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Addressing knowledge gaps to better protect unique landforms and their wealth of hidden biodiversity.
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Water availability, distribution, quality and quantity are critical habitat elements for fish and other water-dependent species. Furthermore, the availability of water is also a pre-requisite for a number of human activities. The density of weather and hydrology observation sites on the North Slope is orders of magnitude less than in other parts of the U.S., making it difficult to document hydrologic trends and develop accurate predictive models where water is a key input. The information that does exist is scattered among many entities, and varies in format. This multi-year data rescue effort project brings together these scarce and scattered hydrology data sets, including high-priority datasets held by the Bureau...
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The Integrated Ecosystem Model is designed to help resource managers understand the nature and expected rate of landscape change. Maps and other products generated by the IEM will illustrate how arctic and boreal landscapes are expected to alter due to climate-driven changes to vegetation, disturbance, hydrology, and permafrost. The products will also provide resource managers with an understanding of the uncertainty in the expected outcomes.
Open Woodlands Used generally to describe low density forests, open woodland ecosystems contain widely spaced trees whose crowns do not touch, causing for an open canopy, insignificant midstory canopy layer, sparse understory and where groundcover is the most obvious feature of the landscape dominated by diverseflora (grasses, forbes, sedges). Open Woodlands provide habitat for a diverse mix of wildlife species, several of which are of conservation concern, such as Red Headed Woodpecker, Prairie Warbler, Kentucky Warbler, Northern Bobwhite and Eastern Red Bat. Predicted climate change will largely impact changes in temperature and moisture availability in open woodlands systems, likely having a cascading effect...
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A high spatial resolution storm surge model was developed for the YK Delta area to assess biological impacts of storm surges under current and future climates. Storm surges are expected to be more frequent and more severe in the YK Delta area due to climate change and sea level rise. The biological impacts in the YK Delta due to the changed storm surges could be extreme.The model was assessed with respect to measured water level data at the coast and, where available, spatial extent of inundation, for 6 storms from the period 1992 to 2011. In total, inundation projections from 9 historical storms (5 from the assessment + 4 others) were developed. For each storm, an spatial inundation index (time-integral of water...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AREAS, ARCHAEOLOGICAL AREAS, Academics & scientific researchers, COASTAL AREAS, COASTAL AREAS, All tags...
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Researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) willinvestigate glacier-climate interactions within the ArcticNational Wildlife Refuge, including impacts of glacier change onthe downstream aquatic ecosystems. This work builds upon theonly long-term monitoring program of glaciers in Arctic Alaska.
Developing consistent region-wide information to ensure enough water for people and wildlife.
Forested Stream and/or Seepage Forested stream environments are typically found in the buffer zones between forested land and stream banks, often known as riparian zones. Stream headwaters and seepage areas occur where ground water percolates to the surface through muck, mossy rock, and nettles. It can also be found under rocks, among gravel, or cobble where water has begun to percolate in areas near open water. Breeding grounds are commonly found beneath mosses growing on rocks, on logs, or soil surfaces in these types of seepage areas.Predicted climate change will largely impact changes in temperature and moisture availability in forested streamand/or seepage systems, likely having a cascading effect on a species...
Research from the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the U.S. Forest Service is integrating society’s value of ecosystems with future risks, to inform natural resource planning and management across the Appalachians and help decision makers, industry and the public adopt policies that protect and invest in these resources.
One of the major challenges in understanding changes in coastal processes in western Alaska is the lack of measured ocean data in the region. ​This project leveraged existing human resources, and physical and computational infrastructure to collect and disseminate oceanographic observations in the Bering Sea. From instrument restoration, transport and deployment, through data streaming, recovery and dissemination, this project considered the end to end supports necessary to gather, promote, and serve oceanographic data along Alaska’s Western coast. Real‐time sea‐state conditions were transmitted via both high and low bandwidth sites, directly benefited emergency managers and local communities, particularly in dealing...
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The Arctic LCC and partners are supporting stream gages infive different river systems. The rivers being monitored fall intothree broad categories: glacial streams originating in the BrooksRange (Hulahula river), streams with only minor glacial input(Kuparuk, Canning & Tamayariak rivers), and non-glacialstreams that are contained entirely within the Arctic CoastalPlain, such as the Putuligayuk River
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Researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) willdevelop a model that examines the relationship betweenmeasured steam flow and surface water connectivity betweensummer feeding and overwintering habitats for fish on theNorth Slope.
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The Arctic LCC and partners are supporting stream gages infive different river systems. The rivers being monitored fall intothree broad categories: glacial streams originating in the BrooksRange (Hulahula river), streams with only minor glacial input(Kuparuk, Canning & Tamayariak rivers), and non-glacialstreams that are contained entirely within the Arctic CoastalPlain, such as the Putuligayuk River
The multi-LCC Mississippi River Basin/Gulf Hypoxia Initiative is a joint effort to find the nexus of water quality, wildlife, and people in the Mississippi River Basin. Integrating hundreds of data layers into a coherent spatial analysis tool, the Precision Conservation Blueprint v1.0 will provide a significant targeting and planning tool for individuals and organizations across the basin to identify opportunity areas for the implementation of specific conservation practices that have maximum multiple benefits for wildlife, water quality (gulf hypoxia), and people and agricultural productivity.Practice Fact Sheets identify a dozen or more high impact conservation actions that have potential for multi-sector benefits...
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The Putuligayuk catchment is wholly contained within the coastal plain and is one of the few rivers on the North Slope with a long-term record of water discharge. These long-term datasets are invaluable to modeling efforts that will provide insight on stream flows under scenarios of changing climate.


map background search result map search result map Summary handout - Factsheet IEM-CSC Factsheet with Supplement, 2015 HydroClimate Data Rescue Factsheet Streamgages Factsheet Climate and Fish Migration Factsheet Streamgages Factsheet Streamgages Factsheet Glaciers and Rivers in ArcticNWR Factsheet Climate and Fish Migration Factsheet Streamgages Factsheet Glaciers and Rivers in ArcticNWR Factsheet Streamgages Factsheet Summary handout - Factsheet Streamgages Factsheet HydroClimate Data Rescue Factsheet IEM-CSC Factsheet with Supplement, 2015