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Natural Hazards

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High-resolution geophysical mapping of Lake Powell in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in Utah and Arizona was conducted between October 8 and November 15, 2017, as part of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Reclamation to provide high-quality data needed to reassess the area-capacity tables for the Lake Powell reservoir. Seismic data collected during this survey can help to define the rates of deposition within the San Juan and Colorado Rivers, which are the main inflows to Lake Powell. These new data are intended to improve water budget management decisions that affect the natural and recreational resources of the reservoir. Multibeam echosounder bathymetry and...
Categories: Data; Types: ArcGIS REST Map Service, ArcGIS Service Definition, Downloadable, Map Service; Tags: Antelope Canyon, BOR, Bullfrog, Bullfrog Bay, Bureau of Reclamation, All tags...
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This dataset represents 25 parallel longitudinal profiles that were extracted from terrestrial lidar point clouds taken during six survey periods. The six lidar surveys were conducted between 7 October 2010 and 8 October 2013. Over that time a colluvial hollow eroded into a fluvial channel. The longitudinal profiles show the topography of the colluvial hollow for each survey period. The width of the original colluvial hollow was approximately 1.25 m, and a longitudinal profile was extracted every 5 cm for the entire length of the hollow, resulting in 25 parallel longitudinal profiles. These data can be used to observe the transition of the colluvial hollow to a fluvial channel and furthermore they show the development...
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The West Hills of Portland, in the southern Tualatin Mountains, trend northwest along the west side of Portland, Oregon. These silt-mantled mountains receive significant wet-season precipitation and are prone to sliding during wet conditions, occasionally resulting in significant property damage or casualties. In an effort to develop a baseline for interpretive analysis of the groundwater response to rainfall, an automated monitoring system was installed in 2006 to measure rainfall, pore-water pressure, soil suction, soil-water potential, and volumetric water content at 15-minute intervals. The data show a cyclical pattern of groundwater and moisture content levels—wet from October to May and dry between June and...
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DATA ACCESS: See below under 'Attached Files' - click to download zip file package. Summary: The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase 2 data for Southern...
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The 2002 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Maps display earthquake ground motions for various probability levels across the United States and are applied in seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy. This update of the maps incorporates new findings on earthquake ground shaking, faults, seismicity, and geodesy. The resulting maps are derived from seismic hazard curves calculated on a grid of sites across the United States that describe the frequency of exceeding a set of ground motions.
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