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This inventory was originally created by the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, El Salvador (2001) describing the landslides triggered by the M 7.7 San Miguel, El Salvador earthquake that occurred on 13 January 2001 at 17:33:32 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory also could be associated with other earthquakes such as aftershocks or triggered events. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory data and...
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This inventory was originally created by Xu and others (2014) describing the landslides triggered by the M 5.9 Gansu, China earthquake, also known as the Minxian - Zhangxian earthquake, that occurred on 21 July 2013 at 23:45:56 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory also could be associated with other earthquakes such as aftershocks or triggered events. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory data and associated metadata...
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Municipal crews attempt to clear streets and drainage systems of water, mud and debris between record-breaking rains in late July/early August 2006. El Paso County was declared a Federal Disaster Area following rain and thunderstorms which caused mud slides. (Photograph by Robert J. Alvey/FEMA)
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Rockfalls strongly influence the evolution of steep rocky landscapes and represent a significant hazard in mountainous areas. Defining the most probable future rockfall source areas is of primary importance for both geomorphological investigations and hazard assessment. Thus, a need exists to understand which areas of a steep cliff are more likely to be affected by a rockfall. An important analytical gap exists between regional rockfall susceptibility studies and block-specific geomechanical calculations. Here we present methods for quantifying rockfall susceptibility at the cliff scale, which is suitable for sub-regional hazard assessment (hundreds to thousands of square meters). Our methods use three-dimensional...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Landslides
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Los Angeles County, California, landslides. Pacific Palisades. Start of cleanup of February 3, 1956, landslide at the west end of Via de las Olas. View is northwest. February 4, 1956.
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Kaiparowits Coal Basin, Utah. Landslide debris just north of Fifty-Mile Point looking west near the south end of Fifty-Mile Mountain. Landslide and debris- flow material has moved toward the viewer from near the base of the highest cliffs onto the intermediate bench of Dakota Sandstone as a sheet slide and locally has flowed down over Morrison-Entrada cliffs as a lobate debris slide. Boulders in debris slide are as large as 40 feet. Debris flow formed at lower end. 1976. Portion of figure 9, U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1601.
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San Fernando Earthquake, February 9, 1971, 6:01am PST. (Roll 10, Frame 4). Oblique air view northeast into Pacoima Canyon, of housing development northeast of Shinsaw Ave., and Hubbard Street. (Far northeast corner of Sylmar Area). Many homes in this area were condemned due to damage during the quake. Hazy portion of picture is due to dust clouds produced by landslides which continue for several days after quake. Feb 11, 1971.
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San Francisco, California, Earthquake April 18, 1906. Cape Fortunes (False Cape) landslide, one of the largest landslides triggered by the 1906 shock. View toward toe showing extension of toe into Pacific Ocean in background. Similar photograph previously published by Lawson and others (1908, pl. 127B) with caption "Earth-slump at Cape Fortunas, Humboldt County." Humboldt County, California. 1906. Published as figure 67-B in U. S. Geological Survey. Professional paper 993. 1978. Photograph by A.S. Eakle, courtesy of The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.
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Scarp at base of Wasatch Range opposite Honeyville. It is thought that the table on which part of the town stands may be a landslide corresponding to this scarp. Box Elder County, Utah.n.d. Published as plate 11-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional paper 153. 1928. See Woolley, Photo No. wrr00325. (now-then28).
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This cover contains the outlines of recent landslides formed prior to Hurricane Mitch in October - November 1998. Jeffrey Coe and Robert Bucknam mapped the landslides. Most landslides were mapped using 1:40,000-scale aerial photographs and a Kern PG-2 photogrammetric plotter at 4X and 8X magnifications. The photographs were scaled and oriented to the topographic base map using prominent topographic landmarks and plotted on a transparent polyester overlay registered to the topographic base maps at scales of 1:50,000 or 1:25,000. In areas where landslides were very sparse, the aerial photographs were scanned with a mirror stereoscope at 4X magnification, and landslide locations were transferred to base maps by inspection....
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Talus slopes on cliffs, left by Simcoe Landslide. Twenty miles southeast of North Yakima, Washington. Yakima County, Washington. 1892. Plate 4 in US Geological Survey Bulletin 108. 1893.
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California earthquake. Landslides 2 1/2 miles northwest of Bolinas Lagoon, looking east-northeast. Earthquake cracks made in April, 1906, caught water from rains the following winter. The saturated earth flowed as liquid mud. Marin County, California. March 29, 1907. (Panorama with photo no. 3049)
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Kaoiki, Hawaii, Earthquake November 16, 1983. Details of failure of Waldron Ledge landslide. View downward from the road of the jumbled mass of rock resulting from disintegration of the slide block; the mass did not travel far from the base of the cliff. Photo by J.M. Buchanan-Banks. 1983. Figure 44.24- U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 1350.
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Alaska Earthquake March 27, 1964. Landslide effects in Turnagain Heights in Anchorage. 1964.
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Landslide near Uintah, Weber County, Utah.n.d. (Panorama with photo no. 3484). Published as plate 17-A in U.S. Geologocal Survey. Professional paper 153. 1928. See Woolley, Photo No. wrr00330. (now-then27).


map background search result map search result map Landslide(?) damage to lower Van Norman Dam. San Fernando, California, Earthquake February 1971. 1971. Landslide and other damage at lower Van Norman Dam. San Fernando, California, Earthquake February 1971. 1971. Older landslides in Tactic quadrangle, Guatemala El Paso Landslide. El Paso County, Texas. 2006. Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, El Salvador (2001) Xu and others (2014) Landslide(?) damage to lower Van Norman Dam. San Fernando, California, Earthquake February 1971. 1971. Landslide and other damage at lower Van Norman Dam. San Fernando, California, Earthquake February 1971. 1971. Xu and others (2014) Older landslides in Tactic quadrangle, Guatemala Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, El Salvador (2001) El Paso Landslide. El Paso County, Texas. 2006.