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Tyler D Johnson

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Groundwater quality data were collected in 5,000 wells between 1988-2001 by the National Water-Quality Assessment Project. About 1,500 of these wells were sampled again between 2002-2012 to evaluate decadal changes in groundwater quality. Monitoring wells, domestic supply wells, and some public supply wells were included in this study. All water was collected prior to treatment. Groundwater samples used to evaluate decadal change were collected from networks of wells with similar characteristics. Some networks, consisting of domestic or public supply wells, were used to assess changes in the quality of groundwater used for drinking water supply. Other networks, consisting of monitoring wells, assessed changes in...
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The U.S. Geological Survey collected groundwater samples from 49 wells used for domestic and small system drinking water supplies in Amador, Placer, Sutter, and Sacramento counties, California in 2017. The sites were sampled for the Sacramento Metropolitan (SacMetro) Shallow Aquifer Study Unit of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project’s assessment of the quality of groundwater resources used for domestic and small system drinking water supplies. Domestic and small-system wells are commonly screened at shallower depths than public-supply wells. The SacMetro study unit consisted of three “study areas” corresponding to three...
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Evaluating Decadal Changes in Groundwater Quality: Groundwater quality data were collected from 5,000 wells between 1988-2001 (first sampling event) by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment Project. Samples are collected in groups of 20-30 wells with similar characteristics called networks. About 1,500 of these wells in 67 networks were sampled about 10 years later between 2002-2012 (second sampling event) to evaluate decadal changes in groundwater quality. Between 2012 and 2014 (third sampling event), a subset of these networks has been sampled again, allowing additional results to be displayed on the web page: Decadal changes in groundwater quality. Changes to this web page are referred...
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The California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program (GAMA) is a statewide, comprehensive assessment of groundwater quality designed to help better understand and identify risks to groundwater resources. GAMA is being implemented by the California State Water Resources Control Board. The USGS is the technical lead for the Priority Basin Project (PBP), one of the components of the GAMA Program. The initial focus of the GAMA Priority Basin Project in 2004 to 2012 was on assessment of water-quality in groundwater resources used for public drinking water supply (Belitz and others, 2003; 2015). Groundwater basins and sub-basins (472 in total) were prioritized based upon a number of factors (Belitz and...
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Chemical data from 43,334 wells were used to examine the role of land surface-soil-aquifer connections in producing elevated manganese concentrations (>300 µg/L) in United States (U.S.) groundwater. Elevated manganese and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were associated with shallow water tables and organic-carbon rich soils, suggesting soil-derived DOC supported manganese reduction. Manganese and DOC concentrations were higher near rivers than farther from rivers, suggesting river-derived DOC also supported manganese reduction. Anthropogenic nitrogen may also affect manganese concentrations in groundwater. In parts of the northeastern U.S. containing poorly buffered soils, ~40% of the samples with...
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