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Person

Brian E Reichert

Ecologist - NABat Coordinator

Fort Collins Science Center

Email: breichert@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 970-226-9245
Fax: 970-226-9230
ORCID: 0000-0002-9640-0695

Location
NRRC Bldg C
2150 Centre Avenue
Building C
Fort Collins , CO 80526-8118
US

Supervisor: Sharon K Taylor
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The NABat sampling frame is a grid-based finite-area frame spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico consisting of N total number of 10- by 10-km (100-km2) grid cell sample units for the continental United States, Canada, and Alaska and 5- by 5-km (25km2) for Hawaii and Puerto Rico. This grain size is biologically appropriate given the scale of movement of most bat species, which routinely travel many kilometers each night between roosts and foraging areas and along foraging routes. A Generalized Random-Tessellation Stratified (GRTS) Survey Design draw was added to the sample units from the raw sampling grids (https://doi.org/10.5066/P9M00P17). This sampling design produces an ordered list of units such that...
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This sampling frame is a set of grid-based finite-area frames spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The grid for the United States is broken into individual grids for the continental United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Alaska is combined with Canada into a single grid. Each country/state/territory extent consists of four nested sampling grids at 50x50km, 10x10km, 5x5km, and 1x1km resolutions. The original 10x10km continental United States grid was developed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture for use in the interagency “Bat Grid” monitoring program in the Pacific Northwest and was expanded across Canada, the United States, and Mexico for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)....
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The NABat sampling frame is a grid-based finite-area frame spanning Canada, the United States, and Mexico consisting of N total number of 10- by 10-km (100-km2) grid cell sample units. This grain size is biologically appropriate given the scale of movement of most bat species, which routinely travel many kilometers each night between roosts and foraging areas and along foraging routes. A draw of sample units from a finite sampling frame using the GRTS design produces an ordered list of units such that any ordered subset of that list is also randomized and spatially balanced. This vector dataset is the individual grid-based sampling grid for Continental United States at a 10x10km resolution.
The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is a multi-national, multi-agency coordinated bat monitoring program across North America. The overall NABat effort provides the biological, administrative, and statistical architecture for coordinated bat population monitoring to support regional and range-wide inferences about changes in the distributions and abundances of bat populations facing current and emerging threats. Data management and centralized data storage capabilities are integral to the success of the NABat Program. As such, the NABat Coordinating Office has developed a web-based application that provides IT infrastructure for the international monitoring program, including cloud-hosted data management...
Categories: Data
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Through the North American Bat Monitoring Program, United States Geological Survey (USGS) provided technical and science support to assist in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ Species Status Assessment (“SSA”) for the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis), little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), and tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus). USGS facilitated the SSA data call, provided data archival for repeatable and transparent analyses, provided statistical support to assess the historical, current, and future population status for each of the three species, and developed a demographic projection tool to evaluate future viability of each species under multiple threat scenarios. These data represent the derived...
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