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Riparian invasive species distribution within the DRECP study area; created for use in terrestrial intactness modeling. This dataset is binary. A cell value of 1 indicates the presence of one or more invasive riparian species at that location. A cell value of 0 indicates the absence of riparian invasives at that location. This dataset was created by combining the following classes from LANDFIRE EVT V1.1, NatureServe Landcover, Jarnevich, et al., and Tamarisk 1965 line. LANDFIRE EVT V1.1 2180: Introduced Riparian Vegetation NatureServe Landcover 8480: Introduced Riparian Vegetation Jarnevich, et al (modeled Tamarisk) Thresholded at 0.6 Tamarisk 1965 line (http://www.tamariskmap.org) All line features...
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This map was created to help assess impacts on nonindigenous aquatic species distributions due to flooding associated with Hurricane Maria. Storm surge and flood events can assist expansion and distribution of nonindigenous aquatic species through the connection of adjacent watersheds, backflow of water upstream of impoundments, increased downstream flow, and creation of freshwater bridges along coastal regions. This map will help natural resource managers determine potential new locations for individual species, or to develop a watch list of potential new species within a watershed. These data include a subset of data from the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, that fall within the general area of the 2017...
Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) has widely invaded the Great Basin, U.S.A. The sporadic natural phenomenon of complete stand failure (‘die- off’) of this invader may present opportunities to restore native plants. A recent die-off in Nevada was precision-planted with seeds of the native grasses Poa secunda (Sandberg bluegrass) and Elymus elymoides (bottlebrush squirreltail), of both local and nonlocal origin, to ask: 1) Can native species be restored in recent B. tectorum die-offs? And 2) Do local and nonlocal seeds differ in performance? Additionally, we asked how litter removal and water addition affected responses. Although emergence and growth of native seeds was lower in die-off than control plots early in year...
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This map was created to help assess impacts on nonindigenous aquatic species distributions due to flooding associated with Hurricane Irma. Storm surge and flood events can assist expansion and distribution of nonindigenous aquatic species through the connection of adjacent watersheds, backflow of water upstream of impoundments, increased downstream flow, and creation of freshwater bridges along coastal regions. This map will help natural resource managers determine potential new locations for individual species, or to develop a watch list of potential new species within a watershed. These data include a subset of data from the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, that fall within the general area of the 2017...
The phenomenon of cheatgrass die-off is a common and naturally- occurring stand failure that can eliminate the presence of this annual grass for a year or more, affecting tens to hundreds of thousands of acres in some years. We designed a study to determine if the temporary lack of cheatgrass caused by die-offs is a restoration opportunity. We seeded native perennial species at three die-offs in the Winnemucca, Nevada area. Native grass establishment in die-offs was almost three times higher in the first season at all sites, relative to adjacent areas without die-off. In the second season, establishment was five times higher in the die-off at two sites, and plants were notably larger in the die-off at the third...
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The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (NAS) information resource is an established central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The NAS website provides scientific reports, online/real-time queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, fact sheets, and general information.
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Over the past century, Hawaiˈi has experienced a pronounced decline in precipitation and stream flow and a number of severe droughts. These changes can have wide-reaching implications, affecting the water supply, native vegetation and wildlife, wildfire patterns, and the spread of invasive species. Several climate-related factors are influencing Hawaiˈi’s landscapes and contributing to these changes. These include climate change, climate variability, and drought (referred to collectively as CCVD). Climate variability describes how the climate fluctuates on a yearly basis around average values, while climate change describes patterns of long-term continuous change in the average. While it is understood that CCVD...
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This feature class contains known invasive plant species. This dataset represents the inventory mapping results of invasive plant species for the San Diego County. SANDAG's contractor, AECOM, completed an inventory mapping of invasive plant species. SANDAG will keep updating the invasive species layer when the new information is available.Â
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The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (NAS) information resource is an established central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The NAS website provides scientific reports, online/real-time queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, fact sheets, and general information.
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FY2014The project team surveyed land managers working on invasive weeds in the west. These surveys provided information for the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife (WAFWA) Wildfire and Invasive Species Initiative Working Group. The survey results and other findings were used to inform a report titled Invasive Plant Management and Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation,published last spring.
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Mitigation of ecological damage caused by rangeland wildfires has historically been an issue restricted to the western United States. It has focused on conservation of ecosystem function through reducing soil erosion and spread of invasive plants. Effectiveness of mitigation treatments has been debated recently. We searched for literature on postfire seeding of rangelands worldwide. Literature databases searched included SCOPUS, Dissertation Abstracts, Forest Science, Tree search, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and science.gov. Search terms within publications included fire or wildfire in combination with seeding, rehabilitation, restoration, revegetation, stabilization, chaining, disking, drilling, invasives,...
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The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (NAS) information resource is an established central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The NAS website provides scientific reports, online/real-time queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, fact sheets, and general information.
The exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) dominates vast acreages of rangeland in the western USA, leading to increased fire frequency and ecosystem degradation that is often irreversible. Episodic regeneration failure (“die-off”) has been observed in cheatgrass monocultures and can have negative ecosystem consequences, but can also provide an opportunity for restoration of native species and ecological function within the imperiled sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Proximate causes of cheatgrass die-off are uncertain, although several taxa of fungal soil pathogens have been implicated. Die-off occurrence is stochastic and can occur in remote areas. Thus, developing remote sensing indicators that are repeatable...
