Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: ecological processes (X)

45 results (54ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
The surface disturbance footprint raster data set quantifies the percent surface disturbance from development at a 90-meter resolution. The surface disturbance footprint is used to compute a multiscale index of landscape intactness for the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) landscape approach. The surface disturbance footprint is mapped for the western United States (17 states), by compiling and combining spatial data for four development disturbance variable classes. Development classes include urban land cover (impervious surface), agriculture (cropland), energy and mineral extraction and transport (oil and gas wells, solar arrays, wind turbines, surface mines, pipelines, and transmission lines), and transportation...
Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported coastal wetlands along the U.S. shore of Saginaw Bay. The resulting analysis supported planning efforts to identify, prioritize, and track wetland restoration opportunity and investment in the region. To accomplish this, publicly available data, criteria derived from the regional managers and local stakeholders, and geospatial analysis were used to form an ecological model for spatial prioritization.
thumbnail
As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is expanding National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability of coastal wetlands to various factors and to evaluate their ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), New Jersey, was selected as a pilot study area. As part of this data synthesis effort, hydrodynamic and sediment transport...
thumbnail
This dataset is the output of a python script/ArcGIS model that identifes dikes as having a difference in elevation above a certain threshold. If the elevation difference was below a certain threshold the area was not considered a dike; however, if the difference in elevation between two points was significantly high then the area was marked as a dike. Areas continuous with eachother were considered part of the same dike. Post processing occured. Users examined the data output, comparing the proposed dike locations to aerial imagery, flowline data, and the DEM. Dikes that appeared to be false positives were deleted from the data set.
thumbnail
Natural and anthropogenic contaminants, pathogens, and viruses are found in soils and sediments throughout the United States. Enhanced dispersion and concentration of these environmental health stressors in coastal regions can result from sea level rise and storm-derived disturbances. The combination of existing environmental health stressors and those mobilized by natural or anthropogenic disasters could adversely impact the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems. This dataset displays the exposure potential to environmental health stressors in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Exposure...
thumbnail
This dataset contains data supporting the paper: DeCrappeo, N.M., DeLorenze, E.J., Giguere, A.T., Pyke, D.A., and Bottomley, P.J. Fungal and bacterial contributions to nitrogen cycling in cheatgrass-invaded and uninvaded native sagebrush soils of the western USA (accepted at the journal Plant and Soil). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative contributions of soil bacteria and fungi to inorganic nitrogen (N) cycling in sagebrush and cheatgrass-invaded soils using a 15N isotope dilution experiment. Soils were collected from sagebrush and cheatgrass rhizospheres at six paired sites in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon. In order to partition the contribution of each microbial group to N cycling, soils...
thumbnail
This dataset is the output of a python script/ArcGIS model that identifes dikes as having a difference in elevation above a certain threshold. If the elevation difference was below a certain threshold the area was not considered a dike; however, if the difference in elevation between two points was significantly high then the area was marked as a dike. Areas continuous with eachother were considered part of the same dike. Post processing occured. Users examined the data output, comparing the proposed dike locations to aerial imagery, flowline data, and the DEM. Dikes that appeared to be false positives were deleted from the data set.
thumbnail
The Terrestrial Development Index (TDI) quantifies levels of development (urban, agriculture, energy and mineral extraction and transmission, and transportation). TDI scores represent the total percentage of the development footprint within a 2.5 kilometer (km) radius circular moving window. The TDI scores range from 0-100%. The TDI scores between 0-1% represent areas with few roads or a very low density of oil and gas wells. The TDI scores between 1-3% often include low densities of oil and gas wells and roads, whereas development index scores above 3% represent moderate to high levels of development, including relatively large oil and gas fields, surface mines, agricultural fields, centers of urban development,...
thumbnail
Natural and anthropogenic contaminants, pathogens, and viruses are found in soils and sediments throughout the United States. Enhanced dispersion and concentration of these environmental health stressors in coastal regions can result from sea level rise and storm-derived disturbances. The combination of existing environmental health stressors and those mobilized by natural or anthropogenic disasters could adversely impact the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems. This dataset displays the exposure potential to environmental health stressors in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Exposure...
thumbnail
Estuary geomorphic units delineated at a scale of 1:1500 using a combination of (a) 28 August 2014 0.15 meter resolution NPS Elwha PlaneCam aerial imagery; and (b) elevation-colored and hillshaded digital elevation models from USGS backpack/jetski topobathy surveys (5-8 September 2014) for areas < MHHW and aerial lidar surveys (7 November 2014) supplemented with NPS Elwha PlaneCam SfM photogrammetry data (30 September 2014) for elevations > MHHW.
