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Electric utilities in the US have initiated forestry projects to conserve energy and to o€set carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. In 1995, 40 companies raised US$2.5 million to establish the non-pro®t UtiliTree Carbon Company which is now sponsoring eight projects representing a mix of rural tree planting, forest preservation, forest management and research e€orts at both domestic (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Oregon) and international sites (Belize and Malaysia). The projects include extensive external veri®cation. Such forestry projects Ð properly documented, monitored and veri®ed Ð should be a component of domestic and international strategies to address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, due to GHG bene®ts,...
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This dataset represents the soil texture from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of western Oregon that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative. Soil texture is the mineral particle size distribution of soil particles within a soil horizon. This dataset also documents rock fragments and organic matter that may contribute to water infiltration, storage and relocation within the surface horizons of the soil profile. For reference, see NRCS soil texture triangle: http://soils.usda.gov/technical/aids/investigations/texture/
An unsaturated-zone transport model was used to examine the transport and fate of metolachlor applied to an agricultural site in Maryland, USA. The study site was instrumented to collect data on soil-water content, soil-water potential, ground water levels, major ions, pesticides, and nutrients from the unsaturated zone during 2002-2004. The data set was enhanced with site-specific information describing weather, soils, and agricultural practices. The Root Zone Water Quality Model was used to simulate physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in the unsaturated zone. Model calibration to bromide tracer concentrations indicated flow occurred through the soil matrix. Simulated recharge rates were within...
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The cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau contain numerous geologically and geochemically distinct sedimentary bedrock types. In the area near Canyonlands National Park in Southeastern Utah, geochemical variation in geologic substrates is related to the depositional environment with higher concentrations of Fe, Al, P, K, and Mg in sediments deposited in alluvial or marine environments and lower concentrations in bedrock derived from eolian sand dunes. Availability of soil nutrients to vegetation is also controlled by the formation of secondary minerals, particularly for P and Ca availability, which, in some geologic settings, appears closely related to variation of CaCO3 and Ca-phosphates in soils. However, the results...
Geochemists have long recognized a correlation between rates of physical denudation and chemical weathering. What underlies this correlation? The Critical Zone can be considered as a feed-through reactor. Downward advance of the weathering front brings unweathered rock into the reactor. Fluids are supplied through precipitation. The reactor is stirred at the top by biological and physical processes. The balance between advance of the weathering front by mechanical and chemical processes and mass loss by denudation fixes the thickness of the Critical Zone reactor. The internal structure of this reactor is controlled by physical processes that create surface area, determine flow paths, and set the residence time of...
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A species has been applied to each hectare based on the 6 species fields in the raw data and the percentage of each species within a given polygon. For example a hectare which is 75% Pine and 25% Cedar has a 25% chance of being flagged as ''Cedar'' and 75% chance of being flagged as ''Pine''. A code describing the commercial species or brush species in the layer. Species must be above a specified diameter to be recognized in the species composition of the layer. Leading species are described in terms of Genus, Species and Subspecies. There are currently 27 commercial tree species and five genus values recognized in the Province. The code may also used to describe brush species in cases where the Non-Productive Descriptor...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model Mc1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), Water leached in the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. the output is prsented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain....
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This dataset depicts relative erosion rate derived for all land draining above the Mesoamerican reef. It is a function of slope, land cover type, precipitation and soil type. The indicators developed by the Reefs at Risk in the Caribbean project enable detailed comparative analyses of threats on many scales. The Reefs at Risk indicators are a simplification of human activities and complex natural processes. This data set was derived at the World Resources Institute for input to the sedimentation and pollution from watershed based sources threat analysis. Agriculture, though important to economic development and food security, is a source of increased sediment, nutrient, and pesticide runoff. Threats from sedimentation...
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Using basins derived from a hydrologically-corrected 30m resolution DEM as a unit for summary statistics, we provide a series of indicators focused on land-based sources of threat within the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. This includes indicators of a) the relative vulnerability of the land to erosion (based on slope, precipitation and soil erodibility); b) the relative erosion potential (REP) of the land, based on the relative vulnerability of the land, coupled with the current land cover type; c) the sediment delivery rate for each basin (percentage of eroded which reaches the river mouth); d) estimated sediment delivery for the basin, given current land use;
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This dataset represents the soil pH from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of southern Alaska that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
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This dataset represents the soil pH from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of western Washington that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
Tags: acid, alkaline, ph, soil
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This dataset represents the average amount of soil carbon within each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Soil carbon, in g m-2, was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al.2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1 model was run using historical data and future climate change projections...
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This dataset represents the soil water storage capacity (AWS in mm at 0.25 m depth) from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of southern Alaska that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative. Available Water Storage 0-25 cm - Weighted Average (centimeters). Available water storage (AWS). The volume of water that the soil, to a depth of 25 centimeters, can store that is available to plants. It is reported as the weighted average of all components in the map unit, and is expressed as centimeters of water. AWS is calculated from AWC (available water capacity) which is commonly estimated as the difference between the water contents at 1/10 or 1/3 bar (field capacity)...
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This dataset represents the soil water storage capacity (AWS in mm at 0.5 m depth) from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of southern Alaska that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative. Available Water Storage 0-50 cm - Weighted Average (centimeters). Available water storage (AWS). The volume of water that the soil, to a depth of 50 centimeters, can store that is available to plants. It is reported as the weighted average of all components in the map unit, and is expressed as centimeters of water. AWS is calculated from AWC (available water capacity) which is commonly estimated as the difference between the water contents at 1/10 or 1/3 bar (field capacity)...
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This dataset represents the soil pH from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of northern California that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
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This dataset represents the soil order from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of southern Alaska (b) that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative.


map background search result map search result map Controls of Bedrock Geochemistry on Soil and Plant Nutrients in Southeastern Utah Soil accumulations for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- northern California, USA Soil texture for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- western Oregon, USA Soil order for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (b), USA Tree species from the Vegetation Resource Inventory for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, British Columbia, Canada Simulated average historical soil carbon (1971-2000) for AZ and NM, USA Soil water storage capacity (AWS in mm at 0.25 m depth) for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (a), USA Soil water storage capacity (AWS in mm at 0.5 m depth) for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (a), USA Soil pH for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (b), USA Soil pH for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- western Washington, USA Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Mesoamerican Relative Erosion Rate Puerto Rico Watershed Indicators by Basin Controls of Bedrock Geochemistry on Soil and Plant Nutrients in Southeastern Utah Puerto Rico Watershed Indicators by Basin Soil accumulations for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- northern California, USA Soil pH for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- western Washington, USA Soil texture for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- western Oregon, USA Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Soil order for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (b), USA Mesoamerican Relative Erosion Rate Simulated average historical soil carbon (1971-2000) for AZ and NM, USA Soil pH for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (b), USA Soil water storage capacity (AWS in mm at 0.25 m depth) for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (a), USA Soil water storage capacity (AWS in mm at 0.5 m depth) for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative- southern Alaska (a), USA Tree species from the Vegetation Resource Inventory for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, British Columbia, Canada