Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: model (X)

637 results (11ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
This dataset represents the average amount of Growing Degree Days (GDD) per year within each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Growing degree days (referenced to 0oC) (unit = deg C days) were determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries. They were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW 09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1 model...
thumbnail
Ken Ferschweiler (CBI) used climate data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, Oregon State University) at 4kmx4km spatial grain across the conterminous USA to generate a climatology or baseline. He then created future climate change scenarios using statistical downscaling and created anomalies from the Hadley CM3 General Circulation Model (GCM) run through the A2 emission scenario (SRES - special report on emission scenarios published in 2000). To run the MAPSS model (Neilson 1995), average monthly precipitation values were calculated for the period 2045-2060. This dataset shows the standard deviation of the annual precipitation for that period.
thumbnail
This dataset corresponds to statistically downscaled and reprojected GCM-driven RegCM3 (regional climate model) future projections. Data were bias corrected using the delta/anomaly method whereby the difference between future and historical projections from RegCM3 were calculated, reprojected and downscaled using linear interpolation to then modify a PRISM model generated historical baseline (1968-1999).
thumbnail
This dataset represents the difference between future and historic maximum temperatures under the CSIRO A2 future climate scenario.
thumbnail
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) was modeled to produce fourteen simulations of streamflow for demonstration of enhancements to the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS); seven simulations without water use effects and seven simulations with water use effects. The seven simulations without water use were for 1) the whole ACFB basin (1982-2012), 2) the Chestatee River sub-basin (1982-2012), 3) the Chipola River sub-basin (1982-2012), 4) the Ichawaynochaway Creek sub-basin (1982-2012), 5) the Potato Creek sub-basin (1942-2012), 6) the Spring Creek sub-basin (1952-2012), and 7) the upper Chattahoochee River sub-basin (1982-2012). The seven simulations with water use effects were for the...
thumbnail
The beaches of the Hawaiian Islands attract nearly 9 million visitors each year, who inject around $15.6 billion into the state’s economy and support almost 200,000 jobs. Beyond their economic importance, Hawaiian beaches are also culturally and ecologically valuable. However, climate change driven sea-level rise is causing many beaches to disappear, endangering property, infrastructure, and critical habitats. The goal of this project was to develop a method for forecasting erosion-vulnerable beach areas that could be used in coastal management planning. Researchers focused on the island of Kauaʻi, modeling beach response to rising sea level over the next century and producing maps that provide information about...
thumbnail
Phase 1 & 2 (2010, 2012): This project developed a sampling design and monitoring protocol for wintering shorebirds in the Central Valley and in the San Francisco Bay Estuary and develop an LCC-specific online shorebird monitoring portal publicly available at the California Avian Data Center. The three objectives in Phase II of this project are: 1) Complete the shorebird monitoring plan for the CA LCC by developing a sampling design and monitoring protocol for wintering shorebirds in coastal southern California and northern Mexico. 2) Develop models to evaluate the influence of habitat factors from multiple spatial scales on shorebird use of San Francisco Bay and managed wetlands in the Sacramento Valley, as a model...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Publication, pacific flyway, Datasets/Database, invertebrates, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
Tidal marsh habitat is at high risk of severe loss and degradation as a result of human uses, sea-level rise, changes in salinity, and more frequent and extreme storms projected by climate models. Availability of habitat is a prerequisite for long-term viability of marsh bird populations and this has been modeled in a companion California Landscape Conservation Cooperative project (Veloz et al. 2011). However, habitat alone will ensure neither resilience nor recovery of depleted and threatened populations. To provide management guidance to reduce species’ vulnerability and recover depleted populations, we developed interactive population dynamic models for four key marsh species: Black Rail, Clapper Rail, Common...
thumbnail
Final Report - Executive Summary: This final project report is prepared to summarize the research project titled “Assessing evapotranspiration rate changes for proposed restoration of the forested uplands of the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC)” for the Desert LCC of the Bureau of Reclamation as a requirement for closing out the project. This report includes the scope of work, summary of research project, results, and conclusions. Among all of the components of the terrestrial water cycle, evapotranspiration (ET) consumes the largest amount of water. Accurate estimation of ET is very important to understand the influence of ET to the hydrologic response of recharge and runoff processes in the water...
This community serves to document data and analysis collected by researchers within the Upper Midwest Water Science Center whose mission is to collect high-quality hydrologic data and conduct unbiased, scientifically sound studies of water resources within the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi Basins. We strive to meet the changing needs of those who use our information—from the distribution, availability, and quality of our water resources to topic-oriented research that addresses current hydrological issues.
