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Organization

Western Ecological Research Center

Western Ecological Research Center
https://www.usgs.gov/centers/werc

Location
Modoc Hall
Modoc Hall, USGS
3020 State University Drive East
Sacramento , CA 95819
USA
Parent Organization: Office of the Southwest Regional Director
This dataset contains mercury concentrations and locations of wintering red-legged kittiwakes in the western subartic Pacific Ocean. These data support the following publication: Fleishman, AB, RA Orben, N Kokubun, A Will, R Paredes, JT Ackerman, A Takahashi, AS Kitaysky, and SA Shaffer. 2019. Wintering in the Western Subarctic Pacific increases mercury contamination of red-legged kittiwakes. Environmental Science and Technology, in press.
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The spring 2017 mainland sea otter count began on April 30, and although the shore-based counts were completed by May 12, 2017, the aerial counts were not completed until July 12, 2017. Overall viewing conditions this year were good, although not as good as conditions experienced during the 2016 spring census (View Score 2.4 versus 3.1, where 0=poor, 1=fair, 2=good, 3=very good, and 4=excellent). The surface canopies of kelp (Macrocystis sp.) were considered by most participants to be considerably below normal for this time of year in most areas of the mainland range. Sea otters along the mainland coast were surveyed from Pillar Point in San Mateo County in the north to Rincon Point in the south at the Santa Barbara/Ventura...
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The U.S. Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research Center (USGS-WERC) was requested by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to create a database for marine birds of the California Current System (CCS) that would allow quantification and species ranking regarding vulnerability to offshore wind energy infrastructure (OWEI). This was needed so that resource managers could evaluate potential impacts associated with siting and construction of OWEI within the California Current System section of the Pacific Offshore Continental Shelf, including California, Oregon, and Washington. Along with its accompanying Open File Report (OFR), this comprehensive database can be used (and modified or updated) to quantify...
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To improve our understanding of health and immune function in tortoises, we evaluated both standard blood diagnostic (body condition, hematologic, plasma biochemistry values, trace elements, plasma proteins, vitamin A levels) and gene transcription profiles in 21 adult tortoises (11 clinically abnormal; 10 clinically normal) from Clark County, NV, USA. Necropsy and histology evaluations from clinically abnormal tortoises revealed multiple physiological complications, with moderate to severe rhinitis or pneumonia being the primary cause of morbidity in all but one of the examined animals. Improved methods for health assessments are an important element of monitoring tortoise population recovery and can support the...
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We collected detailed spatial data on the density and size distribution of intertidal snails as part of a broader effort to understand food webs in California estuaries. The survey area was Carpinteria Salt Marsh, California USA, which comprises 9 Ha tidal channels, 2 Ha salt flats, 17 Ha upland habitat, 6 Ha tidal pans, 52 Ha vegetated marsh, 2 Ha tidal flats. Using nearly 4,000 transects in potential snail habitat, we mapped snails throughout the estuary. Specifically, we systematically placed transects at intervals stratified within targeted habitat types: channels, pans, or marsh (or planar habitat that was mixed marsh and pan). At a quarter of the quadrats, we also estimated snail size-frequency distributions....
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