafrost-dominated environment, with subsurface flow being limited to the unfrozen thaw bulb around...
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Average historical annual total precipitation (inches) and projected relative change in total precipitation (% change from baseline) for Northern Alaska. 30-year averages. Handout format. Maps created using the SNAP 5-GCM composite (AR5-RCP 8.5) and CRU TS3.1.01 datasets.
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More than 35,000 lakes larger than 0.01 sq. km. were extracted from an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) derived digital surface model acquired between 2002 and 2006 for the Western Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska. The IfSAR derived lake data layer provides an improvement over previously available datasets for the study area since it is more comprehensive and contemporary. Attributes assigned to the IfSAR-derived lake dataset include: area, lake elevation, elevation in 10, 25, 50, and 100 m buffers around a lake perimeter, the difference in elevation between the lake and these various buffers, whether a particular lake had a detectable drainage gradient exceeding 1.2 m, whether a...
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Rainwater Harvesting and Stormwater Research is a priority research area identified by the Arizona Governor’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Water Sustainability, which recommended that universities take the lead to identify regulatory barriers, cost and benefits, water quality issues and avenues for increasing utilization of stormwater and rainwater at the regional, community and individual property level. In an effort to address the priority research area, the University of Arizona will develop a decision support tool to be used by public utilities and agencies to evaluate suitability and cost-effectiveness of rainwater and stormwater capture at various scales for multiple benefits. Data from the City of Tucson, Arizona...
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Watersheds draining the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska are dominated by permafrostand snowmelt runoff that create abundant surface storage in the form of lakes, wetlands, and beaded streams. These surface water elements compose complex drainage networks that affect aquatic ecosystem connectivity and hydrologic behavior. The 4676 km2 Fishand Creek drainage basin is composed of three watersheds that represent a gradient of theACP landscape with varying extents of eolian, lacustrine, and fluvial landforms. In each watershed, we analyzed 2.5-m-resolution aerial photography, a 5-m digital elevationmodel, and river gauging and climate records to better understand ACP watershed structureand processes. We show that...
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Baseline (1961-1990) average winter total precipitation and projected change in precipitation for the northern portion of Alaska. For the purposes of these maps, ‘winter’ is defined as December - February. The Alaska portion of the Arctic LCC’s terrestrial boundary is depicted by the black line. Baseline results for 1961-1990 are derived from Climate Research Unit (CRU) TS 3.1.01 data and downscaled to 2km grids; results for the other time periods (2010-2039, 2040-2069, 2070-2099) are based on the SNAP 5-GCM composite using the AR5-RCP 8.5, downscaled to 2km grids.
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The Pectoral Sandpiper is one of the most abundant breeding birds on the Arctic Coastal Plain ofAlaska. They typically have low nest site fidelity which is likely related to their promiscuousmating strategy, thus nest densities are highly variable from year to year at a given site (Holmesand Pitelka 1998). In Arctic Alaska, primary breeding habitat includes low-lying ponds in a mixof marshy to hummocky tundra and nests are typically placed in slightly raised or better drainedsites (Holmes and Pitelka 1998). Pectoral Sandpipers spend their winters primarily in southernSouth America (Holmes and Pitelka 1998). The current North American population estimate is500,000 and they are believed to be declining (Morrison et...
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This pilot project has initiated a long-term integrated modeling project that aims todevelop a dynamically linked model framework focused on climate driven changes tovegetation, disturbance, hydrology, and permafrost, and their interactions and feedbacks.This pilot phase has developed a conceptual framework for linking current state-of-thesciencemodels of ecosystem processes in Alaska – ALFRESCO, TEM, GIPL-1 – and theprimary processes of vegetation, disturbance, hydrology, and permafrost that theysimulate. A framework that dynamically links these models has been defined and primaryinput datasets required by the models have been developed.
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Stream physical parameter time series files for six or more beaded streams on the North Slope of Alaska in the Fish Creek Watershed near Nuiqsut. These include time series of water temperature (pool bed and surface and channel runs) and pool stage and correspond stream discharge developed from a rating curve.
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The Geographic Information Network for Alaska will complete uniform and consistent ecological mapping of the North Slope region and provide a summary of existing field site ecological descriptions (including photos) in a web based environment. Existing automated field information and photos that have reliable geolocation information will be compiled and entered in a web based geographic display based on the ecological mapping.


map background search result map search result map Utility Guide to Rainwater/Stormwater Harvesting as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change Ecological changes in aquatic communities in the Big Bend reach of the Rio Grande: Synthesis and future monitoring needs Enhancing the utility of International Shorebird Survey data management SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Free Date (year) SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Depth Annual Precipitation Maps - RCP 8.5, Inches Linking North Slope of Alaska climate, hydrology, and fish migration Climate Change Health Assessments for Three Coastal, Riverine and Lake System Communities Drainage Network Structure and Hydrologic Behavior of Three Lake-Rich Watersheds on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska Winter Precipitation Maps - RCP 8.5, Inches Western Arctic Coastal Plain, Coastline and Coastal Features Pectoral Sandpiper Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Model Pilot Year Final Report Fish Creek Watershed Data Ecological Landscapes and Field Site Web-based Tool Vegetation dynamics related to climate and  land use in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands Linking North Slope of Alaska climate, hydrology, and fish migration Ecological changes in aquatic communities in the Big Bend reach of the Rio Grande: Synthesis and future monitoring needs Drainage Network Structure and Hydrologic Behavior of Three Lake-Rich Watersheds on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska Fish Creek Watershed Data Vegetation dynamics related to climate and  land use in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands Western Arctic Coastal Plain, Coastline and Coastal Features Climate Change Health Assessments for Three Coastal, Riverine and Lake System Communities Pectoral Sandpiper Ecological Landscapes and Field Site Web-based Tool Enhancing the utility of International Shorebird Survey data management Utility Guide to Rainwater/Stormwater Harvesting as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Free Date (year) SNOWDATA GeoTIFF Annual Snow Depth Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Model Pilot Year Final Report Annual Precipitation Maps - RCP 8.5, Inches Winter Precipitation Maps - RCP 8.5, Inches