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This dataset represents the average amount of Growing Degree Days (GDD) per year within each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Growing degree days (referenced to 0oC) (unit = deg C days) were determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries. They were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW 09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1 model...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through statistical...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through statistical...
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This map shows the predicted area of high fire potential for the current year up to the end of the forecast period as simulated by a modified version of the MC1 Dynamic General Vegetation Model (DGVM). Different colors indicate the level of consensus among five different MC1 simulations (i.e., one for each forecast provided by five different weather models), ranging from one of five to five of five simulations predicting high fire potential. The area of high fire potential is where PDSI and MC1-calculated values of potential fire behavior (fireline intensity for forest and shrubland and rate of spread of spread for grassland) exceed calibrated threshold values. Potential fire behavior in MC1 is estimated using...
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This map shows the predicted area of high fire potential for the current year up to the end of the forecast period as simulated by a modified version of the MC1 Dynamic General Vegetation Model (DGVM). Different colors indicate the level of consensus among five different MC1 simulations (i.e., one for each forecast provided by five different weather models), ranging from one of five to five of five simulations predicting high fire potential. The area of high fire potential is where PDSI and MC1-calculated values of potential fire behavior (fireline intensity for forest and shrubland and rate of spread of spread for grassland) exceed calibrated threshold values. Potential fire behavior in MC1 is estimated using...
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MC1 is a dynamic vegetation model for estimating the distribution of vegetation and associated ecosystem fluxes of carbon, nutrients, and water. It was created to assess the potential impacts of global climate change on ecosystem structure and function at a wide range of spatial scales from landscape to global. The model incorporates transient dynamics to make predictions about the patterns of ecological change. MC1 was created by combining physiologically based biogeographic rules defined in the MAPSS model with a modified version of the biogeochemical model, CENTURY. MC1 includes a fire module, MCFIRE, that mechanistically simulates the occurrence and impacts of fire events. Climate input data sources for this...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model Mc1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), Water leached in the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. the output is prsented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain....
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This dataset represents the average net primary production for each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Mean net primary production (in g m-2 per yr), was determined for each HUC5 watershed by averaging values of original ~ 4 km raster data. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al.2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1...
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Louisiana Waterthrush - VizBand/Land AIC Model Selection Created: 05-Oct-2011 Louisiana Waterthrush annual capture rate of adult (ADULT) individuals (log transformed) ranged between -0.220 and +2.009 with a mean value of +0.895 and a median value of +0.794. ________________________________________ Model 1 (2 parameters) Louisiana Waterthrush annual capture rate of adult (ADULT) individuals (log transformed) was a function of: a) DIST2RIV15 (-0.30142) - distance (m) to stream, ranged between -1.104 and +0.772 (95% CL) with a mean value of -0.166 and a median value of -0.121, b) NLCD06DE33P (+0.46681) - percent deciduous forest cover, 990m-resolution (33x aggregation of 30m-resolution), ranged between +1.446 and...
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Tree species locations
Tags: 3pg, model, forest
What are current conditions for important park natural resources? What are the critical data and knowledge gaps? What are some of the factors that are influencing park resource conditions? Natural Resource Condition Assessments (NRCAs) evaluate and report on the above for a subset of important natural resources in national park units (hereafter, parks). Focal study resources and indicators are selected on a park-by-park basis, guided by use of structured resource assessment and reporting frameworks. Considerations include park resource setting and enabling legislation (what are this park's most important natural resources?) and presently available data and expertise (what can be evaluated at this time?). In addition...
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Natural landscapes in the Southwestern United States are changing. In recent decades, rising temperatures and drought have led to drier conditions, contributed to large-scale ecological impacts, and affected many plant and animal species across the region. The current and future trajectory of climate change underscores the need for managers and conservation professionals to understand the impacts of these patterns on natural resources. In this regional assessment of the Southwest Climate Change Initiative, we evaluate changes in annual average temperatures from 1951–2006 across major habitats and large watersheds and compare these changes to the number of species of conservation concern that are found within these...
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Percent change in the average surface runoff for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Simulated mean annual surface runoff (in mm H2O yr-1), was determined for each HUC5 watershed by averaging values of original ~ 4 km raster data. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen...
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Percent change in the mean area burned per year (per ~4 km pixel ) for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Mean area burned per year per ~4 km pixel, (in square meters), was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget,...
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Change in the majority generalized vegetation type for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario. Majority generalized vegetation type was determined for each HUC5 watershed from from original ~ 4 km raster data. Generalized vegetation types were assigned by combining detailed MC1 vegetation classes into four general catagories: desert, grassland, shrubland, and forest. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background:...
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This dataset represents the average amount of live tree carbon for each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Simulated mean live forest carbon (output variable C_Forestyr in MC1 version B60, which includes both above and below-ground tree carbon) was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Units are grams per square meter. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and...


map background search result map search result map Historical Growing Degree Days (average 1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated change in generalized vegetation types between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical live forest carbon (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated PNW biomass consumed (g C/m2) under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) Simulated runoff under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) in nillimeters for the Pacific Northwest, USA Tree species locations Simulated percent change in surface runoff between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Simulated historical net primary production (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated percent change in area burned between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-November 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-May 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) Louisiana Waterthrush (AHY) Vegetation Type for the United States and Canada Simulated for Historical data for the years 1961-1990 by the MC1 Model (NA8K version) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Natural Resource Condition Assessments Managing Changing Landscapes in the Southwestern United States Simulated PNW biomass consumed (g C/m2) under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) Simulated runoff under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) in nillimeters for the Pacific Northwest, USA Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Managing Changing Landscapes in the Southwestern United States Simulated percent change in surface runoff between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Simulated percent change in area burned between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Historical Growing Degree Days (average 1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated change in generalized vegetation types between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical live forest carbon (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical net primary production (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Louisiana Waterthrush (AHY) Tree species locations MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-November 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-May 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) Vegetation Type for the United States and Canada Simulated for Historical data for the years 1961-1990 by the MC1 Model (NA8K version) Natural Resource Condition Assessments