What are current conditions for important park natural resources? What are the critical data and knowledge gaps? What are some of the factors that are influencing park resource conditions? Natural Resource Condition Assessments (NRCAs) evaluate and report on the above for a subset of important natural resources in national park units (hereafter, parks). Focal study resources and indicators are selected on a park-by-park basis, guided by use of structured resource assessment and reporting frameworks. Considerations include park resource setting and enabling legislation (what are this park's most important natural resources?) and presently available data and expertise (what can be evaluated at this time?). In addition...
thumbnail
Natural landscapes in the Southwestern United States are changing. In recent decades, rising temperatures and drought have led to drier conditions, contributed to large-scale ecological impacts, and affected many plant and animal species across the region. The current and future trajectory of climate change underscores the need for managers and conservation professionals to understand the impacts of these patterns on natural resources. In this regional assessment of the Southwest Climate Change Initiative, we evaluate changes in annual average temperatures from 1951–2006 across major habitats and large watersheds and compare these changes to the number of species of conservation concern that are found within these...
thumbnail
Percent change in the average surface runoff for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Simulated mean annual surface runoff (in mm H2O yr-1), was determined for each HUC5 watershed by averaging values of original ~ 4 km raster data. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen...
thumbnail
Percent change in the mean area burned per year (per ~4 km pixel ) for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Mean area burned per year per ~4 km pixel, (in square meters), was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget,...
thumbnail
Change in the majority generalized vegetation type for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario. Majority generalized vegetation type was determined for each HUC5 watershed from from original ~ 4 km raster data. Generalized vegetation types were assigned by combining detailed MC1 vegetation classes into four general catagories: desert, grassland, shrubland, and forest. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background:...
thumbnail
This dataset represents the average amount of live tree carbon for each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Simulated mean live forest carbon (output variable C_Forestyr in MC1 version B60, which includes both above and below-ground tree carbon) was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Units are grams per square meter. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and...
thumbnail
Percent change in the mean area burned per year (per ~4 km pixel) for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario. Mean area burned per year per ~4 km pixel (in square meters), was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water...
thumbnail
This map represents the percent change in total ecosystem carbon from 1971-2000 to 2070-2099, simulated by the model MC1 under the Hadley future climate projection and A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario. The average annual value of total ecosystem carbon for the respective 30-year periods decreased in some of the 5,311 grid cells of the Eastern Oregon study area and increased in others.The range of data values is from -18.2% to +194.1%. The mean value is -78.0% The vegetation model MC1 (e.g. Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts at two study sites, one in eastern Oregon (Deschutes and Fremont-Winema National Forests)...
thumbnail
This map represents the difference in annual minimum temperatures, simulated by the model MC1 between the 30-year periods 1971-2000 and 2070-2099, using the Hadley future climate projection under the A2 anthropogenic emission scenario. The average annual minimum temperature for the respective 30-year periods increased in all of the 5,311 grid cells of the Apache-Sitgreaves study area. The greatest increase was 4.35 C; the least increase was 4.26 C; and the mean increase was 4.31 C. The vegetation model MC1 (e.g. Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts at two study sites in eastern Oregon (Deschutes and Fremont-Winema...


map background search result map search result map Historical Growing Degree Days (average 1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated change in generalized vegetation types between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical live forest carbon (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated percent change in area burned between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA A Monitoring Protocol to Assess Wintering Shorebird Population Trends Forecasting Beach Loss from Sea-Level Rise on the Island of Kauaʻi Simulated percent change in surface runoff between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Simulated percent change in area burned between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Percent change in the average annual value of total ecosystem carbon between 1971-2000 and 2070-2099, as simulated by MC1 under Hadley A2 for the Eastern Oregon study area, USA Difference in mean annual minimum temperatures between 1971-2000 and 2070-2099 under Hadley A2 for the Apache-Sitgreaves study area, Arizona, USA Standard Deviation of Annual Precipitation (2045-2060) from HadCM3 GCM under A2 scenario (Western USA) 4KM Results: Bias-corrected Average Annual Temperature (2045- 2060) from GFDL-driven RegCM3 climate model (Western US) Calculated difference between simulated minimum temperatures for 2071 to 2100 under MIROC A2 climate scenario for the eastern Oregon study area, USA Natural Resource Condition Assessments Managing Changing Landscapes in the Southwestern United States Output Data from Hydrologic Simulations of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in the southeastern U.S. using the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System Report and Publications: Assessing Evapotranspiration Rate Changes for Proposed Restoration of the Forested Uplands of the DLCC Upper Midwest Water Science Center Forecasting Beach Loss from Sea-Level Rise on the Island of Kauaʻi Difference in mean annual minimum temperatures between 1971-2000 and 2070-2099 under Hadley A2 for the Apache-Sitgreaves study area, Arizona, USA Percent change in the average annual value of total ecosystem carbon between 1971-2000 and 2070-2099, as simulated by MC1 under Hadley A2 for the Eastern Oregon study area, USA Calculated difference between simulated minimum temperatures for 2071 to 2100 under MIROC A2 climate scenario for the eastern Oregon study area, USA Output Data from Hydrologic Simulations of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in the southeastern U.S. using the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System A Monitoring Protocol to Assess Wintering Shorebird Population Trends Report and Publications: Assessing Evapotranspiration Rate Changes for Proposed Restoration of the Forested Uplands of the DLCC Simulated percent change in area burned between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Managing Changing Landscapes in the Southwestern United States Simulated percent change in surface runoff between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Simulated percent change in area burned between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Historical Growing Degree Days (average 1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated change in generalized vegetation types between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical live forest carbon (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Standard Deviation of Annual Precipitation (2045-2060) from HadCM3 GCM under A2 scenario (Western USA) 4KM Results: Bias-corrected Average Annual Temperature (2045- 2060) from GFDL-driven RegCM3 climate model (Western US) Natural Resource Condition Assessments