Skip to main content

John W. Pohlman

thumbnail
Sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is the key sedimentary microbial process limiting methane emissions from marine sediments and methane seeps. In this study, we investigate how the presence of low-organic content sediment influences the capacity and efficiency of AOM at Bullseye vent, a gas hydrate-bearing cold seep offshore of Vancouver Island, Canada. The upper 8 m of sediment contains < 0.4 wt% total organic carbon (OC) and primarily consists of glacially-derived material that was deposited 14,900 to 15,900 yrs BP during the retreat of the late Quaternary Cordilleran Ice Sheet. We hypothesize this aged and exceptionally low-OC content sedimentary OM is biologically refractory, thereby limiting...
thumbnail
Analytical challenges in obtaining high quality measurements of rare earth elements (REEs) from small pore fluid volumes have limited the application of REEs as deep fluid geochemical tracers. Using a recently developed analytical technique, we analyzed REEs from pore fluids collected from Sites U1325 and U1329, drilled on the northern Cascadia margin during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311, to investigate the REE behavior during diagenesis and their utility as tracers of deep fluid migration. These sites were selected because they represent contrasting settings on an accretionary margin: a ponded basin at the toe of the margin, and the landward Tofino Basin near the shelf's edge. REE...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Chemical Geology
thumbnail
Continued warming of the Arctic may cause permafrost to thaw and speed the decomposition of large stores of soil organic carbon (OC), thereby accentuating global warming. However, it is unclear if recent warming has raised the current rates of permafrost OC release to anomalous levels or to what extent soil carbon release is sensitive to climate forcing. Here we use a time series of radiocarbon age-offsets (14C) between the bulk lake sediment and plant macrofossils deposited in an arctic lake as an archive for soil and permafrost OC release over the last 14,500 years. The lake traps and archives OC imported from the watershed and allows us to test whether prior warming events stimulated old carbon release and heightened...
thumbnail
The potential interactions between climate change and methane hydrate destabilization are among the most societally-relevant aspects of gas hydrates research. Massive dissociation of deep marine methane hydrates following rapid Earth warming is the most plausible explanation for carbon isotopic data that imply widespread release of microbial methane during the Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum (~55 million years ago), and massive methane hydrate degradation may have been associated with a major warming event in the Late Neoproterozoic as well. . On contemporary Earth, circumstantial evidence implies that permafrost-associated methane hydrate dissociation, possibly related to climate change, may be contributing to gas...
thumbnail
Atmospheric contributions of methane from Arctic wetlands during the Holocene are dynamic and linked to climate oscillations. However, long-term records linking climate variability to methane availability in Arctic wetlands are lacking. We present a multi-proxy ~12,000 year paleoecological reconstruction of intermittent methane availability from a radiocarbon-dated sediment core (LQ-West) taken from a shallow tundra lake (Qalluuraq Lake) in Arctic Alaska. Specifically, stable carbon isotopic values of photosynthetic biomarkers and methane are utilized to estimate the proportional contribution of methane-derived carbon to lake-sediment-preserved benthic (chironomids) and pelagic (cladocerans) components over the...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Paleolimnology
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.