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Person

Brian E Reichert

Ecologist

Fort Collins Science Center

Email: breichert@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 970-226-9245
Fax: 970-226-9230

Location
2150 Centre Avenue
Building C
Fort Collins , CO 80526-8118
US

Supervisor: Sharon K Taylor
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The NABat sampling frame is a grid-based finite-area frame spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico consisting of N total number of 10- by 10-km (100-km2) grid cell sample units for the continental United States, Canada, and Alaska and 5- by 5-km (25km2) for Hawaii and Puerto Rico. This grain size is biologically appropriate given the scale of movement of most bat species, which routinely travel many kilometers each night between roosts and foraging areas and along foraging routes. A Generalized Random-Tessellation Stratified (GRTS) Survey Design draw was added to the sample units from the raw sampling grids (https://doi.org/10.5066/P9M00P17). This sampling design produces an ordered list of units such that...
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The NABat sampling frame is a grid-based finite-area frame spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico consisting of N total number of 10- by 10-km (100-km2) grid cell sample units. This grain size is biologically appropriate given the scale of movement of most bat species, which routinely travel many kilometers each night between roosts and foraging areas and along foraging routes. A draw of sample units from a finite sampling frame using the GRTS design produces an ordered list of units such that any ordered subset of that list is also randomized and spatially balanced. This vector dataset is the individual grid-based sampling grid for Continental United States at a 10x10km resolution.
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This sampling frame is a set of grid-based finite-area frames spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The grid for the United States is broken into individual grids for the continental United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Alaska is combined with Canada into a single grid. Each country/state/territory extent consists of four nested sampling grids at 50x50km, 10x10km, 5x5km, and 1x1km resolutions. The original 10x10km continental United States grid was developed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in the interagency “Bat Grid” monitoring program in the Pacific Northwest and was expanded across Canada, the United States, and Mexico for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)....
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In this age of rapidly developing technology, scientific information is constantly being gathered across large spatial scales. Yet, our ability to coordinate large-scale monitoring efforts depends on development of tools that leverage and integrate multiple sources of data. North American bats are experiencing unparalleled population declines. The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat), a multi-national, multi-agency coordinated monitoring program, was developed to better understand the status and trends of North American bats. Similar to other large-scale monitoring programs, the ultimate success of NABat relies on a unified web-based data system. Our project successfully developed a program interface...
This sampling frame is a set of grid-based finite-area frames spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The grid for the United States is broken into individual grids for the continental United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Alaska is combined with Canada into a single grid. Each country/state/territory extent consists of four nested sampling grids at 50x50km, 10x10km, 5x5km, and 1x1km resolutions. The original 10x10km continental United States grid was developed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in the interagency “Bat Grid” monitoring program in the Pacific Northwest and was expanded across Canada, the United States, and Mexico for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)....
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