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Synopsis: This report evaluates habitat requirements of the American badger according to parameters of soil texture, graminoid cover, slope, and proximity to roads. Badgers tend to prefer sandy loam and silty loam, medium and moderately coarse textured soils. In terms of graminoid coverage, badgers generally prefer open grassland habitat, but can also be found in agriculturally dominated landscapes containing isolated pockets of Richardson 's ground squirrel colonies. Graminoid coverage of 23% was chosen as the minimum requirement for suitable badger habitat. As slope increases, habitat suitability decreases to a point at which the likelihood of badgers existing there (i.e. cliffs and badlands) is extremely low...
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Conclusions: Few species were in fact influenced by grassland amount or fragmentation. In contrast, distance to edge and local vegetation characteristics had significant effects on densities and nest success of many species. Thresholds/Learnings: Great Plains toads thrive when >75% of the landscape is composed of native prairie components (i.e. shrubs, graminoids, riparian areas, lakes, wetlands, and trees) . Synopsis: In Alberta, Great Plains toads are found in the dry mixed grass of the southeastern corner of the province. Typical breeding habitat tends to be in shallow ponds with relatively fresh, clear water in sandy soil. In this report habitat suitability was evaluated for the Great Plains toad according...
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Conclusions: Richardson's ground squirrels prefer short grass native prairie / pasture but can also occupy small isolated islands within cropland. These squirrels prefer open prairies and tend to select against heavily forested areas. *Note that this study generated landscape level models with coarse variables, and the thresholds and values used may not be directly applicable to other areas or for site-specific analysis. Thresholds/Learnings: A threshold amount of 20% graminoid coverage is the minimum suitable proportion for habitat suitability for Richarson's ground squirrel. Areas with less than 20% forest/shrub cover were considered sutiable habitat, while those greater than 40% were considered unsuitable*. ...
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Conclusions: Valleys are the only areas capable of sustaining sufficient habitat for the butterfly species, Weidemeyer's Admiral. Consequently, all other areas (i.e. plains, uplands, benches, escarpments, plateaus) were deemed unsuitable. Additionally, areas devoid of shrub cover did not meet the habitat requirements of this specialized species. Thresholds/Learnings: Synopsis: Two variables were selected to model potential habitat for the butterfly species, Weidemeyer's Admiral. Topographical features derived from the Agricultural Region of Alberta Soils Inventory Database (AGRASID) and percent shrub cover derived from the Native Prairie Vegetation Baseline Inventory developed by Alberta Environment were used to...
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Conclusions: Areas for roosting are likely the most limiting factor for the Western Small-footed Myotis. Unlike various other bats, this myotis does not roost in trees, but rather under rocks, and in holes and crevices found in rock outcrops within cliffs and coulees. Summer roosts can be found in cavities within cliffs, boulders, vertical banks, the ground, and talus slopes. Distance to water was also a significant factor affecting habitat suitability Thresholds/Learnings: Habitat for western small-footed myotis bats is ideally located within 1000m of water. Habitat located >3000m from water is deemed unsuitable. Synopsis: Areas for roosting are likely the most limiting factor for the Western Small-footed Myotis....
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Synopsis: This document details the Milk River Basin project, designed to produce innovative approaches to multi-species management in Southern Alberta. The Milk River basin contains a variety of ‘sensitive’, ‘at risk’, and ‘may be at risk’ species. The process of prioritizing the landscape for conservation and stewardship was driven by species inventories to identify known locations, and Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models to delimit suitable key habitat for the 17 selected species. The construction of the models was limited to the available variables and resolution of the databases. For MULTISAR: the Milk River Basin Project area this was the quarter section, the resolution of the Native Prairie Vegetation...
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Synopsis: This model is based around Native Prairie Cover types, and Soil Texture. Native Prairie Class (NPC) is derived from the Native Prairie Vegetation Baseline Inventory developed by AlbertaEnvironment. Class I is comprised of greater than 75% native prairie components (i.e. shrubs, graminoids, riparian areas, lakes, wetlands, and trees), Class 2 is 50 - 75%, Class 3 is 25 - 50%, Class 4 is 1 - 25%, and Class 5 is no native prairie components. Native prairie is probably the most important and limiting factor for ferruginous hawks. Although hawks have been found in areas that were primarily under cultivation), they were in close proximity to prairie in good condition. Overall NPC was selected over its individual...


    map background search result map search result map Great Plains Toad (Bufo cognatus) Western Small-footed Myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum ciliolabrum) Weidemeyer's Admiral Ferruginous Hawk. Richardson's Ground Squirrel. The Milk River Basin Project; Habitat Suitability Models for Selected Wildlife Management Species No. 86. Alberta Species At Risk Report, Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, 2004 American Badger. Weidemeyer's Admiral Ferruginous Hawk. The Milk River Basin Project; Habitat Suitability Models for Selected Wildlife Management Species No. 86. Alberta Species At Risk Report, Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, 2004 American Badger. Great Plains Toad (Bufo cognatus) Western Small-footed Myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum ciliolabrum) Richardson's Ground Squirrel.