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Desert Research Institute

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This raster depicts the percentage of lithological the hydraulic conductivity (in micrometers per second) of surface or near surface geology. We derived these rasters by calculating the average conductivity for each map unit in combined surficial-bedrock geologic maps. We used state geologic maps (Preliminary Integrated Geologic Map Databases for the United States, Open File Reports 2004-1355, 2005-1305, 2005-1323, 2005-1324, 2005-1325, 2005-1351, and 2006-1272), which depict surficial geology instead of bedrock when the surficial layers are sufficiently deep. For the state maps that do not incorporate surficial geology (i.e., midwestern states), we overlaid surficial geologic map units with thicknesses greater...
This workbook summarizes geochemical data for each lithology contained within the USGS Preliminary Integrated Geologic Map Databases for the United States (Open File Reports 2004-1355, 2005-1305, 2005-1323, 2005-1324, 2005-1325, 2005-1351, and 2006-1272). The summarized geochemical data contained in the “Lith Summary” spreadsheet (tab) is used to translate lithologies in state geologic maps into maps of continuous chemical characteristics (see Geochemical and Geophysical Characteristics of the Conterminous United States, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7X0653P). Full details of the data are provided in the “ReadMe” spreadsheet at the beginning of the workbook.
Categories: Data; Types: Citation; Tags: Bedrock, Geochemical, Geology
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FY2014One of the primary challenges facing public land managers in the Great Basin is identifying adaptation strategies to increase resiliency to climate change in an area that is already struggling with profound environmental challenges. Recent efforts to understand how the Great Basin weathered past droughts and climate variability may offer insight into approaches that could work in future decades. One approach to gather this information is to understand Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK). Gathering this information is challenging and requires an acknowledgment that much of this information is highly sensitive and proprietary. Translating this information into actionable management plans is even more challenging.This...
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FY2015Collaborators are investigating the effect of low rise dams water supply, ecosystem functions and health, and habitat for a wide range of organisms, including sage grouse. They are assessing the economic cost and attitudes of ranchers and managers towards both low-rise dams and proposed re-introductions of beavers. Remote sensing is used to identify locations of incised streams across the Great Basin.
This presentation aired as part of the Great Basin LCC webinar series on October 11, 2017. Speakers included Erica Fleishman, U.C. Davis, and Jimi Gragg, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.Description: As the distribution and abundance of non-native cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in the Great Basin has increased, the extent and frequency of fire in the region has increased by as much as 200%. These changes in fire regimes are associated with loss of the sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and native grasses and forbs in which many native animals, including Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), breed and feed. Managers have suggested changes in fire regimes, fuels treatments and post-fire restoration with...
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