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Executive Summary: Portions of broad-scale ecoregions of the Great Plains, and Southern Semiarid Highlands were generally projected as mostly suitable for large fires of low severity within 31 years. Under a 2070 future climate scenario of high CO2 emission (HadGEM2-ES RCP8.5) a significant increase in suitability for large low severity wildfires was seen in Wyoming and Montana, which was accompanied by a decrease in suitability for the Madrean Archipelago and portions of central and west Texas. Broad scale niche model for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under current climate was centered within the known breeding range mostly along riparian areas. Under a 2070 future climate scenario of high CO2 emission (HadGEM2-ES...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
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In regulated rivers of the southwest, reduced flooding and the invasion of tamarisk contributes to accumulation of greater fuel loads and increased riparian fire frequency. As a result, some desert riparian areas, historically considered barriers to wildfire, have been converted into pathways for wildfire spread. Fire-smart management strategies are needed to protect sensitive riparian species and reduce fire risk from increased fire frequency due to interactions of climate change, tamarisk invasion, and tamarisk beetle activity. Fire niche simulations will be used to project impacts of fire frequency and climate change, which can be used to highlight areas of the Desert LCC where Southwestern Willow Flycatcher,...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
Wildland fire is a key ecosystem process that shapes the landscape of Western United States. Changes in fire regimes can therefore have profound impact on ecosystem functions and services, including carbon cycling, habitat conditions, and biodiversity. This study examined fire regime changes in the Northern Rocky Mountain region using a landscape succession model (LANDSUMv4). The objective is to report a new method to develop fire regime condition class (FRCC) maps by comparing historical reference conditions of fire regimes – simulated using historical fire record and the LANDSUMv4 model – with current fire regimes developed using 27 years remote sensing fire product and LANDSUMv4. Results of this study indicate...
Stands of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) rank among the most biologically diverse plant communities across the intermountain region of western North America. Marked declines of aspen have occurred in recent decades, likely due to a combination of effects from changes in fire regimes, herbivory, climate (e.g. drought), and interspecific competition with conifer species. However, it is poorly understood how the effects of these factors are manifested at a landscape scale over decadal time periods. Analysis of field data combined with topographic information collected across the 500,000 ha Owyhee Plateau in southwestern Idaho revealed that aspen in the area occur in three different biophysical settings; First,...
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Arid ecosystems are often vulnerable to transformation to invasive-dominated states following fire, but data on persistence of these states are sparse. The grass/fire cycle is a feedback process between invasive annual grasses and fire frequency that often leads to the formation of alternative vegetation states dominated by the invasive grasses. However, other components of fire regimes, such as burn severity, also have the potential to produce long-term vegetation transformations. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of both fire frequency and burn severity on the transformation of woody-dominated communities to communities dominated by invasive grasses in major elevation zones of the Mojave Desert of western...
The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) MC2 was run over the conterminous USA at 30 arc sec (~800 m) to simulate the impacts of nine climate futures generated by 3GCMs (CSIRO, MIROC and CGCM3) using 3 emission scenarios (A2, A1B and B1) in the context of the LandCarbon national carbon sequestration assessment. It first simulated potential vegetation dynamics from coast to coast assuming no human impacts and naturally occurring wildfires. A moderate effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on water use efficiency and growth enhanced carbon sequestration but did not greatly influence woody encroachment. The wildfires maintained prairie-forest ecotones in the Great Plains. With simulated fire suppression, the number...


    map background search result map search result map Fire-smart Southwestern Riparian Landscape Management and Restoration of Native Biodiversity in View of Species of Conservation Concern and the Impacts of Tamarisk Beetles Cover of Woody and Herbaceous Functional Groups in Burned and Unburned Plots, Mojave Desert, 2009-2013 Final Report: Fire-smart southwestern riparian landscape management and restoration of native biodiversity in view of species of conservation concern and the impacts of tamarisk beetles Cover of Woody and Herbaceous Functional Groups in Burned and Unburned Plots, Mojave Desert, 2009-2013 Fire-smart Southwestern Riparian Landscape Management and Restoration of Native Biodiversity in View of Species of Conservation Concern and the Impacts of Tamarisk Beetles Final Report: Fire-smart southwestern riparian landscape management and restoration of native biodiversity in view of species of conservation concern and the impacts of tamarisk beetles