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We assessed the resilience of wetlands to sea-level rise along a transitional gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW) to oligohaline marsh by measuring processes controlling wetland elevation. We identified fundamental differences in how resilience is maintained across wetland community types, which have important implications for management activities that aim to restore or conserve resilient systems.
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This data release includes monitoring data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Humboldt Bay Water Quality and Salt Marsh Monitoring Project. The datasets include continuous water levels collected at a 6-minute timestep collected in two study marshes (Mad River and Hookton). Surface deposition, elevation changes and carbon storage (in marsh edge environments) measured in five USGS study marshes (Mad River, Manila, Jacoby, White and Hookton). The monitoring data presented in this data release represent fundamental datasets needed to manage blue carbon stocks, assess marsh vulnerability, inform SLR adaptation planning, and build coastal resiliency to climate change in Humboldt Bay, CA Additional documentaton...
Rising sea levels threaten the sustainability of coastal wetlands around the globe, thus understanding how increased inundation alters the elevation change mechanisms in these systems is increasingly important. Typically, the ability of coastal marshes to maintain their position in the intertidal zone depends on the accumulation of both organic and inorganic materials, so one, if not both, of these processes must increase to keep pace with rising seas, assuming all else constant. To determine the importance of vegetation in these processes, we measured elevation change and surface accretion over a 4-year period in recently subsided, unvegetated marshes, resulting from drought-induced marsh dieback, in paired planted...
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To avoid submergence during sea-level rise, coastal wetlands build soil surfaces vertically through accumulation of inorganic sediment and organic matter. At climatic boundaries where mangroves are expanding and replacing salt marsh, wetland capacity to respond to sea-level rise may change. To compare how well mangroves and salt marshes accommodate sea-level rise, we conducted a manipulative field experiment in a subtropical plant community in the rapidly subsiding Mississippi River Delta. Experimental plots were established in spatially equivalent positions along creek banks in monospecific stands of Spartina alterniflora (smooth cordgrass) or Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) and in mixed stands containing...


    map background search result map search result map Elevation change along a coastal wetland landscape gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland to oligohaline marsh in the Southeastern U.S.A. (2009-2014) data Will fluctuations in salt marsh - mangrove dominance alter vulnerability of a subtropical wetland to sea-level rise? Salt marsh monitoring during water years 2013 to 2019, Humboldt Bay, CA – water levels, surface deposition, elevation change, and carbon storage Salt marsh monitoring during water years 2013 to 2019, Humboldt Bay, CA – water levels, surface deposition, elevation change, and carbon storage Will fluctuations in salt marsh - mangrove dominance alter vulnerability of a subtropical wetland to sea-level rise? Elevation change along a coastal wetland landscape gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland to oligohaline marsh in the Southeastern U.S.A. (2009-2014) data