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Climate change is projected to cause earlier and less snowmelt, potentially reducing water availability for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and for municipal and agricultural water supplies. However, if forested landscapes can be managed to retain snow longer, some of these environmental and financial impacts may be mitigated. Results from our research team demonstrate that in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), opening dense forest canopies through creating forest gaps will generally lead to more snow accumulation and later melt (i.e., up to 13 weeks later). However, under certain conditions, such as locations on ridges with high wind speeds and sunny south-facing slopes, the snow that accumulated in the forest is...
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This dataset is one of a dozen or so datasets that provide the basis for a vulnerability assessment of the Great Northern LCC that examines land use and climate changes at landscape scales, for the full LCC boundary. It represents terrestrially-defined adaptive capacity, where values run from 0 to 1.0 and is calculated as the complement of the degree of human modification (1-H). The original floating point values ranging from 0-1.0 were multiplied by 100 and converted to integer format for this dataset.


    map background search result map search result map Forest Management Tools to Maximize Snow Retention under Climate Change Awp: combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity (Aw) for Great Northern LCC Forest Management Tools to Maximize Snow Retention under Climate Change Awp: combined measure of physiographic diversity (EH) and hydrologically-defined adaptive capacity (Aw) for Great Northern LCC