thumbnail
Introduction Evaluating the environmental impacts of climate change on water resources and biological components of the landscape is an integral part of hydrologic and ecological investigations, and the resultant land and resource management in the twenty-first century. Impacts of both climate and simulated hydrologic parameters on ecological processes are relevant at scales that reflect the heterogeneity and complexity of landscapes. At present, simulations of climate change available from global climate models [GCMs] require downscaling for hydrologic or ecological applications. Methods Using statistically downscaled future climate projections developed using constructed analogues, a methodology was developed...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecological Processes
thumbnail
Estuary geomorphic units delineated at a scale of 1:1500 using a combination of (a) 11 September 2009 1 meter resolution NAIP aerial imagery; and (b) elevation-colored and hillshaded digital elevation models from USGS backpack/jetski topobathy surveys (17 September 2009) for areas < MHHW and aerial lidar surveys (4-6 April 2009) for elevations > MHHW.
thumbnail
Landscape intactness has been defined as a quantifiable estimate of naturalness measured on a gradient of anthropogenic influence. We developed a multiscale index of landscape intactness for the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) landscape approach, which requires multiple scales of information to quantify the cumulative effects of land use. The multiscale index of landscape intactness represents a gradient of anthropogenic influence as represented by development levels at two analysis scales. To create the index, we first mapped the surface disturbance footprint of development, for the western U.S., by compiling and combining spatial data for urban development, agriculture, energy and minerals, and transportation...
thumbnail
Estuary geomorphic units delineated at a scale of 1:1500 using a combination of (a) 26 August 2013 0.15 meter resolution NPS Elwha PlaneCam aerial imagery; and (b) elevation-colored and hillshaded digital elevation models from USGS backpack/jetski topobathy surveys (16 September 2013) for areas < MHHW and aerial lidar surveys (17 October 2012) supplemented with NPS Elwha PlaneCam SfM photogrammetry data (19 September 2013) for elevations > MHHW.
thumbnail
Monitoring shoreline change is of interest in many coastal areas because it enables quantification of land loss over time. Evolution of shoreline position is determined by the balance between erosion and accretion along the coast. In the case of salt marshes, erosion along the water boundary causes a loss of ecosystem services, such as habitat provision, carbon storage, and wave attenuation. In terms of vulnerability, higher shoreline erosion rates indicate higher vulnerability. This dataset displays shoreline change rates at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Shoreline change rates are based on...
thumbnail
This folder includes a data layer that defines the conceptual marsh units in the Plum Island Estuary and Parker River salt marsh complex and additional data layers to facilitate a multi-criteria assessment of state of the coastal salt marshes. Through scientific efforts initiated with the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey has been expanding national assessment of coastal change hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands, including the Plum Island Estuary and Parker River salt marsh complex, with the intent of providing Federal, State, and local managers with tools to estimate the vulnerability and ecosystem service potential of these wetlands. For this purpose, the response and resilience...


map background search result map search result map A Multiscale Index of Landscape Intactness for the Western United States Surface Disturbance Footprint from Development for the Western United States Terrestrial Development Index for the Western United States: 2.5-kilometer moving window Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Dikes Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Dikes Exposure potential of saltmarsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors (polygon shapefile) Exposure potential of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors Nitrogen cycling rates from sagebrush and cheatgrass-invaded soils in the Northern Great Basin (2008) Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2009 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2013 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2014 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Vegetation habitat units derived from 2009 aerial imagery and field data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Vegetation habitat units derived from 2013 aerial imagery and field data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Vegetation habitat units derived from 2014 aerial imagery and field data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Change in salinity exposure of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Shoreline change rates in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Coastal wetlands of Plum Island Estuary and Parker River, Massachusetts Vegetation habitat units derived from 2013 aerial imagery and field data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Vegetation habitat units derived from 2014 aerial imagery and field data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Vegetation habitat units derived from 2009 aerial imagery and field data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2009 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2013 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2014 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington Shoreline change rates in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey Change in salinity exposure of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey during Hurricane Sandy Exposure potential of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors Exposure potential of saltmarsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors (polygon shapefile) Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Dikes Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Dikes Nitrogen cycling rates from sagebrush and cheatgrass-invaded soils in the Northern Great Basin (2008) A Multiscale Index of Landscape Intactness for the Western United States Surface Disturbance Footprint from Development for the Western United States Terrestrial Development Index for the Western United States: 2.5-kilometer moving window