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Invasive species distribution within the DRECP study area as represented in the LANDFIRE Succession Classes dataset; created for use in terrestrial intactness modeling. This dataset is binary. A cell value of 1 indicates the presence of one or more invasive species at that location. A value of 0 indicates the absence of invasives at that location. This dataset was created by extracting cell values of 7 (Uncharacteristic Exotic Vegetation) from the LANDFIRE Succession Classes dataset. A vegetation mask was also applied in order to ensure that data was only generated in areas outside the extent of impervious surfaces (based on NLCD Impervious Surfaces data) and within the extent of LANDFIRE EVT V1.1 vegetation...
Tags: drecp, invasives
This presentation addressed issues confronting preservation and restoration of big sagebrush, focusing on climate, wildfire, and invasives. Preliminary and published insights on climate responses of sagebrush and implications for vulnerability assessments and post-fire restoration were described. Responses of big sagebrush and competitors such as cheatgrass to climate manipulations are providing important insight on the ways in which sagebrush may resist or respond to warming or shifts in precipitation. Big sagebrush is a remarkably diverse species, and preliminary findings from common-garden studies are suggesting how the diversity is important for its climate responses and for selection of appropriate seed sources....
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Invasive species distribution within the DRECP study area; created for use in terrestrial intactness modeling. This dataset is binary. A cell value of 1 indicates the presence of one or more invasive species at that location. A value of 0 indicates the absence of invasives at that location. This dataset was created by combining the following composite datasets: Upland invasives, riparian invasives, and uncharacteristic exotic vegetation (LANDFIRE succession class 7). The following is a list of the datasets that were used in created the composites listed above: LANDFIRE EVT V1.1 2180: Introduced Riparian Vegetation 2181: Introduced Upland Vegetation-Annual Grassland 2182: Introduced Upland Vegetation-Perennial...
Tags: drecp, invasives
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Post-fire rehabilitation seeding in the U.S. Intermountain West, primarily conducted by the Bureau of Land Management, is designed to reduce the risk of erosion and weed invasion while increasing desirable plant cover. Seeding effectiveness is typically monitored for three years following treatment, after which a closeout report is prepared. We evaluated 220 third-year closeout reports describing 214 aerial and 113 drill seedings implemented after wildfires from 2001 through 2006. Each treatment was assigned a qualitative success rating of good, fair, poor, or failure based on information in the reports. Seeding success varied by both treatment (aerial or drill) and year. Aerial seedings were rated 13.6% good, 18.3%...
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FY2017The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan places a high priority on assessing control measures for invasive annual grasses, which provide fuel for rangeland fire and impede restoration of desirable perennials. Weed-suppressive strains of the bacterium Psuedomonas fluoresens (P.f.) are an emerging but yet untested tool for selectively reducing these annual grasses. P.f. may suppress annuals for approximately 2-5 years, bridging the short-term action of herbicides and long-term resistance provided as native bunchgrasses recover. In 2015-2016, the USGS responded to a request from the Idaho sage grouse action group to establish a series of field-based experiments to assess the efficacy...
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This map was created to help assess impacts on nonindigenous aquatic species distributions due to flooding associated with Hurricane Nate. Storm surge and flood events can assist expansion and distribution of nonindigenous aquatic species through the connection of adjacent watersheds, backflow of water upstream of impoundments, increased downstream flow, and creation of freshwater bridges along coastal regions. This map will help natural resource managers determine potential new locations for individual species, or to develop a watch list of potential new species within a watershed. These data include a subset of data from the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, that fall within the general area of the 2017...


map background search result map search result map Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database Asian Tiger Shrimp 2012 Invasive Plant Species, San Diego County Invasive Species Composite (Upland, Riparian, Uncharacteristic Exotic Vegetation), DRECP Uncharacteristic Exotic Vegetation (LANDFIRE Succession Classes, Class 7), DRECP Riparian Invasive Species (LANDFIRE EVT V1.1, NatureServe Landcover, Jarnevich, Tamarisk 1965 line), DRECP Data Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database Invasive Species Management Contributions to Greater Sage-grouse Conservation West-wide. Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions across the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative region Evaluation of Weed-Suppressive Bacteria for Control of Exotic Annual Grasses Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Nate Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Maria Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Irma Evaluation of Weed-Suppressive Bacteria for Control of Exotic Annual Grasses 2012 Invasive Plant Species, San Diego County Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Maria Invasive Species Management Contributions to Greater Sage-grouse Conservation West-wide. Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Nate Invasive Species Composite (Upland, Riparian, Uncharacteristic Exotic Vegetation), DRECP Uncharacteristic Exotic Vegetation (LANDFIRE Succession Classes, Class 7), DRECP Riparian Invasive Species (LANDFIRE EVT V1.1, NatureServe Landcover, Jarnevich, Tamarisk 1965 line), DRECP Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Irma Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions across the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative region Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database Asian Tiger Shrimp Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database